Novice Needs Help! (1 Viewer)

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Hi All,

New to the forum and somewhat "new" to FJ ownership (I will explain). I need help from the experts here to get my rig all square.

"New" FJ explanation: Long story short - I bought a FJ60 years ago from a guy who had several FJs. I didn't know anything about FJs or mechanics in general and unfortunately he completely screwed me over, intentionally. He hid the fact that the FJ had been rolled over, had tons of mechanical issues, etc. I lived in a garage apartment at the time with no space to work on it (or knowledge of how to do so) so I sold it (and ended up always regretting it). Years later, I found a low mileage, 3 owner western desert rig and bought it and had it shipped across the country. Haven't had much time with work or a new baby to work on the rig but am starting to tackle it.

So here's where I need help:

1. Engine runs rough, when it runs - I can see it's got new distributor and wires, looks like maybe the PO threw some parts at it. While driving one day it started to idle rough - revving high and low then a few days later when driving it died. It would start and idle but stall out as soon as I tried to give it gas and drive. I was cutting through a neighborhood coming home so was able to idle the rest of the way back. As I started digging into this - I found that the FRAM inline fuel filter on the supply line to the fuel pump was dry - zero fuel flowing through it. I put some fuel directly into the carb through the vent tubes and it started immediately and ran until that fuel burned off. This confirmed my suspicion that the fuel pump was bad. I put fuel directly into the carb again but this time the FRAM filter started to have a small amount of fuel run through it. I went ahead and changed the pump because I thought that in-line filter should be FULL of gas. With the new pump on, I have the same result and same trickle through the FRAM filter. This FRAM filter is in-line AFTER the factory in-line filter. I'm waiting for delivery on a new OEM filter. After I replace this, I will remove the FRAM (I am hoping the OEM may just be original or old enough that it's clogged and is what is restricting the fuel flow - this would be best-case since it's a simple fix).

1A - should I replace the fuel pump or not? Given I have no improvement in fuel flow - I am inclined to put the old pump back on (looks like it was already replaced) because another factor is that the hard lines coming off the top of the fuel pump are not exactly in the same spot as previous pump and one of the lines hits the oil filter now.
1B - Fuel pump spacer - I cannot tell if my engine has a spacer or not - the pump I pulled off has a rubber gasket and what looks like another (very thin) rubber gasket on the block - NOT a spacer. But if I DO have a spacer and it's now compressed over time - I read that this can position the pump too far into the block - would this affect fuel flow? I have spacer on order also in case I need this or this is what's causing my low fuel flow

2 - Exhaust Leak - I have a MAJOR exhaust leak under the hood - I assume it's just the manifold gasket. Anyone have a link for a tutorial on the easiest way to change this - I looked last night in the dark and the hardest part looks like taking everything off that's above/around the exhaust manifold.

Rig is a 1985, 148K original miles, 3 owners on OME lift. Would also appreciate suggestions on new tires that will fit OEM wheels.

Thanks in advance!
 

3_puppies

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1B if there is no spacer on the stock pump it will not pump gas, so if it is running that is not the problem does the pump have 3 hardlines on the top of it?
 
Joined
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Exhaust Leak could be the smog system pumping poopy air out of a broken line somewhere, instead of the air rail. Chances are its probably the manifold, but could be the smog system too. Just a thought. Sorry you got screwed over, but the best revenge is to make it a sweet ride mannn. Also legal action is a good revenge too.
 
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Pictures of your fuel pump and spacer would help us know what you have. You could temporarily swap in an electric fuel pump for test purposes, leaving the return lines in place on the OEM mechanical pump.

Also, many/all 60s need a manifold gasket - it's a rite of passage. But, be sure (as Spock mentioned) that it's not an air pump fitting issue.

And, finally, it's not an 'FJ' - that is a 2 door 4runner variant (FJ Cruiser) sold in the 2000s - you have an 'FJ60' or '60'. Later, you will own a '40' and an '80', and your wife will observe that you driveway is full of old trucks.....
 

NeverGiveUpYota

Dare me.
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Pictures of your fuel pump and spacer would help us know what you have. You could temporarily swap in an electric fuel pump for test purposes, leaving the return lines in place on the OEM mechanical pump.

Also, many/all 60s need a manifold gasket - it's a rite of passage. But, be sure (as Spock mentioned) that it's not an air pump fitting issue.

