Dial gauge / indicator kits to use for Toyota diesel injector pumps, brake rotor runout, etc.

Joined
Oct 8, 2011
Messages
586
Location
Toronto, NSW, Australia
Can anyone suggest a really good dial gauge / indicator kit that can be used both with Toyota diesel injector pumps and also for general stuff such as measuring brake rotor runout? There are cheap no-name kits, really good stuff from Mitutoyo, and probably more.

I have the special tool to do 1hz/1hdt injector pump timing and believe the dial gauge needed to fit it requires an 8 mm bore. To test brake rotor runout the dial gauge needs to be attached either to a floor mounted stand or clamped via a bracket setup to the vehicle.

Thanks for whatever you can suggest and I'll go have a look.

Craig.
 
Joined
Dec 17, 2007
Messages
3,385
Location
Sydney, Australia
You can pick up cheap magnetic bases for not much coin $40-50, and a decent dial gauge for not much more, kinchrome or similar
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Or pick up both on eBay as a kit for less than $50
 
Joined
Feb 21, 2012
Messages
1,495
Location
Snohomish, WA
Why buy cheap tools to take measurements on expensive, important parts? I try to steer clear of anything made overseas unless it's European or Japanese in origin. Long ago I bought a used Snap-On GA3400 set on Ebay for less than $100. You can't beat the quality and it's USA made.
 
Joined
Mar 6, 2014
Messages
25
Location
Sonoita AZ.
I'll second mud gudgeon on the cheaper stuff I have a starrett last word and 3 40>60$ from little machine shop&grizzly,etc
and there within .002 of one another, I don't even look at which one I grab anymore to line stuff up on the mill

way more then you will ever need for brake work
 
Joined
Dec 17, 2007
Messages
3,385
Location
Sydney, Australia
Why buy cheap tools to take measurements on expensive, important parts? I try to steer clear of anything made overseas unless it's European or Japanese in origin. Long ago I bought a used Snap-On GA3400 set on Ebay for less than $100. You can't beat the quality and it's USA made.
Sometimes cheap isn't good value for money.
Sometimes paying a premium doesn't get you significantly better quality.

I value quality tools highly, but learnt that buying expensive tools can't always be justified. Particularly when it's something that might only get used a handful of times.

I have a mix of high quality tools, and middle of the road stuff. I avoid the chinsy cheap stuff, it costs you in damaged parts, or broken tools, but you can get middle of the road quality cheap too.

For a shade tree mechanic, weigh up whats fit for purpose, and value for money.
 
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