1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Shackle bolt and bushing removal

Discussion in '40- & 55-Series Tech' started by mtnbiker, Aug 25, 2003.

  1. mtnbiker

    mtnbiker

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2003
    So, I'm replacing my rear springs on my fj62 and in the midst of removing the old springs. The problem is that I can't get the shackle bolts out on either end of the springs. I have beat on the bolts to no avail and they don't seem to want to move at all. I've made sure that I have all the tension off the spring. I was planning on burning out the old bushings but I thought I did that AFTER I got the shackle bolts out. ??? Do I burn them out first or what? Also, the muffler canister is in the way of the drivers side rear and I can't seem to get a good angle on the bolt unless I remove the muffler, is there a better way?
     
  2. hammerhead

    hammerhead

    Messages:
    1,995
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2003
    Location:
    Central, Utah
    If they are badly rusted you may need to hose them with penetrating oil every day for a week. If I were you I'd probably replace the shackles and bolts with the greasable type. I think they are readily available aftermarket. I've seen them in SOR and MAF.
     
  3. 1973Guppie

    1973Guppie

    Messages:
    8,738
    Media:
    31
    Likes Received:
    619
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    "the whale's vagina", CA
    Heat helps, mine came off with a lot of ratcheting, it eventually screwed out.

    Noah
     
  4. cruiser_guy

    cruiser_guy

    Messages:
    11,209
    Likes Received:
    22
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2003
    Location:
    Wherever the truck stops!!
    I just did my '82 BJ60 and I KNOW what you're talking about :D. It can be a real pain. If you burn out the bushings you do it while it is still on the truck. After the springs are off the truck who cares about the shackles/bushings (assuming that you'll go with greaseable shackles and pins). You can get the shackles and pins from SOR for about $200 all around and then you don't need to worry about keeping the shackles in a reusable state. I used my crow bar, small sledge, big "C" clamp, claw hammer and anything else that might work to pull pry or whatever to remove the shackles and pins.
    One thing to be aware of is that the shackles will try to invert when you're finished (at least my rear ones did). I just used a crow bar to straighten them as I was lowering the truck.
     
  5. fr8train

    fr8train

    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2003
    Location:
    Maryland
    I have a FJ40 and a K5 Blazer. Both trucks, I just burned the bushings out.
     
  6. dd113

    dd113

    Messages:
    2,923
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2003
    Fire, Fire, Fire, Hammer, Hammer, hammer, drink, repeat. No easy way. Gotta love the 62 muffler design that prevents you from getting to the shackle bolts from any good angle! You can cut them in 1/2 with a torch or a sawzall and use a 1/2" drift to pound them out. Usually works best when they are on fire. Dont buy the shackles fro SOR. Get them from CCOT. Better quality and nicer people.
     
  7. jeremymayf

    jeremymayf

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2002
    I sympathize with you--took the shackles off my '74 40 earlier this summer. I don't think they had ever been removed. Tried a regular hammer and chisel-- ::) yea right . . . graduated to a 3lb . . . then a 5lb . . . then the air powered hammer chisel . . .etc. Heat was a last option for me--the oxy-acet. torch was far from where I was working at the time. I found a pickle fork (the tool for separating tie rod ends) worked well on the particularly stubborn pins. In fact, it worked so well that I started shimming the pickle fork instead of returning to pounding after the pin had come out as far as the width of the fork. It does ruin the shackles, but they are going to be replaced anyway.
    good luck!
     
  8. dogboy

    dogboy

    Messages:
    156
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2002
    Having just done this on my '60, here's some things I picked up while doing mine:

    1) soak/drench all parts to be removed with a penetrating oil i.e. LiquidWrench, etc... prior to even trying to move the parts -- bushings too, especially at the shackle/bushing connection. The oil will soak into the cavity between the bushing and the shackle pin and help break the rust and lube it for easier removal

    2) place the end of a medium sized pry bar (about 20-24" long) inbetween the bushing and the shackle plate and apply pressure while tapping on the protruding pin threads (assuming that you won't be reusing the shackles - HIGHLY recommend replacing with greasable pins and shackles as the difficult removal of the old ones is probably related to heavy corrosion of the pins). If tapping on the threads doesn't work, loose the pry bar and try driving the plate off with blows from a 4-5 lb. hand-held sledge hammer. Placing a short length of 2x4 against the plate and hammering that allows for direct transfer of the blow to the plate if you can't get the head of the hammer directly on the plate itself.

    3) if the above fails, grab a propane torch and heat the s#%t out of it, fry the bushings, etc... and then try the prying/direct hammer techniques again. Had one stubborn shackle that wouldn't respond to anything until we super heated it and expanded all the parts -- it came flying off with the first blow of the hammer.

    4) once you get it to move out enough to get your fingers around it, you might be able to just reef it out by twisting and rocking it back and forth as you pull. Some of mine were actually easier to get out by this method once they got started with a little persuasion from the above techniques

    5) my pins came out easily with no load placed on the spring. The shackles however, required some manipulation with the OEM bottle jack placed under the leaf assembly, just forward of the axle housing, raised slightly to put a slight deflection in the spring arch (flattened out). I just played with this relationship using the jack until the tension between the shackle and the spring became neutral, and took the pressure off of the shackle pin allowing the shackle plate to be driven out easily. Same goes for the install -- bottle jack was the key tool for an easy install.

    6) don't reuse your old parts, especially if they show any signs of corrosion. The greasable shackles and pins from Man-A-Fre or Spector are worth their weight in gold.