And, finally, it's not an 'FJ' - that is a 2 door 4runner variant (FJ Cruiser) sold in the 2000s - you have an 'FJ60' or '60'. Later, you will own a '40' and an '80', and your wife will observe that you driveway is full of old trucks.....
👏👏👏
 
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Replace the Fuel pump, they are available new. don't go aftermarket.

whether you have the spacer or not - replace the gasket(s) on both sides of it, and use with a very very light coating of Toyota FIPG. also available from the dealer. (toyotas version of gasket maker)

replace the fuel filter with a Toyota filter, dont go FRAM. also available new from the dealer or many vendors here on MUD.

as previously mentioned, you probably need to do your manifold gasket, check the manifold for cracks, and sort out all the other vacuum leaks on the rig, which can be super common on the FJ60 as the myriad of vacuum lines age.

lastly, once you've got good fuel, spark, and air, perform a Lean Drop tune on the carb, and set the timing.

I know it sounds like a lot, but if you DYI, you will learn a ton in the process, understand your rig, and save some $. You're rig will run better than it ever has and you'll be good for many many miles.
 

lcolon

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You can check my thread on head removal for what is involved in getting the manifold on / off... just skip the part with removing the head :bang:

Carburator / Manifold / Head Removal

Since it is a "new to you" truck, once you get the fuel issue sorted, I would do a complete tuneup and perform the new cruiser baselining activities:

1. Fuel filter (you are already on that)
2. Cap / wires / rotor spark plugs - at least inspect them, check the plug gap, measure the resistance of the wires
3. Look at your vacuum lines - if they are the originals or cracked, replace with the silicone lines from mcmaster carr (you need about 50 feet of line to do everything). Reference the emissions manual and check the routing of all of the vacuum lines. Many times a previous owner may have things connected incorrectly
4. Check and adjust the timing
5. Check and adjust the valve clearance (replace valve cover gaskets while you are at it)
6. Inspect / replace the PCV valve
7. Get a vacuum gauge and measure your vacuum at idle - this will tell you if you have a leak somewhere (especially if you have not done #3)
8. Compression test on all cylinders and record the findings (for future reference as a baseline)
9. Inspect all the coolant hoses (there are 2 under the truck that go to the rear heater) - if any of them look shady or they appear to be really old, replace them all. There is no idiot light in a cruiser for temperature and if one of those hoses blows on the freeway, you may not notice until it is too late
10. Check all the belts and replace if necessary

Good Luck!
 
Joined
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Wow - thanks everyone, I am amazed at how much feedback I got!

So - here's what I know/ have learned from everyone:

- I must not have a spacer because there is no 1/4" thick piece.
-I can swap to an OEM fuel pump instead of the aftermarket that I just bought (I can return it) or what I believe is aftermarket that came on it - any advice on best place to buy an OEM? Local dealer?
-I am NOT going to swap an electric pump in, I read several threads on that topic and have no interest in it - I like mechanical over electric in general
- I have 3 hard lines on top of the pump, which looks to be 1 inlet, 1 outlet (to carb) and 1 inlet which is the return from carb(?)
-I THINK the original fitment of an oil filter is on the side of the block? Mine it vertical, threads on the bottom (so dumps oil when you remove it) but I think this is because of the adapter that allows the oil pressure sending unit to be installed? Either way - my oil filter is vertical and 1 of the hard lines on this new fuel pump pushes against the oil filter.
-I have a new exhaust manifold gasket arriving tomorrow, along with OE in-line fuel filter. I'll pick up some new fuel line tomorrow too since I'm eliminating the FRAM in-line filter (will replace the line that has a gap in it)
-any easy way to confirm if my leak is the smog system vs exhaust manifold?
-To clarify - I got screwed on the first FJ60 I bought and then basically gave it away to a guy who was going to do a frame off resto. The FJ60 I am asking about now is "new" to me, I bought a year ago but haven't had time to get it all how I want it to be.

PS - I appreciate everyone's input already and am just glad that after this thing sat for months, it is firing up and running.
 
Joined
Dec 22, 2020
Messages
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NC
1B if there is no spacer on the stock pump it will not pump gas, so if it is running that is not the problem does the pump have 3 hardlines on the top of it?
Thanks - I must not have a spacer then.
 
Joined
Dec 22, 2020
Messages
40
Location
NC
Pictures of your fuel pump and spacer would help us know what you have. You could temporarily swap in an electric fuel pump for test purposes, leaving the return lines in place on the OEM mechanical pump.

Also, many/all 60s need a manifold gasket - it's a rite of passage. But, be sure (as Spock mentioned) that it's not an air pump fitting issue.

And, finally, it's not an 'FJ' - that is a 2 door 4runner variant (FJ Cruiser) sold in the 2000s - you have an 'FJ60' or '60'. Later, you will own a '40' and an '80', and your wife will observe that you driveway is full of old trucks.....

