Is this sidewall?

Battleship

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Got a nail through the tire, one shop said it was in the sidewall and wouldn't fix it. Anybody out there think differently?

I don't feel like dropping $175 on a new tire that I'd like to replace anyway, but don't have the $800 for a new set right now. Might pull it and try to plug it, never used fix-a-flat before. I don't take it off-road (if that wasn't obvious from the tire).

Thanks for the help.
sidewall.jpg
 
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Lazy tire shop that wants to sell you a tire instead of a repair. I'd repair it and put it on the rear of the truck only just as a precaution and obviously be more diligent than usual about checking pressure frequently.

DougM
 

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Don't know that the tire shop was "lazy".. I go to Discount, have for years, they now have a display in their stores that shows the the outside treadline of the tires as un-repairable. I think they are claiming a safety thing in order to sell tires. If you have a road hazard warranty with them, they eat it though.

I personally think it is bull, and that you can repair it yourself or take it to a non corporate shop without a legal department.
 
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Most tire shops are not going to touch that based on "safety"

If it were mine I'd plug it myself. You should do what your comfortable with.

Fix-a-flat would probably seal that. But it will make a mess on the inside for whom ever puts a new tire on down the road.
 
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Technically that is considered the shoulder of the tire. The reason that tire shops will not repair this, like Corbet said, is for safety issues. As you may or may not know the tread part of the tire is made of steel and nylon cords, along with other things, that form a "belt package". This is what makes your tires keep their shape and their durability. These cords do not extend over the entire surface of the tire because the shoulder, which is where it looks like your nail is, is made of end caps which are not nearly as strong as the treads composition. I have worked at a tire shop for over 4 years now and have plenty of experience in this stuff so maybe this will help you out. Tire shops are not trying to take your money just keep you safe.
 
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You can try plugging it yourself, but if you plan on keeping them for a while, you should have repaired using a combination plug patch :cool:


tireplugpatch.jpg



Regular plugs work, but they reduce the speed rating and there's the slight chance that it can be ripped out as the tire wears :doh:

Regular patches leave an open hole that allows moisture to enter, causing the cords to rust and eventually deteriorate :eek:

Combination plug patches don't reduce the speed rating and seals the hole, making them the best solution :)

Even if you can't find a shop to do it, at least have one break the tire down so you can do it right yourself :cool:
 
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If that's truly on the shoulder the only reliable repair will be an inner tube. I've had the unhappy experience of a nail in the shoulder and neither patches nor plugs nor cooked plugs nor cooked patches would hold due to the constant flexing of the tire in use. If you want to keep using that tire, find the correct size inner tube.


Kalawang
 

Battleship

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my tires have free replacement and a nail in that spot got me a new tire. If you are going to use a plug it should also be patched on the inside.


How much disparity in tire size (due to tread wear) can you get away with? I had a Volvo XC and most people on the Volvo board recommended that you not have two tires on the same axle that were more than 50% different in tread wear or you would risk damage to the 4WD system. I'm wondering if you get a new tire with road hazard protection, you might need to buy another tire to match it anyway.
 
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Find someone that will patch it and then if its not the rear tire then make it one of the rear tires.
I had a slice on the sidewall just past the edge of the tread two shops (disount tire was one ) said NOPE !! without even tacking it of the rim. Then the third shop said (lets take a look on the inside to see what size the cut really is) well it was a pin hole. They patched it and have not had a problam since. Needless to say I only go to them know and the owner was a GM at discount tire before going out on his own.
 

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Used a container of tire gunk over two years ago to repair what looked to be large staple gun holes from wood pallets, so pulled out a couple, removed the valve stem only to discover that the real culprit was a 3/8" bolt.

Thinking oh crap I am screwed, went ahead and filled the tire with this yellow gunk and air, honestly aside from some initial leakage from that bolt hole this tire has never caused an issue.

That little nail of yours will be forgotten...
 
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Used a container of tire gunk over two years ago to repair what looked to be large staple gun holes from wood pallets, so pulled out a couple, removed the valve stem only to discover that the real culprit was a 3/8" bolt.

Thinking oh crap I am screwed, went ahead and filled the tire with this yellow gunk and air, honestly aside from some initial leakage from that bolt hole this tire has never caused an issue.

That little nail of yours will be forgotten...

Doesn't that gunk muck up your air valve ? Also does it harden over time and cause a noise in the tire ?


kalawang
 
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And that gunk does wonders at adding lots of corrosion to aluminum wheels, which by the time you have forgotten about that nail, the corrosion will cause leaks where the tire is supposed to seal against the wheel.
If you get it fixed by a good shop without a legal department, that is fine. Just make sure it is a proper repair. Don't use any instant fix type of spray in sealer. A properly vulcanized plug/patch would probably work, and if it doesn't, then purchase your new tire.
 

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