Maintenance...Water Pump, T-Stat, Oil Cooler, Flush Engine/Radiator, now head-gasket blown :(

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Pump is out of vehicle, prepped for surgery and under general anesthesia.

Going to tear it down later this evening and see what the insides look like.

Probably wait until tomorrow to clean and reassemble.


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Maybe I should do this also what was the procedure did you drain fluid somehow? My hose is leaking that goes to reservoir and I was just gonna replace that. I already have half the dam motor apart why stop now.
 

flintknapper

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@flintknapper, just curious what your thoughts are at this point in the job of removing the engine (or engine and transmission) to do the work you're doing. I've read several posts on this topic, and most who have done it both ways seem to favor pulling the engine when doing the HG. On the other hand, if you're working alone and don't have easy access to a buddy to help pull the motor, I think that sounds like a difficult and potentially dangerous job. Certainly all the 'while you're in there' stuff seems much easier when the 'in there' is in the garage rather than laying on a board on the engine bay in the driveway. Just curious what you think at this point.
Thanks for the detailed work and photos in this thread, it's very helpful to many people, myself included.

No question about it, pulling the engine would be the way to go. I sort of Switched Horses in Midstream and went from just doing a quick head gasket change to something a bit more time consuming. By the time I changed my mind it was too late to move the vehicle inside into my shop (which is full of other projects). It would just be SO........much easier to reach everything and work on it.

I have engine stands, hoists, blasting cabinet, parts washer, and automotive tools accumulated over 50 yrs. of wrenching on my vehicles, so it would have been an easier task....had I just pulled something else out of the way and drove the Cruiser in there.

Anyway.....about ready now to button her back up. Not a big deal really, I'm retired...so aside from other things that need to be done around the ranch, I can work on it at my leisure.
 
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No question about it, pulling the engine would be the way to go. I sort of Switched Horses in Midstream and went from just doing a quick head gasket change to something a bit more time consuming. By the time I changed my mind it was too late to move the vehicle inside into my shop (which is full of other projects). It would just be SO........much easier to reach everything and work on it.

I have engine stands, hoists, blasting cabinet, parts washer, and automotive tools accumulated over 50 yrs. of wrenching on my vehicles, so it would have been an easier task....had I just pulled something else out of the way and drove the Cruiser in there.

Anyway.....about ready now to button her back up. Not a big deal really, I'm retired...so aside from other things that need to be done around the ranch, I can work on it at my leisure.
Thanks for your thoughts on that. Yours seems to be the consensus opinion - just pull the engine when doing the HG. I appreciate it.
 

flintknapper

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Maybe I should do this also what was the procedure did you drain fluid somehow? My hose is leaking that goes to reservoir and I was just gonna replace that. I already have half the dam motor apart why stop now.
My hose (the large one) was also leaking. Upon examination...all of the hoses have become hard and I can twist them on their fittings. So I am going to replace all of the hoses except the high pressure line which still looks and feels good.

I've got the pump almost all apart (just lack the front side plate and seal). I'll take pics along the way in case anyone needs them.

The fluid from my reservoir drained out when I broke the Banjo Bolt loose to remove the pump, so you'll want a 'catch pan' underneath it. Then also a small amount poured out from the pump itself upon removal.
 
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My hose (the large one) was also leaking. Upon examination...all of the hoses have become hard and I can twist them on their fittings. So I am going to replace all of the hoses except the high pressure line which still looks and feels good.

I've got the pump almost all apart (just lack the front side plate and seal). I'll take pics along the way in case anyone needs them.

The fluid from my reservoir drained out when I broke the Banjo Bolt loose to remove the pump, so you'll want a 'catch pan' underneath it. Then also a small amount poured out from the pump itself upon removal.
 
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Awesome I think I will hold of a bit seeing it’s a easy rebuild. I just broke my radiator steam breather port trying to brake free the crank pulley bolt!!! I knew I should have pulled the radiator. :bang:
 

flintknapper

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Awesome I think I will hold of a bit seeing it’s a easy rebuild. I just broke my radiator steam breather port trying to brake free the crank pulley bolt!!! I knew I should have pulled the radiator. :bang:
I'll post some pics tomorrow...that might help.

Radiator carnage....you are in good company Sir. Can't tell you the number of folks that have done that.
 