I will get a photo of the part I pulled off when I get home today. This is the part I installed - https://www.oreillyauto.com/detail/...16/1985/toyota/land-cruiser?q=fuel+pump&pos=2
 
Joined
Dec 22, 2020
Messages
40
Location
NC
You can check my thread on head removal for what is involved in getting the manifold on / off... just skip the part with removing the head :bang:

Carburator / Manifold / Head Removal

Since it is a "new to you" truck, once you get the fuel issue sorted, I would do a complete tuneup and perform the new cruiser baselining activities:

1. Fuel filter (you are already on that)
2. Cap / wires / rotor spark plugs - at least inspect them, check the plug gap, measure the resistance of the wires
3. Look at your vacuum lines - if they are the originals or cracked, replace with the silicone lines from mcmaster carr (you need about 50 feet of line to do everything). Reference the emissions manual and check the routing of all of the vacuum lines. Many times a previous owner may have things connected incorrectly
4. Check and adjust the timing
5. Check and adjust the valve clearance (replace valve cover gaskets while you are at it)
6. Inspect / replace the PCV valve
7. Get a vacuum gauge and measure your vacuum at idle - this will tell you if you have a leak somewhere (especially if you have not done #3)
8. Compression test on all cylinders and record the findings (for future reference as a baseline)
9. Inspect all the coolant hoses (there are 2 under the truck that go to the rear heater) - if any of them look shady or they appear to be really old, replace them all. There is no idiot light in a cruiser for temperature and if one of those hoses blows on the freeway, you may not notice until it is too late
10. Check all the belts and replace if necessary

Good Luck!
This is super helpful - thanks for this list. I was driving home from cars and coffee in the Spring and noticed the temp gauge getting VERY high. I slowly made it home and found that my overflow tank was empty. I have filled it twice (top off w. water) and it keeps ending up empty - I can't do a pressurized leak test since the lid fits so loosely on the overflow - any other ideas on how best to search for a leak? I either have a leak or have a system that's more water than antifreeze and i'm boiling off the water (if that's possible?)

Thanks again for this list! --> I am pretty comfortable with mechanics and have an adequate set up in my garage at home - would you say this is all something a DIYer can do, especially with FSM on hand? I have never done timing before but I know it's gear driven on the 2F vs a chain or belt.
 
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Get an FSM, available free to download here on Mud. start going over it. Pretty simple. By Setting the timing, on this truck, you are adjusting (twisting) the distributor. Not talking about a timing belt or chain- its a gear driven engine with push rods. You'll need a timing light for this.

Overheating = BAD. you do not want to over heat a FJ60, or any engine for that matter. need to figure out where your coolant is going and why.

good luck!
 

lcolon

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I can't do a pressurized leak test since the lid fits so loosely on the overflow

To pressure test the cooling system you do it from the radiator not the overflow bottle. You remove the radiator cap (when cold) and pump the system up to about 13psi. Any leaks should reveal themselves. You can use a tool like this: MityVac MV4560

Agreed that you do not want to run these vehicles hot. Definitely look for the source of your leak. If a pressure test shows that it is not leaking, then I would try burping the system properly (raise the front end, I usually use ramps), open both heaters full blast, and keep the radiator topped off. It is super helpful to have a detachable coolant funnel when burping a cruiser: Spill proof coolant funnel

Good luck and keep posting. Definitely download the FSM. You can also get the max ellory (sp?) book on Amazon for land cruisers.
 

lcolon

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One more thing - if you do not get something obvious from pressurizing the cooling system, then I would use a chemical block tester for the cooling system (you can get one at napa) to see if you are getting any emissions gasses that would indicate a head gasket leak. If you have compressed air, you can also do a leak down test on the cylinders.

Everything described above can be done at your home with basic shop tools and some of this specialty testing equipment mentioned. The test equipment is worth its weight in gold and will pay for itself many times over vs. going to a mechanic.

Before you take the manifold off - get to the bottom of your cooling issue. If you have a leaking head gasket you will be most of the way there to pulling the head.

Note that overheating issues can be things other than the cooling system: incorrect engine timing or a intake leak (causing the motor to run lean) can contribute to overheating. If an intake leak is suspected, you can spray around the motor with carb cleaner and listen for a change in idle RPM indicating the source of the leak.
 
