1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

stone chip guard

Discussion in '60-Series Wagons' started by srplus, Jun 20, 2006.

  1. srplus

    srplus still breathing SILVER Star

    Messages:
    496
    Location:
    earth
    after seeing some of our cruisers with the snake blinders removed and holes left where the trim attached to the trucks, i got to thinking about vinyl application on cruisers. i wondered if anyone had used some of the stone chip guard vinyl products on the market today. 3M makes a pretty good one: Scotchcal Paint Protector Sheet - Transparent Chip Guard - Heavy duty, self adhesive clear urethane film to guard against stone chips on rocker panels, hoods and front and rear fenders. Described by the eastman company catalog (Phone (800) 345-1178): ). “Tough adhesive adheres well, yet can be peeled off without paint damage. Measures 3.75" wide by 75" long.” there are also other brands that have colors available and even have texture to them like rhino liner. i have never looked for this material before but am sure it is available at any quality paint and body supply house and prolly by now at auto zone or discount auto parts, etc. this stuff can also be applied to hoods as bug shields. it is almost like having rhino lining on the panels or hood that could be clear or almost any color and is easily removable.

    car manufacturers are putting this stuff on the bottom quarters and some rockers of a lot of trucks instead of the ‘snap on vinyl body panels’ since it is so much cheaper. any competent vinyl sign shop could cut this stuff on its vinyl plotter, if they had a pattern to cut it to. or, even cheaper you could lay a sheet of cardboard on the floor and put your paper pattern down on it (over the sheet of vinyl you want to cut) and do a number on it with a razor blade knife. turn the paper over and then cut one for the other side of the vehicle. or, put the vinyl face to face and then put the pattern on it (trace or lay pattern down), make sure nothing shifts (tape over edges with tabs of tape as you cut every so often or use the low adhesion double stick masking tape to hold them together) and cut it for both sides of the car all at once with your exacto knife. you can use this trick for cutting bookmarked interior body panels out of plywood or cardboard with a saw as long as your jig saw blade does not wander.

    for someone who wanted to get real fancy, you could apply the camo body vinyl or the zebra stripes and then put the clear body armor over it. i’m sure most of you have seen the trucks completely covered with the full printed decal advertising art… the chip guard is made of that same material just thicker. there is a beer truck that my shop did more than a decade ago that still looks good and we had to cut the material every 2” or so for the roll up doors to work. it is all in the prep and application. this stuff is also formable to shapes (complex convex and compound curves) if you follow the directions. they are even using this stuff on ipods!
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2006
  2. Texx

    Texx

    Messages:
    2,897
    I've used the spray on chip guard under the beltline on several 60's I restored in the past. Looked good, went on well, didn't keep em long enuff to give a long term review.
  3. bridges

    bridges

    Messages:
    432
    Location:
    Lago Vista, TX
  4. High Desert

    High Desert

    Messages:
    1,227
    Location:
    Central Oregon
    I've got the 3M clear on the front of my hood. We Have volcanic cinders on the roads up here in the winter, as in, DOT puts the down for traction in the snow. The stuff flys all over the place all winter and into the spring will sand blast leading edges and windshields. I put the 3m on the front of the Hood, works very good. the 3M has been hit hard enough to get cut but nothing has made it through to the paint.

    Good product, that and not driving it in the winter anymore, really keeps the finish nice...
  5. srplus

    srplus still breathing SILVER Star

    Messages:
    496
    Location:
    earth
    high desert

    where did you find the 3M... i have been only able to locate it in kit form or in narrow strips... i am sure 3M fabs this stuff out in 24" or 48" rolls.
  6. brett76

    brett76

    Messages:
    1,339
    Location:
    t town, wa
    look for a product called stonegaurd. samse stuff. this shop i used to work in used it. it stretches real nice they do mirror backs headlights fenders hoods whatever you wanted done. you couldnt even see the stuff when they were done. unless your car is FILTHY then you only see a little line where it ends. very easy to install
  7. High Desert

    High Desert

    Messages:
    1,227
    Location:
    Central Oregon
    A ski instructor friend at Mt Bachelor had a side biz doing detail and the 3m stuff. He had sheets and precut peices for some cars. He actually used "scraps" from a Mercedes for the leading edge of my 60. He wraped around the tops of the fenders too.

    Sorry I don't know where he got the stuff. Lots of detailers do the work though, I think mine cost $85.00. It's like putting in window tint, kinda hard to get the air bubbles out. I've seen kits too. forget where..sorry
  8. PAFJ

    PAFJ

    Messages:
    1,596
    Location:
    Olypen
    I ordered some 3m scotchguard clear film from here. I ordered 12 ft. of the 4 in. wide film, I figured that would be enough to do both rockers and a little extra. I'll post up with pics and details when finished installing.

    Here are some details on the product from the website:

    - Durable paint protection from frontal attacks of rocks, abrasions, bug acids and weathering
    - Does NOT affect vehicle’s appearance or aerodynamics
    - Helps maintain vehicle’s value
    - Endorsed by major auto manufacturers
    - Will NOT crack, yellow, shrink or peel
    - Removable if necessary
    - Will NOT harm paint
  9. Tinker

    Tinker

    Messages:
    2,847
    Location:
    Larkspur, CO
    3M clear bra ain't that easy to stretch correctly over compound curves.
  10. srplus

    srplus still breathing SILVER Star

    Messages:
    496
    Location:
    earth
    not THAT hard - a little easier than brain surgery - Vinyl Application Instructions -

    work slowly! follow instructions. you can use a hair dryer to soften the vinyl material (carefully - do not get it too hot) to assist in stretching to fit contours. don't expect miracles. It can stretch some but will not go over hard corners without wrinkles unless it is cut to fit the shape. don't overheat the decal material! try not to rush... work slowly!

