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The wonders of birfeilds

Discussion in '80-Series Tech' started by Mr.Bryan, Mar 30, 2003.

  1. Mr.Bryan

    Mr.Bryan

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    No I didnt break one, but my question is: I am planning on doing a 3 week offroad trip through as much of colorado as I can, and: part 1, Should I carry an extra birfeild(s)? part 2: is it difficult to install a birfeild? I have never worked on anything like this before, and if something goes wrong am I going to be screwed?

    -Bryan
     
  2. Jim_Phillips

    Jim_Phillips

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    Whatever you leave behind will be the one thing you need.

    Cheers, Jim
     
  3. cruiserdan

    cruiserdan SupportingVendor Emeritus Supporting Vendor Moderator

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    Birfield failure in 80's is fairly un common. As Jim observed, you will now break one for sure! Field replacement is doable. It requires a decent jack, A hub nut socket and a fair assortment of metric tools. It goes easier if you have had one apart before under better conditions so you know what to expect. The trail is not the best place to train........
     
  4. Junk

    Junk

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    Mr Bryan - can't remember your truck setup, but unless you're wheeling with big tires, have a heavy foot etc, you should be fine. Now of course it also depends on mileage. This past summer, we were wheeling some mediocre stuff (others may call it hardcore) and one of my buds broke one - but he knew it was overdue for service and elected to wheel that way anyway.

    If you merely exploring in the woods and driving with 33's etc, then you should be fine.
     
  5. sleeoffroad

    sleeoffroad Supporting Vendor

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    This is what a Newfield looks like when it explodes :D

    [​IMG]

    If you do not know how to replace it, then it does not make much sense to carry a spare. I would say, try to repack the birfields before you go on a long trip. This will give you the knowledge to replace the birfield in the field. Also, it will show you what you need in the field in terms of parts & tools.
     
  6. Wrench

    Wrench One Bashed Up 80

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    ROFLMAO!!! Ain't that so true!! LOL!!
     
  7. Junk

    Junk

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    Christo, you try a Longfield yet? Whatcha got in the Yellow Thong (besides a :banana: ) :eek: :D Seriously, you gonna run stock till it breaks?

    I gotta rebuild my front end soon, and thinking about throwing in some Longfields and keeping the birfs I have right now as spares. :dunno:
     
  8. Wrench

    Wrench One Bashed Up 80

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    I don't see the sense in making the birfields stronger. All you are doing by making the birfields unbreakable is transfering the weak link to some other part. That will probably be harder and more expensive to replace. It could be the ring and pinion next to break. It's just alot easier to replace a birfiield than some other internal part.
     
  9. landtank

    landtank SILVER Star

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    Yes Wrench I've seen that in action. First the guy sees that the engine stalls to easily so he drops in some behemoth V8. Now he sees that the driveshafts have a breaking problem so he fabs up something from the QEII. And so on. But I have to admit it would be nice to have a driveline that was setup so the torque converter was the weak link. No damage just slip when at the extreme.

    Rick
     
  10. sleeoffroad

    sleeoffroad Supporting Vendor

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    Junk, still running stock with spares. Might go the Longfield route next time I have to take it appart.
     
  11. woody

    woody Internet Fireman Staff Member

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    I ran 2nd and 4th generation Newfields and did a good job of shattering them...problem is, most times a junked birfield or Newfield also buggers up your inner axle splines and you are out that as well.

    I now run longfields. The weak link is now the inner axle, most likely the short side since it can take less rotational twist. Since I was junking inners anyways, this becomes a cheaper replacement. I've watched Longs go thru some nasty stuff, even full throttle jumping, and the inners were what gave (both at once on one occasion).

    I could always replace a birfield/inner in about 30 minutes, but 1/3 that time was cleaning all the grease and shards from inside the knuckle....now, with an inner axle, you just pull the shaft, pull the busted stub from the Longfield (or grab a spare) and slip in the new one. No more knuckle clean time, getting me back to trail riding just that much quicker.

    Plus, with a clean snap of the inner axle, the inner seal should not junk out and the inside of the knuckle bell won't get more dings than it already has.

    Two HARD trips out and no breakage yet, VERY impressed thus far.

    Either way, you choose your weak point. Currently, my weak point is front inner axles. I carry two longs and 3 shorts, plus an old 4th gen Newfield to drop in.