Hannibal roof racks: how good?

Discussion in 'Camping and Outdoor Gear' started by e9999, Jun 30, 2004.

  1. e9999

    e9999 You want to do what...? Moderator

    Messages:
    15,192
    Location:
    PRK
    would anybody care to comment on the quality, pros and cons of Hannibal roof racks compared to the aftermarket competition?
    thanks
    E
  2. Junk

    Junk

    Messages:
    6,210
    Location:
    buggerville nj
    I've stated my opinion in the 80's section several times. I know there are several threads in that forum related to racks, so you may want to search.
  3. e9999

    e9999 You want to do what...? Moderator

    Messages:
    15,192
    Location:
    PRK
    did actually, but comments seen were mostly having to do with cost and weight, not so much with durability, quality etc

    will look again

    E
  4. esh

    esh

    Messages:
    1,971
    Location:
    Oregon
    Worth every penny imho.

    I like:

    - the rail down the gutter to distribute the weight evenly
    - the aluminum yet beefy build (weight)
    - tent fitment

    I dont like the cost and the fact that there's a serious shortage of them right now. I think the San Diego folks overextended themselves. Two months and I'm still waiting on a tent.
  5. firetruck41

    firetruck41

    Messages:
    5,736
    Location:
    Camas, WA USA
    If you're spending that kind of dough, take a look at the African Outback rack Slee is selling as well.
  6. Riley

    Riley

    Messages:
    1,603
    Location:
    Fort Langley, BC
    I've got a half rack Outback and I love it.
  7. dd113

    dd113 Supporting Vendor

    Messages:
    2,838
    They are nice, they rattle and work loose over time. They are very expensive. I would look into making your own. You should be able to get exactly what you want for less money from a commercial welding shop. Look into the ARB racks, Hanniable, INTI, Brownchurch, Kaymar, and outback. Every rack has good and bad points. If you combine features from all of them you can get a great rack.
  8. Exiled

    Exiled

    Messages:
    1,835
    Location:
    Round Rock, TX
    I agree 100%. The biggest focus for a homemade rack should be weight, strength and rigidity. You don't want it overbuilt (common mistake), and you don't want it too rigid or it will rip the rain gutter right out if tweaked sideways. Tough repair, and expensive.

    A good roof rack should be easily manouvered by two people and be strong enough to hold both people up there, plus gear. Height should be as short as possible to keep wind resistance down, most roof racks play havoc with the 60 series's already atrocious fuel consumption.

    If you can swing aluminum fabrication, I think that's the best option.
  9. Riley

    Riley

    Messages:
    1,603
    Location:
    Fort Langley, BC
    >> If you can swing aluminum fabrication, I think that's the best option. <<

    Outback, powder coated aluminum. Light and strong.
  10. pound3151

    pound3151

    Messages:
    107
    Location:
    PA
    How much weight can the gutters on an 80 hold if the weight is properly distributed? Also, with a home made rack, would it be any better to bolt into the area where the stock roof rack mounts?
  11. Exiled

    Exiled

    Messages:
    1,835
    Location:
    Round Rock, TX
    I would stay away from drilling into the roof, there's no need for it and there will be dire consequences (rust, leaks).

    A well designed, well built roof rack will be *very strong*. My rack has an aluminum frame with steel clamps (six) and a light superstructure of steel tubing, and I've had four hefty Cruiserheads on top of it, probably close to 800 lbs. I think it would hold more, but I don't like carrying much weight up there, roof racks are for the bulky, hard-to-store items, not to haul freight around.

    I have a friend who uses his FZJ80 for long-range expeditions and he routinely carries between 400-500 lbs of gear, including 35 gallons of liquid and a full-size spare tire up there.

  12. >> Also, with a home made rack, would it be any better to bolt into the area <<
    >> where the stock roof rack mounts? <<

    No. Use the gutters.

    -B-
  13. scottm

    scottm

    Messages:
    2,550
    Location:
    Third Coast, USA
    I'm looking into building a homemade rack. I build a lot of machine frames with 80/20 aluminum extrusions, http://www.8020.net/, it's very strong and versatile. The 1.5" x 3" stuff I usually use is heavy, the 1" x 2" is less common and therefore more $, but much lighter. The attachment options are endless, there are thousands of companies making these extrusions and compatible attachments. All my Thule stuff would just bolt down without modification. The towers are the only complicated part, but that's the kind of stuff I do at work anyway, so I'll come up with something. I'd really like to use a plywood floor, like this: http://www.carpages.co.uk/land_rove...n_quality_roof_rack_for_defender_18_02_04.asp
    but a smaller floor. The aluminum rails I'm seeing for floors seem overly complicated, too many welds and joints to go wrong.
  14. dclee

