Have done, would do over?

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Hello all. I'm in the process of buying the following:

Lift Kit
Wheels and Tires
Roof Rack/Tent
Rock Sliders
Front Bumper w/winch
Rear Bumper

Given that most of you have explored theses items extensively, which products would you go for if money wasn't a problem at all? Specifically, what lift and wheel tire combo would you go for when creating a comfortable commuter but also a capable off roader? What's the best size and offset for say a 3-4 inch lift? Is there a roof rack/tent option that is just amazing and shouldn't be passed up? What about bumpers and rock sliders, or side steps? I'm slowly putting this vehicle together, and want to do it right. Any advice is greatly appreciated.
 
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All the information is in the search.

Theres really no right answer. When it comes to choices, it all comes down to preferences and prior experience. And everyone will be different. Are you someone where this is your first 4x4 or someone who wants to get into overlanding? You never stated your typical uses.

You'll also find there's no 3 inch lift kit for a 100 series, because you can't "lift" a 100. Lift kits don't exist on the 100.

If money were no issue, I'd just send it all off to Dissent and Slee and not have to touch a single wrench.
 

JunkCrzr89

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You'll also find there's no 3 inch lift kit for a 100 series, because you can't "lift" a 100. Lift kits don't exist on the 100.

If money were no issue, I'd just send it all off to Dissent and Slee and not have to touch a single wrench.
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if money wasn't a problem at all? Specifically, what lift and wheel tire combo would you go for
Cut out torsion bar IFS, swap in a 3-linked D60, slam fo’deeeez
 
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Sounds like an overland (or as I fondly call them "overista") rig.

Me: I would not have done sliders...too heavy. Keep the original steps as sacrificial early warning system.

Wiight is your enemy...see . Ronny Dahl's weight epiphiny.
 
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Comet

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Less is more. That is currently my approach. I am seeing some heavy rigs struggle to do things my stock vehicle does with ease. I realize this is not the advice you are seeking; however, I would solicit anyone (you included) to resist the overlanding craze of bolting everything you can possible to the rig before driving it. For me, the destination of a well sorted rig is in the journey to find your perceived deficiencies. This gives me the opportunity to evaluate the pro’s and con’s of a modification and act according to my individual needs. At the moment I am looking for knowledge of field repairs, water storage, minimalistic tool kit, and spare parts necessary to get me home in one piece. Not trying to start a pissing match, just stating my intentions for my rigs.
 
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Less is more. Having knowledge of field repairs, water storage, minimalistic tool kit, and spare parts necessary to get you home in one piece.

This is spot on for overlanding. Everything else is just bling.

What's your definition of "capable off roader"? A decent set of all terrain tires and a place to store all your gear is all you really need. Bumpers only help if you plan on hitting things or need a lighter wallet. The factory rims are pretty stout as they are so look for 33" tires to fit OEM rims.

I'm a big fan of the Rhino Rack Pioneer platform. It may not look as cool as the Prinsu style racks but it's super versatile and it can be removed in 5 minutes if needed. It has more room as it can over hang the mounting points of the truck. I also like be able to stand on the roof so the extra surface area of the Pioneer slats are a great bonus.

If you're looking for a capable car camping rig that serves as a comfortable daily driver, your main goal should be reliability. The truck is capable enough to take care of the rest.
 
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My 100 is a heavy beast, but I'm OK with that. I built mine for "Overlanding Plus", meaning it can also go on some tougher trails from time to time. I have every single item on your list (done over time) and I don't regret any of them; next big ticket item (to help with everything listed) is a 40-gallon LRA tank to give me a little peace of mind on the more remote trails and to eliminate the need for jerry cans (which I hate).
 
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Do ALL of the maintenance you can afford at a cruiser shop.

Get some good tires.

Dissent skids to protect fluid pans (they are incredibly well designed).

Good recovery gear.

Depending on how far off the beaten path you plan to go, a winch. From July - September in Colorado there really isn't a trail anymore where I am alone for more than an hour these days. So instead of putting a winch on, I could just pack an extra few sandwiches.

I have on multiple occasions considered returning my 100 to almost stock.
 
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If you'll be offroading in Florida and the southeast, get some good a/t tires and call it done (for the actual off road gear). Get a winch if you're going in the muck. Or a tow rope and always go with a buddy vehicle.

Camping here is too hot for a tent. I've done it my whole life. The game changer was building a small travel trailer with a/c. It's nice being able to comfortably camp in the summer. A roof top tent is neat, but if you're camping in the south, be ready to sweat or limit your camping months.

