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Need Charcoal Canister Help

Discussion in '40- & 55-Series Tech' started by brianyoung77, Jan 11, 2010.

  1. brianyoung77

    brianyoung77

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Broomfield, CO
    I have had my FJ40 for about 6 months and I am always figuring out what is missing or not the way it is supposed to be.

    Lately I have been smelling gas after it has been running for a while. I have narrowed it down to the fact that I don't have a charcoal canister. However, it is running fine.

    I have a Chevy V8, with a Webber 4bbl carb. I have the line going to the fuel pump and then to the carb. I have one fuel line that is is capped. The other is open by the wheel well. I assume that one is the one venting the gas tank, which I know I need.

    Since I don't have a charcoal canister are there any work arounds so that I can vent the gas somewhere? I have read that you can vent it into the carb.

    Does it matter which vaccum port I plug it into?

    Can I "T" into the vaccum line that goes to the brake booster? Or is there another vaccum line that I can tie into?

    If I get a charcoal canister, i don't know where to send the hose after I plug into the canister.

    Sorry for the dumb quesitons, but I am still learning. I would appreciate any help.
    Thanks
    Brian
  2. numby

    numby

    Messages:
    743
    Either could be your original return line to the tank or a vent line. One of them does need to remain uncapped.

    OEM did this through various vacuum and temperature operated switches and eventually into the intake manifold. Not easily doable with a non-original engine.

    In theory, yes. At what RPM range or operating temperature, etc. did Toyota do it? Manifold vacuum vs. ported vacuum. All these are moot with your current set-up IMHO.

    The brake booster runs off manifold vacuum (when the throttle is closed). See above. If you're going to suck fumes from the gas tank every time the car idles you'll need to make certain that you've got a vented gas cap in the least. You probably don't want fumes condensing in the booster anyway. Probably not the best for longevity.

    I'd get a Chevy canister and copy the layout of a mid 70's pick-up. There are some oddities there as well such as PCV valves with dual lines, etc. Look at a bunch from 1973 onward and copy what looks simplest.

    The other option is just run the vent line to a less...uh..noticable location. That way you'll be covered for both expansion and contraction of the tank. Not PC but then, you're driving a 40.

    No such thing. Good luck!
  3. cmiller114

    cmiller114

    Messages:
    298
    Location:
    Enola, PA.
    I have a very similar set-up. If you remove the filler cover (behind the passenger seat) you will find the separator. Check the lines running from the separator to the tank, if they are stiff and cracked, you will get gas fumes in the cab. I know, I did.
    Some guys just eliminate the entire system and drill a small hole in the gas cap.
    My vent line from the separator is also open in the wheel well. I have considered attaching it to a canister and then to the air cleaner for a slight vacuum, not to a vacuum port as that would be just a vacuum leak which SBC's don't like. The canister must also act as a spark arrestor so a back fire won't blow up the truck.

    Attached Files:

  4. brianyoung77

    brianyoung77

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Broomfield, CO
    Thanks for the input. I will go check out an older Chevy and see what kind of set up they have.

    My fuel separator behind the passenger seat is fine. So I know that is not the problem.

    I guess I was hoping that someone with a 350 could give me a pic of their setup.

    My last option if I can't get a chevy system to work is to just route the vent/breather hose to the rear of the vehicle.
  5. cruiserbrett

    cruiserbrett Moderator

    Messages:
    2,352
    Location:
    San Diego
    more that likely there is a suitable fitting on the carb to attach to the charcoal canister. I am sure you can find a manual for the carb and it should show it. might be labeled "evap" or something like that. burning the vapors from the gas tank is actually beneficial to gas mileage. when its warm out, gas tends to vaporize quite a bit, and your just releasing gas to the atmosphere if not introducing it to the carb. the side benefit is no more gas smell inside the truck.
  6. brianyoung77

    brianyoung77

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Broomfield, CO
    Great, so I will get a charcoal canister. Do you know how the lines go in and out of it?

    Does the vent line goes into the top? Then the other one out of the top goes to the carb.

    Does the fuel return line go into the canister? Is that what plugs into the bottom of the canister?
  7. numby

    numby

    Messages:
    743
    I agree with cmiller114's point about vacuum leaks and SBCs. Vacuum leaks at the brake booster connection (or a bad booster) are sometimes responsible for burned valves numbers 5 & 6 on LC engines IIRC.

    Remember - the tank needs to vent in both directions as temperature changes as well.

    That being said, the in-cab gas smell I had ended up being related to the main filler neck hose and the inefficient way the old OEM hose clamp secured it to the tank. Just too much play/wear/deformation/etc. The problem went away when I swapped in a new hose and clamp.
  8. brianyoung77

    brianyoung77

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Broomfield, CO
    Yeah, I know the smell is definitely comming from the engine compartment and not from inside the cab. I know it has to do with the lack of a charcoal filter. I think the PO just didn't know what to do with it, so he just tossed it and parked the cruiser outside so he didn't have the smell build up in the garage.

    I guess I just need a good Chevy 350 setup. Anyone out there fit a charcoal filter with a 350?
  9. doc5339

    doc5339

    Messages:
    81
    Charcoal canister for chevy 350 small block v8

    It seems that I have the exact same problem.

    One of the previous owners trashed the Charcoal Canister, and Fuel Separator.

    The gasoline smell is pretty strong inside the cab, even when the engine is not running.

    ANY specific guidance would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks in advance.
  10. doc5339

    doc5339

    Messages:
    81
    I am leaning towards installing used OEM Fuel Separator and Charcoal Canister with my existing Chevy 350.

    Do any of you guys see a problem with that, or should I use a GM Charcoal Canister? Does it matter?

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