    dclee

    Messages:
    2,355
    Location:
    Left Coast, USA
    scottm -

    I have a feeling that rack has crossbars, just no solid floor like the steel mesh one on the ARBs and Kaymar/Tradesmans. So they add a plywood addition to allow you to more easily walk around or sleep up there. My Tradesman was the same way, and I didn't feel like paying an extra ~$200 for mesh flooring, so I use two sheets of 3/4" plywood, sealed, and that's my floor if I need one. But for simple load carrying, the crossbars are all you need, the flooring adds nothing to the load carrying capacity, just makes it easier to move around up there. On my rack, the crossbars are something like every 6" which is all you need.
  15. scottm

    scottm

    Messages:
    2,550
    Location:
    Third Coast, USA
    Could you go thinner than 3/4" plywood, that sounds heavy? I'm seeing lots of comments on weight. How do you fasten the plywood down? I'm thinking button heads into aluminum angle around the perimeter, the angle would fasten into the extrusion. Do you have any holes for drainage or fastening points? That might make it less comfortable for sleeping unless I provide fillers for the holes, hmmm.

    Rack sites comment on minimal crossbars for less wind noise, yours must have a lot of crossbars, noisy? I plan on making a wind deflector for the front.

    Feet or continuous rails? The rain gutters are amazingly beefy. I plan on wide feet, up to 12", to distribute load and reduce total supports needed. Multi-adjustable supports are a pain to design & build, heavy, more $. I love the Thule design, but it won't work. No answer on the max load question above, but I run over 500# on my Thule rack occasionally.

    How long, 6'? Up to 8' is no problem. The crossbars wouldn't have to go all the way to the front, but could if needed for oversize loads or sleeping platform. Sliding the crossbars back would cut wind noise and allow sunroof access when full length isn't needed. Four feet seems good for width, plus a little for hauling wood and using standard 4' sheets as flooring. How long & wide would be needed for a sleeping platform?

    How tall? My plan is something low profile that can be flipped to give 2" walls around the perimeter. Most expedition racks have a higher rail, easy enough to make one I guess.
  16. NorCalDoug

    NorCalDoug problems solved daily... SILVER Star

    Messages:
    6,125
    Location:
    uhhhh...duh...Northern CA
    Scott,
    Can I place a pre-order for one of the prototypes :D
  17. DRTDuck

    DRTDuck

    Messages:
    597
    Location:
    Boulder, CO
    I'm will be fabricating my own later this summer, I'm thinking about making a platform, like Hannibal or Africn Outback, as what stays on the vehicle all the time. Then make the rail so it is removable, maybe slips over the outside rail and locks into place with bolts or pins.

    Yes I would just make the verticle railes, but I have height issues living in the damn city.
  18. scottm

    scottm

    Messages:
    2,550
    Location:
    Third Coast, USA
    How tall is too tall? I think 1/2" from the highest point on the roof to the crossbar, then another inch of aluminum to the top in the low configuration. Another three inches in highest configuration.
  19. Owyhee Jackass

    Owyhee Jackass

    Messages:
    1,283
    Location:
    Boise, Id

    Yes you can go thinner if your well supported undernieth by tube. If you have a large span, say 2 feet, between supports than you'll want a thicker piece of plywood. You don't need to fasten the wood down, the gear your' hauling and your straps holding that gear will hold it down. When you aren't hauling gear you just remove the deck. It just acts as a sail and kills gas mileage.

    Personally I like trailers. I still use my rack when I shuttle boaters, I have a full trailer, full size rack with dry bags and paddles and a full 80.

    Here is a link to the rail supports I use http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product_list.asp?deptid=1379&ItemSort=VendorLogo

    They are called quick and easy, and they are, they are also inexpensive. The tube adapter is the same diameter as a Yakima crossbar, so there is a plus for Yakima accessories too.

    Another plus to the gutter mount system is you can transfer it to different vehicles, provided you design in some adjustment to the mount width. I have had mine on a Volvo 740, 240, 4-runner, 40, 55, and 80.
  20. Ba-Outfitters

    Ba-Outfitters

    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Burlington, Vermont
    Hannibal racks are overpriced.

    I made a rack for myself, then realized how many over-priced racks are out there that are made for mall-terrain vehicles and not for use. First of all if a Roof-Rack comes without a floor, It is made for show. Just my $.02

    I just got my web-site running, and would be happy to share my fab experience with these racks with anyone. a 42"x60"x6" weighs about 50 lbs
    Two people can install a 84"x60"x6" without too many problems.

    http://mysite.verizon.net/vze5cj9x/roof_racks.html


    Bill Atkinson
    BA Outfitters

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