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g-man

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wash the block where the fuel pump mounts to it. Use solvent, brake clean, etc and a tooth brush. Get all the grease off it and see if you can see the spacer.


pull your spark plugs and make sure they are not being washed clean with coolant...ie coolant in the cylinder(s). In any case they may show something else...take them out and keeping them in order take a pic of them...some may be fouled causing a miss and rough running condition.

do a compression test.

Make sure the fuel in the site glass at the front of the carb is around the 1/2 way mark.

Look down into the carb and make sure fuel is squirting down the venturi when you crank the throttle linkage by hand at the back of the carb.

Make sure each spark plug has spark and the firing order is correct.

Posting detailed pics of your engine bay will help ...you will be surprised to see what people find....like loose vacuum lines, missing or broken parts...on and on.
 
Joined
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One more thing - if you do not get something obvious from pressurizing the cooling system, then I would use a chemical block tester for the cooling system (you can get one at napa) to see if you are getting any emissions gasses that would indicate a head gasket leak. If you have compressed air, you can also do a leak down test on the cylinders.

Everything described above can be done at your home with basic shop tools and some of this specialty testing equipment mentioned. The test equipment is worth its weight in gold and will pay for itself many times over vs. going to a mechanic.

Before you take the manifold off - get to the bottom of your cooling issue. If you have a leaking head gasket you will be most of the way there to pulling the head.

Note that overheating issues can be things other than the cooling system: incorrect engine timing or a intake leak (causing the motor to run lean) can contribute to overheating. If an intake leak is suspected, you can spray around the motor with carb cleaner and listen for a change in idle RPM indicating the source of the leak.

Thanks for this! I have a few different test tools and think those that I don't have are free rentals at parts stores - I should only need a leak down and radiator pressure test kit.

If I pressurize the radiator - won't it push into the overflow so that also has to be sealed? Or is it closed off thanks to the thermostat (when cold) so I'm effectively only testing the radiator to thermostat ?

Let's assume worst case - that I or the PO ran it hot and that's part of why it's running rough - I have no water in my oil but IF I had a minor leak starting at the head gasket - is this then a DIY project assuming there is no internal damage and I just need to replace that gasket? I know that's a bigger job but as lcolon already documented - it does look doable and his thread would certainly help.
 
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wash the block where the fuel pump mounts to it. Use solvent, brake clean, etc and a tooth brush. Get all the grease off it and see if you can see the spacer.


pull your spark plugs and make sure they are not being washed clean with coolant...ie coolant in the cylinder(s). In any case they may show something else...take them out and keeping them in order take a pic of them...some may be fouled causing a miss and rough running condition.

do a compression test.

Make sure the fuel in the site glass at the front of the carb is around the 1/2 way mark.

Look down into the carb and make sure fuel is squirting down the venturi when you crank the throttle linkage by hand at the back of the carb.

Make sure each spark plug has spark and the firing order is correct.

Posting detailed pics of your engine bay will help ...you will be surprised to see what people find....like loose vacuum lines, missing or broken parts...on and on.
Thanks - I will get some photos when I get back today. It's not pretty and lots of gunk on the block which worried me that there was a previous leak from a critical gasket - will see what people say when I post photos.
 

lcolon

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If I pressurize the radiator - won't it push into the overflow so that also has to be sealed? Or is it closed off thanks to the thermostat (when cold) so I'm effectively only testing the radiator to thermostat ?

Let's assume worst case - that I or the PO ran it hot and that's part of why it's running rough - I have no water in my oil but IF I had a minor leak starting at the head gasket - is this then a DIY project assuming there is no internal damage and I just need to replace that gasket?

The fitting for the pressure tester will not allow fluid to go to the overflow bottle - so that is not a concern. The pressure test is done with the engine off and stone cold. You fit the adapter onto the radiator and pump it up with the pump. If there are any leaks, you will see coolant streaming out of the leak location.

If you do have a blown head gasket and pull the head off - note that the job is a little more involved and you will need a friend to help get that heavy head out. Once it is out, you will need to send the head to a machine shop for at minimum a pressure check, magnaflux, and a check for straightness. At that point, you might as well have the head rebuilt properly - replace the valve stem seals, have the valves ground / replaced as necessary, and have the head decked. Have the intake manifold checked for straightness and decked at the same time.

The rebuilding process of the head is not cheap - it will probably cost at a minimum $600-700 (could be less or more based on where you live). You can call around to your local machine shops to get an idea of what the price will be. Or buy a rebuilt head exchange off of a mud member or another place that is local to you. The head gasket itself is also pricy (I got mine at City Racer).

Before you go there on that bigger job - get through the other diagnostics and baselining first. This is just to give you an idea of what you will be getting into.
 

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