Condensator (PCV Oil Catch Can) install and 1 month results

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Aug 10, 2004
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Yes, I know it's expensive and a cheap oil separator or oil catch can from FleaBay will work just as well for trapping oil, but there were a few reasons I went this route :meh:


1) I wanted a clear reservoir so I could easily see the oil level.

2) I wanted an extra LARGE reservoir so I wouldn't have to service it as often.

3) I wanted a removable reservoir for easy maintenance (drain cocks take too long and can be messy).

4) I wanted a deep reservoir that wouldn't let raw oil get sucked up when wheeling on steep inclines.
















Results after 1 month (3756 miles)










Keep in mind, my rig has over 324,xxx miles on the original HG running 10w-30 conventional oil
 

Pin_Head

 
 
 
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The problem with those gizmos is that they only catch a small amount of the total vapor going through the PCV hose. It is a spit in the bucket.
 
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The problem with those gizmos is that they only catch a small amount of the total vapor going through the PCV hose. It is a spit in the bucket.
I baffled my ebay catch can by taking the stainless steel braid off of a 3 foot long faucet hookup hose i got from the local freight salvage place for 45 cents.

It's pushed up through the throat of the inlet barb at one end and folded over, so the inlet hose clamps over the end of the braid jacket.

The other end is crimped off with a bit of copper wire.

It's sort of coiled and knotted in the top of the can.

After maybe 100 miles the way i initially set it up i decided that i didn't like the way i'd installed it and re-did it.

I Found the braid and the interior of the can greasy but not a puddle as such.

But the outlet hose was bone, chalky dry.
 
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any updates?

Here's a quick update.

Switched to Delvac 15w-40 for my last oil change about 3200 miles ago and drained the reservoir.

Here's what was caught since then:





Back when I was using 10w-30 ToyoOil, I would have to add a quart every 2000-3000 miles depending on how hard I pushed her.

I've been doing quite a bit of hard driving on the beach as of late (lots of WOT runs at steep dunes) and only had to add half a quart at 3000 miles using the Delvac......half of which appears to have been caught in the reservoir :cool:

 

Buckru

 
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Nice. I have had a Greddy on for about 115k and it works like a charm, albeit a pain to empty. I routed mine over to the right of the brake booster.

Mine's the same way on 40 weight.
 
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Here's what I got out of a 5k interval with the 15w-40 Delvac :eek:










Decided to swap over tot he plastic reservoir cause I'm afraid I'll drop the glass one when dumping it :doh:

I recetnly replaced the plugs and wires and had to pull the lines for access.

The PCV line was oily, but the intake line was bone dry :)
 
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Pics show results.... But whats the harm in a little oil in the intake path??
The pcv inlet is opposite the EGR inlet. This combination has led to EGR inlets that are completely blocked.

Which is a problem in california and other states that require your EGR system to work properly rather than just not throw a code.

Of course, you would want to catch more of the oil than just some of it.

May be interesting to see winter results, which i predict to be a lot wetter.
 

LandCruiserPhil

Peter Pan Syndrome
Supporting Vendor
 
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Pics show results.... But whats the harm in a little oil in the intake path??
The article below give a good overview of the system and reason to have it. My main reason for the install is to avoid the common 80 series EGR failure down the road.

PCV System Oil and Air Separator

The crankcase in a car is used as a storage place for oil, usually in a pan located below the crankshaft. While the crankshaft and the oil aren't intended to come into contact (because if they did the oil would get frothed up like a thick, black milkshake), oil vapors can still find their way into the blow-by gases. It's not a good idea for these oil vapors to be recirculated back into the cylinders along with the blow-by gases because they make the gas-air mixture too combustible, equivalent to lowering the octane of the gasoline, which in some engines can degrade performance slightly and in older engines can even cause backfire when the gas-air mixture combusts prematurely. The oil vapors can also coat the air intake with an oily film, gradually clogging the air flow over time. If you don't drive a high performance vehicle, these problems aren't exactly crucial to your car's operation and the oil build-up can be scrubbed out periodically during maintenance, but some people (and some car manufacturers) prefer to have something that will scrub the oil out of the blow-by gases before they're recirculated in the first place. Enter the oil and air separator.

The idea of an oil and air separator is to extract the oil from the air before it's sent back to the intake manifold and put it someplace where it won't cause a problem, either back in the crankcase or in a small receptacle called a catch can. Not all cars come with built-in oil separators and not all cars necessarily need them, but they can be purchased as aftermarket items. And if you have the necessary DIY skills, you can even make one yourself. There are actually a number of different ways in which these oil and air separators can work. Probably the most common kind blows the oily air through a mesh filter. The oil droplets are trapped in the mesh while the air passes through. The most effective such filters are made up of microfibers, which can trap very small particles of oil. Alternatively, the air and oil filter may require the recycled gases to go down a tube with holes in its side. The lighter air molecules escape through the holes, while the heavier oil droplets fall all the way to the bottom, where they can be removed. And some advanced systems use a centrifuge to drive the heavier oil droplets out of the air. The oil coalesces on the sides of the centrifuge and can be channeled back into the crankcase.
 
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Thanks for the article. So how many 80's have this installed?

If all the egr ports, intake, etc are cleaned as maint. is it as crucial?
 
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Not crucial, but if you've ever pulled an intake that hasn't been cleaned, you'll see the need for one. I've been considering a catchcan recently because I remember the mess that was there when I pulled mine and the work it took to clean it.
 

jcarter

 
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I've ordered a cheap air/oil filter for compressed air system and plan on installing that BEFORE I take off my throttle body through intake manifold to clean and replace fuel pressure regulator and fuel pulsation damper.

I was thinking that rigging something up with a mason jar would be cheaper and better (glass opposed to plastic). If plastic works better, a marshmallow cream jar may work nicely (the old glass ones are great for drinking whiskey from).

Seems like you could easily drill 2 holes in the top and rig up hose nipples out of it. I'll keep some bypass hoses and clamps in the glove box in case it fails. More to come. . . after the weather gets better.
 
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