    if installing this material or a decal on flat (not convex or concave) surfaces you can use a couple of drops of liquid Joy dishwashing liquid in a quart of water in a spray bottle with a small capful of denatured alcohol (not rubbing alcohol from the medicine cabinet) to make an application fluid solution. spray on the glue side of the film and the surface where you are applying it to… MAKE SURE THAT THE SURFACE IS COMPLETELY CLEAN FIRST. a tiny speck of dust or a grain of sand will look like crap under the decal material - like a HUGE ZIT on your forehead on Prom nite! on flat surfaces you can really soak down the surface and the adhesive side of the decal material. this makes repositioning or removal and reapplication easier (read: possible) if & when required. then when you have everything where it is supposed to be: thoroughly work out all liquid with squeegee. take the carrier paper (that the decal, stripe or stoneguard was attached to if it did not come 'pre-masked') and put the waxy side out and the paper side down, on the top of the properly positioned decal (if you are using a hard squeegee) to avoid scratching the decal. lightly mist first the top of the decal material before you put the carrier paper down (keeps paper from sliding around). then, mist the waxy side before using the squeegee. your paper shield will stay in place and the squeegee glides easily on the waxed surface. this is also the best way to apply window film using the clear carrier that it comes on to protect the film surface from scratches from the squeegee.

    If applying vinyl lettering or stripes on glass or metal: be very careful before applying any application fluid to the carrier masking tape (pre-mask) that covers them. you do not need to re-mask these materials to keep from scratching them since this is one of the functions of the application tape. application solution can degrade the 'rubber cement' masking/application tape so try to keep the paper side dry - no matter what. if decals or vinyl letters come with this masking type of application tape on them then it is often best not to get it wet at all. AND, if you are going to attempt to install them dry - you had better very carefully read and follow manufacturer’s installation instructions! several times before attempting.

    If you do want to use a wet application to avoid bubbles on curved surfaces with materials that come pre-masked: LIGHTLY mist only the adhesive side of the letters and/or the surface. After vigorously squeegeeing and allowing sufficient time, re-squeegee. Allow some time and re-squeegee again. make sure that all of the fluid has had a chance to evaporate from between the vinyl and the surface it is applied to before trying to remove any application tape carrier. Depending upon temperature and humidity sometimes this takes a couple of hours. again, go slowly and watch what you are doing! if the decal or letters start to come up around the edges as you peel the masking material off - you are trying to work too quickly. Re-squeegee down again and then slow down a little. give it a chance to adhere. Sometimes it is almost impossible to get some of the application masking tape off... no matter what. with very aggressive application tape, a light soaking of the paper surface with the application fluid immediately before trying to peel it off will make the removal much easier. spray it down thoroughly and rub it in... don't let it stay soaked for long before removing it AND squeegee down the material one more time. don't dilly - dally here... but be absolutely certain there is no fluid between the vinyl and the surface before doing this! peel the tape completely back on itself so that it is parallel to the surface you are removing it from and peel slowly. keep the squeegee in your other hand and hold down the decal material or letters you are peeling it away from. smooth and slow… no jerky motions or yanking.

    DO NOT work in the sun! NEVER try to apply decal material to cold metal - it will never adhere properly... metal that feels hot to the touch will cause decal material to be too pliable and it will stretch (and not how you want it to). Avoid dust at all costs. Read instruction even if you do not intend to follow them.

    when mixing application fluid: you know that you have enough liquid Joy in the solution if it feels ‘barely’ slippery between your fingers. if it feels like the slime on an eel then you probably have way too much soap in the solution and you need to either dump it out and start over or add more water. best to start with only one or two drops of Joy / quart in the solution. if it does not feel ‘barely slippery’ then add one drop more at a time (constantly mixing and retesting) until it is. If you do this you will not have any bubbles and your job will look professional. Many sign shops & window film guys use a commercial solution that they buy that is made of these same ingredients and smells like vanilla.

    you can use the liquid (wet application method) on concave / convex surfaces if you work very carefully, thoroughly and slowly, completely squeegeeing out all liquid. use only a small amount of spray (very light mist) on curved surfaces. apply the film in the correct place and work fluid out with the squeegee from center to edges. remember to start in the center and work to all edges, working clockwise or counterclockwise. Keep working the squeegee in the same directions, overlapping strokes. From the center out like rays on the sun of a kid’s drawing - NOT BACK then FORTH or UP then DOWN. just keep squeegeeing until the thing conforms to the surface shape. this takes a little patience & persistence. you will have to squeegee completely several times using some force to get out all of the liquid.

    stoneguard material is made of the same stuff as 3M controltac decal material that is used to do the body wraps for the advertising vehicles and beer trucks. The key is to read all instructions completely and follow them. THEN, if you can’t get that to work right, go ahead with the ‘wet’ application as detailed above. If they can wrap a VW bug with this stuff to make it look like a rhino running out of the jungle without any bubbles; surely, you can successfully install it on a rocker panel! After decorating your fiftieth beer truck you will begin to start to get it.
  11. PAFJ

    PAFJ

    Messages:
    1,596
    Location:
    Olypen
    Well...for those who are interested, I finally got around to installing previously mention 3m tape (post #8) on rockers. Installation was a snap...I am very happy with the results. The vinyl tape should provide some could protection from road debris, as well as seal up the holes left from the snake blinders. I was planning on taking pics; however, after installing you couldn't even tell the tape was on there, so...pics wouldn't really do any justice. Albeit, if someone would like pics...I would be happy to take some.

    :cheers:

Share This Page