Water in engine block

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May 4, 2022
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Hey guys. I recently got my van(non USA fj60) running after installing a new distributor. She ran terrible until i decided to give static timing a shot. This changed everything and she idled like a dream for about 5 minutes and then the engine seized. (yes, I made sure she had enough water and oil) so I decided to take the engine head off and I discovered water inside my engine block. How do I get rid of all of this water? It's everywhere and it's a lot. Thanks in advance for any answers.
 

g-man

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Mop any water out from the top of the pistons. Put some Automatic transmission fluid in the cylinders and let it soak into the piston rings/cylinder walls. After a few days, try to turn the motor by hand and see if you can get it to turn. If it will turn, change the oil ...get all the transmission fluid, coolant etc out and get your cylinder head to a head shop to test it for cracks. Microscopic cracks can happen between the water passages and and oil passages. Magfux is a magnetic test with iron powder that will show them. Once you get everything back together, make sure the timing is right and check compression. If you have good compression you can get it running. Otherwise it may be time for a rebuild.

Incorrect timing can overheat an engine.
 

Godwin

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When you are saying water in the engine block following engine seizing I'm assuming you mean you found water in the cylinders. Water in the cylinders would cause the engine to seize. You have, or had, a blown head gasket or cracked head. As stated above have the head checked for cracks.
 
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I had water in my engine block around my cylinders. I used a syringe and a piece of fuel pipe to suck out as much as I could. Today I decided to remove my oil sump to see what was going on in there. I found some thin shards of metal in the sump as well as some shards of metal lodged in between one of the bearings and counterweights of my crankshaft so I'm wondering if that could be the reason for my engine seizing. And also my head gasket was completely shot, so I'm not surprised that there was so much water in there.
 

OSS

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The last rebuild I did with a guy, we pulled out the engine with a rented engine hoist on a Saturday and lowered it into a pickup truck on top of an old tire. Then drove it over to the machine shop. At the shop they had a loading dock with runner tracks above and hoisted it out of the pickup and rolled it on the ceiling tracks into the shop.

The next weekend (or 2) we picked it up all rebuilt and installed it back at home.

It’s not as daunting as it seems. Just need an engine hoist and a pickup truck to transport the engine.
 

g-man

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It's a bit involved. Drian the oil and coolant. Unbolt the motor mounts and removing the bellhousing bolts. Disconnect heater hoses that go to the firewall and radiator hoses and any ground wires. Remove the a/c belt and pull the fan shroud off so you don't get hung up on it. You'll need to disconnect the accelerator linkage from the carb too. Then you have to remove the exhaust pipe at the exhaust manifold. Also remove the dizzy, plugs, plug wires, side cover, oil mount/pressure sender and fuel mount. Using a magnet pull the lifters out. Since you already have the head off I assume you pulled the push rods out. If not pull them out and keep them in order. Using a magnet pull the lifters out (you will see them when you get the side cover off). By the way the 1980 2f engine factory service manual would be good to follow here. You can find it by clicking the "resources" button at the top of the page and drilling down to it. Then download it for free.

Pulling out the engine means you have to rent or buy an engine hoist. You run a strong chain diagonally from engine hook to hook or if they are missing run them under two head bolts that you loosen then tighten back down on the chain links. Using the engine hoist crank the motor up. The hoist will have wheels so you can then move it away from the vehicle. Then lower the motor and bolt it to a motor stand that bolts to the back of the motor. Motor stands have a swivel so you can turn the motor upside down while on the stand. Then you remove the all the bits off the engine like fan, water pump, alternator, power steering pump, intake and exhaust manifold, flywheel, front timing cover and whatever else is in the way. Then flip the motor upside down, unbolt the oil pan and disconnect the connecting rods from the crankshaft. Once they are loose slide short pieces of fuel line over the stud on the connecting rod so it doesn't scratch the cylinder wall, and using a mallet and a long wood or rubber dowl as a punch you can knock the pistons out the top of the motor. I believe the cam shaft comes out the front by pulling the cam gear. I think it comes out in one piece, I mean the gear and the cam together ...again consult the 2f engine fsm.

the part that you can't do is you need to take the block and the crankshaft to a machinist who will measure the cylinder walls and the crankshaft to see if they are within specs. If they are not he will bore the pistons to a slightly larger diameter and turn the crankshaft to a smaller diameter where the bearing touch it. Then you have to order the correct size crank bearings and new pistons and rings. You'll need to learn how to install the rings on the pistons and you'll also need new camshaft bushings too. Or maybe you just buy new cam kit which includes bearings, cam and lifters that all match. You will want to replace the oil pump too. And you need to order a new engine master gasket kit or rebuild kit. One that will have all the gaskets and seals that you will need to replace. While your block is at the shop you will want to get the cylinder head to a head shop to check it for cracks and have them replace the valve stem seals and maybe resurface the valve seats. Also they can put new valves in if yours are worn. They will re-surface the mating surface to make sure it's flat within specs. I'm sure I'm forgetting some details but it is involved. Otherwise just remove it and take it to a pro.
 
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Do you guys think I should rather do an engine swap? I really love the 2F and I have spent months learning every little thing I can about these engines but everywhere I turn, I have people telling me to switch to a V8. I usually ignored it because I really trust the old motors. Am I being stupid?
 
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Do you guys think I should rather do an engine swap? I really love the 2F and I have spent months learning every little thing I can about these engines but everywhere I turn, I have people telling me to switch to a V8. I usually ignored it because I really trust the old motors. Am I being stupid?
I'd look around for a good used 2F
 

g-man

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I also think you have to disconnect the clutch and/or at least the clutch fork. If you remove the dust cover from the bottom of the bellhousing you can reach up there. Check with the FSM.
 

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