I'm a bit jealous of the guys with the hood-mounted solar panels, and the 12v fridge in the back. That seems like an awesome setup to have.
 
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If you'll be offroading in Florida and the southeast, get some good a/t tires and call it done (for the actual off road gear). Get a winch if you're going in the muck. Or a tow rope and always go with a buddy vehicle.

Camping here is too hot for a tent. I've done it my whole life. The game changer was building a small travel trailer with a/c. It's nice being able to comfortably camp in the summer. A roof top tent is neat, but if you're camping in the south, be ready to sweat or limit your camping months.

I'm a bit jealous of the guys with the hood-mounted solar panels, and the 12v fridge in the back. That seems like an awesome setup to have.

Travel trailer is a good idea. I'm not a hammocking guy (prefer ground tenting due to where I typically backpack) but a hammock with bug screen is a very comfortable alternative in warm weather. The boutique hammock camping industry has come a long ways in the last decade - can pretty much sleep in one all year round it seems (and some do?).
 
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I think money on a roof rack is wasted if you are just going to mount a RTT up there, RTT mounting solutions can be done far cheaper. Now if you want to run a soft RTT, use the roof to carry items in front of it and mount an awning, then a roof rack is needed.

Tire I would go with is 275 - 70 R18

Figure out your weight before doing suspension. Do you really need a rear bumper? or is it want?

I did Hundred in the Hills in Ouray, Moab twice, Lived in Denver and wheeled all over with New Toyota shocks, OME 856 springs and home brew sliders. These rigs dont need much to do alot of trails.

Maintenance > Tires > Sliders > Suspension / Bumpers.

I like to say that you should use it. You will find you dont reall need all that stuff. I have used my roof rack more for hauling furniture for the wife than needing it for camping / wheeling trips.
 
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Roof tents are the most overrated and under-utilized equipment on the market. They have fallen to "Status Symbol" level - when you see one of the road, that person has presented a facade that says they are outdoorsy and go on fun adventures. There is nothing in this world that can convince me that there is anything more practical about a rooftop tent than, oh I don't know, a normal tent! You lose your roof space, you add weight up high, you can't easily take it down, and you can't/shouldn't make a dog go up into one!
 
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Travel trailer is a good idea. I'm not a hammocking guy (prefer ground tenting due to where I typically backpack) but a hammock with bug screen is a very comfortable alternative in warm weather. The boutique hammock camping industry has come a long ways in the last decade - can pretty much sleep in one all year round it seems (and some do?).
I do a lot of primitive camping for canoe trips. Usually I use a small tent that's 95% screen, but still need to use the rain fly, which blocks breezes. On my next trip I'll try pitching my hammock rain fly over the tent to keep the breeze in and the rain out.
This was my most recent trip, it worked great (first time hammock camping). The bug screen can still keep in a bit of heat, but it helps to jump in the water immediately before going to bed to cool down.

edit: apologies for derailing the thread

IMG_20210306_173322.jpg
 
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They have fallen to "Status Symbol" level - when you see one of the road, that person has presented a facade that says they are outdoorsy and go on fun adventures.


Just like when Dicks Sporting Goods started selling The North Face Denali jackets... in womens... size 3XL.... There's an adventure all right, just not the one they are advertising.....
 
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Thanks everyone for the input, I truly appreciate it. I have certainly tailored my desires a bit based on what everyone is saying. The vehicle is in good mechanical condition, but the suspension feels soggy to me, so I will replace that, maybe with OME, then equip some larger tires on the stock rims, change front bumper only to accommodate a winch and additional light mounting, put on a new roof rack, scrap the tent idea and allocate some of the additional monies into a smart pull behind that can sustain us for a couple of days. Camping on Ft Desoto, Bahia Honda, Playalinda and things like that are our goal. I envy you guys who have the Rockies to play in!
 
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Thanks everyone for the input, I truly appreciate it. I have certainly tailored my desires a bit based on what everyone is saying. The vehicle is in good mechanical condition, but the suspension feels soggy to me, so I will replace that, maybe with OME, then equip some larger tires on the stock rims, change front bumper only to accommodate a winch and additional light mounting, put on a new roof rack, scrap the tent idea and allocate some of the additional monies into a smart pull behind that can sustain us for a couple of days. Camping on Ft Desoto, Bahia Honda, Playalinda and things like that are our goal. I envy you guys who have the Rockies to play in!
Not a lot of love in the 100 community for the OME shocks. You might do their springs and new Toyota shocks (most economical). I've left the Toyota torsion bars, OME springs in the rear, and I love my adjustable Tough Dog shocks. Other have gone with foam cell Ironmans, and you can get really spendy from there.
 

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