Seek advise on German based HZJ75 (1 Viewer)

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Hello,
Been thinking for a while to travel from LA down to Argentina, originally planned on traveling with my wife by GS adv Bmw, this was a trip that we have been planning to do for some time now. But just had back surgery and we are re thinking our mode of travel..
I have always been fascinated by the “slightly more comfort” of driving a diesel truck and so now we are pulling the trigger on preparing for such a trip.
I am looking currently at a ‘95 HZJ75 registered in Germany with 190,000km, looks clean and seems to be fully kitted, roof clam tent, kitchen, tanks ...
I am based in Los Angeles, and was inquiring if anyone had any advise for bringIng a troopy to California. I’m aware of the 25year rule, and also the California Smog diesel exemption, again it looks good on paper, but thought I should ask.
I am completely new to this forum and so I appreciate any info or thoughts anyone may have.
Thank you,
david L.
 

jblueridge

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The 25 year rule is calculated down to the month of production.
People say California registration is difficult, but I do not read too carefully cuz I am here in VA.

My 1988 BJ74 is less than comfortable, at least as comfort is understood in the 21st century.
Does the one you are looking at have suspension seats?
 

gilmorneau

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Getting the car from Germany to the USA is not difficult—I’ve done several and am in the process of bringing in another one right now. If it’s a ‘95, check the manufacture date to make sure it’s gonna be over 25 when it hits the port. Month/ year.

You might want to read the thread re: registration in CA over in the importing forum. Some guys have succeeded, many have failed. It would be a good idea to see about an out of state address if you need a backup plan.

Troopies are more comfortable riding than the short wheelbase models, especially with a good aftermarket suspension, but they’re never gonna be an Escalade.
 
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The 25 year rule is calculated down to the month of production.
People say California registration is difficult, but I do not read too carefully cuz I am here in VA.

My 1988 BJ74 is less than comfortable, at least as comfort is understood in the 21st century.
Does the one you are looking at have suspension seats?
 
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Cheers thank you for your reply.
I will check on the month of production and delivery, makes complete sense.
California ain’t easy for sure, so I will have to seek other options if registering the vehicle becomes impossible...
Yes, def. not seeking 21st comfort, but I feel that this would be the next step up from riding a 600lbs motorcycle + 400lbs On top through hard wind, cold and high heat temperatures
I know my wife‘s neck problems (heavy helmet), my shoulder, and lower back will appreciate the change.
I looked up what seats it currently had, and it mentions the recaro seats brand, don’t know if they are the suspension type or not, but easy to find out..
Thank you for the notes, very exciting stuff..
 
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Getting the car from Germany to the USA is not difficult—I’ve done several and am in the process of bringing in another one right now. If it’s a ‘95, check the manufacture date to make sure it’s gonna be over 25 when it hits the port. Month/ year.

You might want to read the thread re: registration in CA over in the importing forum. Some guys have succeeded, many have failed. It would be a good idea to see about an out of state address if you need a backup plan.

Troopies are more comfortable riding than the short wheelbase models, especially with a good aftermarket suspension, but they’re never gonna be an Escalade.
 
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Cheers again,
Good to know, bringing a 95 from Europe should hopefully be not too difficult.
Will check out the forum you mentioned of.
Is registering out of state a simple process for a euro market Toyota?
Def. don’t want an Escalade type of feel, but good to know the longer wheel base is helpful,
Along with possible mods to the suspension.
Not looking for comfort but more utilitarian, feeling alive type of journey..
Thank you,
DL.
 

gilmorneau

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I looked up what seats it currently had, and it mentions the recaro seats brand, don’t know if they are the suspension type or not, but easy to find out..

The suspension seats were an OEM option on some short and mid wheelbase 70 series Landcruisers. I've never seen them as original equipment in a Troopy, but that's not to say it isn't possible that some were so equipped. While it's probably possible to put Recaros on OEM Toyota suspension seat bases, it's not likely that's what you have.

Will check out the forum you mentioned of.

I see you found it. Lots of good intel.

Is registering out of state a simple process for a euro market Toyota?

Depends on the State--they're all different. In Colorado, the State publishes a list of what you'll need if you're the importer. That list is here:
None of it is complicated, and if your import is legal, it's all stuff you'll have anyway.

If a "gray market" car has been previously registered in another State, all you'll need is that other State's title to get it registered in most States.

feeling alive type of journey..

Traveling by car (no matter what kind) is never going to be as immersive and tactile of an experience as traveling by motorcycle. I've done a lot of both over the years, and there's always an isolation from the people and environment that comes with traveling by car. Of course, on the other hand, it's nice to have shelter from the weather, a few luxuries, and a nice dry place to sleep.
 
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The suspension seats were an OEM option on some short and mid wheelbase 70 series Landcruisers. I've never seen them as original equipment in a Troopy, but that's not to say it isn't possible that some were so equipped. While it's probably possible to put Recaros on OEM Toyota suspension seat bases, it's not likely that's what you have.



I see you found it. Lots of good intel.



Depends on the State--they're all different. In Colorado, the State publishes a list of what you'll need if you're the importer. That list is here:
None of it is complicated, and if your import is legal, it's all stuff you'll have anyway.

If a "gray market" car has been previously registered in another State, all you'll need is that other State's title to get it registered in most States.



Traveling by car (no matter what kind) is never going to be as immersive and tactile of an experience as traveling by motorcycle. I've done a lot of both over the years, and there's always an isolation from the people and environment that comes with traveling by car. Of course, on the other hand, it's nice to have shelter from the weather, a few luxuries, and a nice dry place to sleep.
Cheers and thank you very much for the good info.
i d
The suspension seats were an OEM option on some short and mid wheelbase 70 series Landcruisers. I've never seen them as original equipment in a Troopy, but that's not to say it isn't possible that some were so equipped. While it's probably possible to put Recaros on OEM Toyota suspension seat bases, it's not likely that's what you have.



I see you found it. Lots of good intel.



Depends on the State--they're all different. In Colorado, the State publishes a list of what you'll need if you're the importer. That list is here:
None of it is complicated, and if your import is legal, it's all stuff you'll have anyway.

If a "gray market" car has been previously registered in another State, all you'll need is that other State's title to get it registered in most States.



Traveling by car (no matter what kind) is never going to be as immersive and tactile of an experience as traveling by motorcycle. I've done a lot of both over the years, and there's always an isolation from the people and environment that comes with traveling by car. Of course, on the other hand, it's nice to have shelter from the weather, a few luxuries, and a nice dry place to sleep.
Thank you Gilmorneau,
I had gone through similar research 9-10 years ago about the defender import thought of it all. Even met a guy in North Carolina that sold
A bunch of them, except they did not look 25 years old but 10, was very fishy.. 6 months later after I pulled out the guy was raided by who knows what agency and all his trucks were sent to be crushed..
So, would love to bring the trooper into the US legally, and also make it even more challenging, to have it registered in California.
“Some have succeeded, many have failed”
There was one on BAT back in March that left for 40k+, the ones from South America can be quite dodgy..
Germany seems to be the best option.
The part I need to figure is what route to Take legalize the vehicle here in LA, what port of entry and etc....
Cheers to you. Best.
 

gilmorneau

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Roll on Roll off

As opposed to shipping in a container, which is the other option.

Contrary to TonyP's experience, I've shipped all my cars from Europe to the USA RORO and had no problems whatsoever. Maybe just lucky.
 

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