Broken rear lug studs

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So I went to swap on smaller tires for my motor swap and broke two of the rear studs taking them off🤬. What studs are you guys replacing with just factory or a ARP upgrade? I am assuming the tire shop when they installed my new 35’s over torqued with a air impact and stressed the stud. Thanks
 
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And any recommendations for black lug nuts mine are pretty beat up.
 

Bambusiero

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just guessing, of course - but - it's not a problem of what kind - but what they've been through - like being severely over-torqued by air-impact wrenches at a shop.
The OEM standard issue studs are perfectly capable of giving a long service life - if treated well.
 
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I went with OEM when the same happened to me, only it was about 50% of them on all 4 corners. When I had to get new tires, I asked them to use hand tools only and watched the do the whole thing. Even when providing the torque numbers to them they fought me giving me the torque values for the earlier style lug nuts that they had in their system. When I got home I loosened each and re-torqued to make sure. I just wish people would care when working on other people's vehicles.
 

Dave 2000

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I’d replace all the lug studs with OEM. If two broke the rest probably are not far behind.

Absolutely true, I had a couple fail on mine, replaced the set, it's not hard to do, and you could always adjust the hand brake while in there.

Regards

Dave
 

davidp14

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I replaced all of my front studs with oem when I rebuilt my knuckles. I got them from wits end and they're real easy to do with a big brass punch and 2lb hammer. Then use 2 nuts to draw the new ones in. Probably not the ideal way to do it but I don't have a press. Yet.
 
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I didn't have a press either and when I asked my mechanic if he had one and what it would cost to press them in, he advised against using a press unless you designed a good support/brace since the forces of the press could easily break the hub. He suggested a hammer and brass drift which is what I did using wooden blocks to support the hub as well as I could. It went smoothly and didn't feel like it took too much force with the direct impact on the stud and vibration from the blow driving them in. I didn't try the 2 nut method. Just so everyone reading this knows, the FSM procedure is to use a press with an extension bar.
 

NLXTACY

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I didn't have a press either and when I asked my mechanic if he had one and what it would cost to press them in, he advised against using a press unless you designed a good support/brace since the forces of the press could easily break the hub. He suggested a hammer and brass drift which is what I did using wooden blocks to support the hub as well as I could. It went smoothly and didn't feel like it took too much force with the direct impact on the stud and vibration from the blow driving them in. I didn't try the 2 nut method. Just so everyone reading this knows, the FSM procedure is to use a press with an extension bar.

Exactly why I developed this:

 
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Yeah, I almost bought it but needed to get things buttoned up before it would have arrived. I still think about needing to order that tool each time I change the tires. It would be invaluable to have around for when a lug breaks changing a flat on the road (as you already know :)).
 

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