rust preventative vs epoxy primer

Discussion in 'Paint and Body' started by troy scott, Jun 9, 2018.

  1. troy scott

    troy scott SILVER Star

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    i have a question about primers or base coat rust preventative. im not a auto body man or painter ive hired a painter. He has primed all my parts in a zinc base primer that we agreed to a few years ago. Fast forward to now, i have him working on the tub he has done the body work and its prime time. he doesn't want to use the zinc primer he says its thick and clogs stuff up his words were "im not a fan" he says an epoxy primer over clean metal is all i need. on anything else i would agree, but the curse of the fj40 rust scares me to death. Ive been working on this project for a decade i don't want to ever have to do this again. whats your opinion should i insist on the zinc or am i being paranoid. He is the body man and a good friend of mine, and has been with me since the start of this project. He is right that stuff is nasty thick and kinda tough to sand. I wish i had the name of it but i don't have that with me. The tub is media blasted and clean. whats your opinion should i insist on the zinc or am i being paranoid.

    Thank you for your time taken to respond!
     
  2. Splangy

    Splangy SILVER Star

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    I don’t think anybody here can recommend the zinc without knowing what product it is.

    That said, it’s probably not doing much besides adding to the film thickness of your paint system. You’re not going to beat an epoxy in terms of adhesion and the zinc isn’t going to do anything unless your paint is chipped and exposes the steel/zinc to moisture.

    The only place on the body I would consider using a zinc paint is on the bottom of the tub/fenders.

    You mentioned that the body work is done. Does that mean the body filler has been applied and blocked? The zinc needs to be in contact with the steel for it to provide protection. It won’t do anything if applied over bodywork.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2018
  3. troy scott

    troy scott SILVER Star

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    by done with body work i ment done welding in patches and my new rear quarters i guess thats far from done LOL no mud work yet if the zinc is a good idea on the bottom and under the fenders why not the whole tub for added protection not the dash i understand that but i had more rust on the top of my floor than the bottom
     
  4. Splangy

    Splangy SILVER Star

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    The floors might also be suitable if you’re expecting to scratch them up. Again, the zinc doesn’t do anything besides add to the thickness of the paint system, drain your wallet, and make your paint guy’s life miserable if the steel doesn’t see moisture from the environment. I assume you don’t plan on scratching the rest of the body up to bare steel.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2018
  5. troy scott

    troy scott SILVER Star

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    ok thank you for your time
     
  6. PAToyota

    PAToyota Keystone Cruisers SILVER Star

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    From working with architectural (building) products, the zinc paint is a toss-up. It definitely isn't the same as galvanizing something. I'd tend to agree with Splangy that a good epoxy primer is going to do a better job of sealing things up and be neater than the zinc paint on bodywork. If you're concerned about the underside, use a spray bedliner on the underside to give it more abrasion resistance.

    Floorboards are likely rusty from water getting in and then sitting there. Carpet or padding can be horrible for that. They act like a sponge and just hold the water there against the metal instead of allowing it to evaporate. That's why a lot of people with open-top or removable top vehicles will use a bedliner on the interior as well.
     
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  7. troy scott

    troy scott SILVER Star

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    thank you for your reply i am also putting bed liner top and bottom i am convinced that the epoxy is the way to go
     
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