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Pump is out of vehicle, prepped for surgery and under general anesthesia.

Going to tear it down later this evening and see what the insides look like.

Probably wait until tomorrow to clean and reassemble.


View attachment 2348342
View attachment 2348343
View attachment 2348346 :wrench:
Hey flint, I have a quick question. Can you recall which orientation the vanes fit in. I recall that their is a rounded side and a squared off side to them. I have a pump dismantled and I can't recall the orientation.
 

flintknapper

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Hey flint, I have a quick question. Can you recall which orientation the vanes fit in. I recall that their is a rounded side and a squared off side to them. I have a pump dismantled and I can't recall the orientation.
Yes Sir, the square side goes toward the center of the hub the rounded part towards the outside.

Pump Pic8a.jpg


Borrowed someone else's photo and labeled it for my convenience when doing my pump:

ps pump assy.jpg
 
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flintknapper

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All done with mine except to replace the Valve Spring. Will do that when it arrives and reinstall the unit on my Cruiser.

All the O-Rings on mine were hard and brittle. Had only small amounts of 'varnish' in certain areas....but IF you live in a hot climate and have very many miles on your pump...you might expect to see some of that when you tear down your pump.

I have quite a few pics if anyone needs them, but there is already a good step by step thread on the subject....so no need to repeat it here.




Pump Pic18.jpg
 
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flintknapper

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Thanks, if have one torn apart that I haven't rebuilt yet and just wanted confirmation from a trusted source. :cheers:
Happy to help an Old Friend. And if you need pics....just let me know.

One thing I'll post here that I found quite handy was the use of a strong magnetic pick up tool. Instead of doing all that 'bouncing on table' thing the FSM recommends (to dislodge the plates and other parts).

I just pulled them straight out with the magnet (except the front plate). I'm sure it varies one pump to another as to just how 'in there' the parts are...but its only O-Ring friction holding them.

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flintknapper

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Wanted to clean out my Power Steering Reservoir today in preparation for new hoses. My reservoir still has good flow so I didn't need to take it apart. Got the outside cleaned up and it just didn't look too great. The Cadmium Plating is still all there...but the coating (Sodium Dichromate) is faded and worn in spots. Of course...I don't have any S/D (or sulfuric acid) laying around to re-dip it in, so it's now Satin Black.

Got new hoses installed on it. While inspecting all the hoses in the Power Steering system I noticed the high pressure hoses are just fine, still pliable and look to be in good shape. The low pressure hoses are hard as a rock and I can freely twist/turn them on their connections. They were definitely leaking. So all of those will be replaced. I'll be replacing those lines with 6AN braided hose for its abrasion resistance...and because I already have some laying around.

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flintknapper

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Older Brother says he can come up this weekend and give me a hand setting the head back on the engine. I have an engine hoist and leveler....but it's still nice to have a second pair of hands.

I cut the heads off a couple of old head bolts, beveled the shank and cut a screwdriver slot in them. Going to use them as 'guide studs' to help position the head when lowering onto the engine block.

Things tend to go right when Big Brother is involved....so I'm glad he is coming.

Guide Studs1.jpg
 

flintknapper

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Well....the weather doesn't look like it is going to cooperate much this weekend, so Big Brother coming up has been postponed.

Might have a small window of opportunity tomorrow morning. Perhaps just time enough to set the head in place and get it torqued down. I can put the cams in later. Actually....I'm thinking about letting the head sit overnight and check the torque values of the head bolts the next day (or when conditions allow). I'm struggling with the idea that the procedure in the FSM (torque to 29 ft. lbs. then two series of 90° turns) is the best method.

There has to be a torque value at which the bolts stretch to 'yield' and the engineers certainly know that. I'd be much surprised if that was the method used originally when the engine was put together. It sounds suspiciously like something designed to let someone under less controlled conditions...torque the head down 'close enough'.

I'll be using a Torque Angle Gauge so I could set my digital Torque Wrench on 'peak' and record the highest reading reached at the completion of the second 90° turn. That would give me the true dynamic torque, though going back later and seeing what the static torque (break away force) is could be useful too IF they prove to be fairly consistent.

My WAG is that the head bolts are probably between 80-90 ft. lbs (dynamic).
 
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