    7) muffler issue: had it on the '60 as well. Disconnect the muffler hanger bracket at the very rear of the exhaust, near the tailpipe. If that won't give you enough play to pull the pipe down out of the way, then also disconnect the hanger bracket/strap just aft of the muffler. Once I had disconnected both of these, I was able to pull (with some muscle) the tailpipe down far enough to access the shackle plate/nuts and without compromising the welds on the exhaust system. It won't stay that way -- you have to hold it down out of the way while you drive the plate out so another pair of hands is really helpful.

    8) grease the inside of the new bushings and the pins of the new hardware well prior to reassembly which helps quite a bit and saves damage to your new bushings

    Hope it helps,

    -dogboy- '87 FJ60
     
  9. fsusteve

    fsusteve

    Messages:
    3,802
    Media:
    18
    Likes Received:
    49
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2003
    Location:
    Naples/Big Pine Key, Fl
    Torch, baby, torch. I tried every other method, all a waste of time, use the gas wrench. :eek:
     
  10. zetasig

    zetasig

    Messages:
    1,419
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2002
    Location:
    Hiding
    I second or third the hot wrench way, mine were from a 68 fj 40. Nut busters all of them. :mad:
    If you dont have a torch, get a bernzomatic with MAPP gas. Twice as hot as propane.
     
  11. arutgers

    arutgers

    Messages:
    88
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Annen, the Netherlands
    Replaced the shackles a month ago with greasables ones. Used a bench-vise to push the bolts out of the bushings.
    Ton
     
  12. mtnbiker

    mtnbiker

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2003
    Thanks for all the help guys! I got them out using the ol' flame, flame, drink, drink, hammer, drink method. Things will go together much better and faster, I hope.

    Steve
     
  13. mtnbiker

    mtnbiker

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2003
    ~Update #2~

    Finished the spring upgrade and after getting everything sorted out it went pretty smooth. The original broken spring was almost totally dead and basically fell apart when I removed it. One of the spring clamps had broken off at some point in its life and nearly half of the springs had cracks in them. The second spring was fine but from what I could tell in a quick inspection, the top springs were cracked as well. Things I've learned from this little deal:

    1) The Haynes book was invaluable in step by step, especially since this was my first major repair on my truck since I got it 3 months ago.

    2) Greasable shackle pins and shackles ARE worth there weight in gold. Spector came through like a dream, as did Cool Cruisers of Texas with my springs.

    3) Spraying anything and everything with penetrating oil made my work MUCH easier. No need to cut, heat, burn, grind anything off because I soaked the crap out of it for about a week before I started to work on it.

    4) The internet is amazing when it comes to finding people that know everything about anything and will help you without knowing who the hell you are. Any question I could think of was answered within the hour, seriously.

    Thanks again for all your help everybody.
     
  14. lndcrzr71

    lndcrzr71

    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2003
    dd113 you got it perfect torch,hammer,crowbar,DRINK.take the torch and heat the head side of the shackle bolt for a while it should heat the whole bolt inside of the bushing thus melting it from the inside out that usually works ok
     
  15. MR.FJ60

    MR.FJ60

    Messages:
    565
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2004
    Location:
    Westminster,CO
    Thanks you very much guy's I'm curently changing my leaf springs and this helped out a LOT.
     
  16. FineWynsFJ40

    FineWynsFJ40 Good Ol' Eff-Jay-Farty

    Messages:
    1,364
    Media:
    9
    Likes Received:
    19
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2005
    Location:
    Spring Lake, MI
    How do I tell if my springs are neutralized? Is there some secret or just trial and error? Thanks.
     
  17. bsevans

    bsevans Focus on the Journey

    Messages:
    2,009
    Media:
    50
    Likes Received:
    13
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Location:
    Southern Arizona
    WOW!! This thread really makes me appreciate living in the southwest desert. I mean they offered some resistance but with a little persuasion they came out.

    It really pays to put greasable shackles and pins in. Not only will they come out when you want to change out the bushings, but you suspension will have more flex. Just think about how much those bushings welded to your bolts and hangers dampened the flex of your springs.
     
  18. rusty_tlc

    rusty_tlc Dain Bramaged Member

    Messages:
    12,997
    Media:
    3
    Likes Received:
    584
    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2005
    Location:
    Reno, NV
    I don't know if this is the "approved" method but here is what I did. Since you will be using jack stands to suypport the rig you won't have fine control of the spring loading.
    Jack the rig until the wheels just clear the ground, lower it until they just touch. Adjust your jack stands as close as possiable to support the frame at this height. Ssince the springs are slightly in extension pick the lower of the two possiable settings. Jack the rig back up and get it on the jack stands.

    For bolt removal I use a 3' crow bar and a dead blow hammer. Pry on the spring and tap until you find the sweet spot where the bolt moves, then whack the snot out of the bolt. Use a drift pin to finish. Worked great on mine after they had been in for ten years with no service, but I live in the desert.
     
  19. JDSherr

    JDSherr

    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2005
    another technique

    i've found that reaming the bushings around the pin with a 1/4 drill bit makes for a very speedy removal of the shackle side, but for the front side i've had to resort to either burning(yuck). or using a heavy duty sawzall blade (more burning-Whee!)
    fun and games never end....
     
  20. FishTacos

    FishTacos Is never taken seriously

    Messages:
    1,229
    Likes Received:
    668
    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2012
    Location:
    Central New Jersey
    On my 40 I used a cheapo pitman arm puller. Ok.....so I pounded it a bit first. Then I put the puller on the inboard side of the perch and it drove the top pin half way out, I repositioned the puller jaws onto the outboard side of the perch and the pin drove out completely. No burning rubber. haven't done this on my 60 yet so Im not sure this puller will work with those spring perches.