Camshaft Position Sensor Bolts Broken

Thoughts:

  • You were too hard on that skinny bolt.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Did you feel any play before it broke?

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Get an extractor set and start drilling.

    Votes: 1 100.0%
  • Use Loctite to attach sensor onto the block.

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    1
Joined
Jul 29, 2018
Messages
24
Location
Birmingham, AL
While doing a Timing Belt and Water Pump replacement on my 2002 Land Cruiser over the last week, I snapped both of the long Camshaft Position Sensor bolts while trying to meet the FSM's torque specs. These things were FRAGILE, and now I have a serious bolt extraction problem.

The bolts are:
P#: 90109-06321 (Replaced by: 90080-10318)
P#: 90109-06320 (Replaced by: 90080-10317)

I have ordered the replacements bolts from Toyota Parts Deal, but they're a week away and so I have a few questions:
1. Is there any other warehouse or vendor in the South East that would stock these odd and specific bolts, so I could finish the repair quicker?
2. Any recommendation on extracting these small long thin mid-shouldered bolts (aside from a long and painful extractor screw process)
3. Have you ever heard of another bolt or attachment method for the 100 Series Camshaft Position Sensor?

Thanks for your help experts!

IMG_20190419_155335.jpg
 

aging fleet

Out adjusting my torsion bars
SILVER Star
Joined
Jul 30, 2014
Messages
1,028
Location
Columbus, OH
 
Regarding getting the bolts faster, for small stuff I need quickly, I go to my local dealership. They can typically have a part in stock within a few days. Expect to pay full retail though.

For the longer of the two studs, is there enough material left to screw on two nuts and try to back it out that way? If not, welding on a nut may be the best option. For the one that’s submerged, not sure what the best approach would be.
 
Joined
Aug 24, 2018
Messages
51
Location
Silver Spring, MD
I've broken a bolt in a manual transmission housing. The funny thing is I remember thinking "this seems like too much torque" just before the bolt snapped. My lesson learned was that the click style torque wrenches are inaccurate at both extremes of their range.
 
Joined
Jun 20, 2018
Messages
111
Location
Denver
Those are fragile bolts I leave them in and work around the connector, but regarding removal aging fleets idea I would go for on the longer bolt, for the recessed one small left handed drill bit and patients stay center use a center punch if it's broke off straight enough. If you broke it tightening a left hand bit should just pull it out without much effort
 
Joined
Sep 2, 2010
Messages
765
Location
Sarasota, Florida
 
What are the bolts screwed into? Havent had mine apart yet to see what's in there. Looks like some sort of nutserts mounted on the stamped cover........
If that is the case, remove cover, drill out old nutserts and install new ones or tack weld nuts on rear side.
 

abuck99

SILVER Star
Joined
Nov 8, 2015
Messages
3,725
Location
ATL
The one sticking out you should be able to get out with a little back & forth wiggling. The other, drill it with Cobalt drill bit.

What sort of torque wrench are you using, 1/4" right? Torque spec 66 inch pounds. If you stay on the light side of torque- use some blue locktite.
 
Joined
Jul 29, 2018
Messages
24
Location
Birmingham, AL
This is likely the cause. I mis-read the AllDataDIY walk-through and tried to torque to 10 ft pounds. Now I know what it feels like when you're over-tightening bolts. I have started drilling both with an Irwin drill bit and Left Hand extractor set.
 
Joined
Aug 15, 2016
Messages
1,448
Location
Orlando, FL
That part is removable ("Timing belt rear plate"), but you have to remove the belt and cam sprocket to get it off. Might be easier to just take the bits off and get at the bolts on your bench. Way less chance of messing things up that way, IMHO
 
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