Towing

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Joined
Dec 18, 2017
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5
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38
Location
Pennsylvania
I recently bought a Kubota B7100 HST with a FEL to do some work at my hunting lease. I’m looking for a trailer to haul it and need some input. The tractor is about 1800# with the FEL. I can get a 14’ single axle, no brakes, and still Ben under the 2,990 GVW. Or I could get a car hauler with 7,000# gvw, dual axles and brakes. I understand the benefits of dual axles and brakes, but.....the total trailering weight of the single axle will be approx 2,700# where the dual axle will be 3,300#. The distance will be 7-12 miles with the tractor, so, no long distances and prob about 6x a year. I am leaning towards towing less total weight and saving a grand. Thoughts and or experiences. Oh, and I do have a 5,0000#/500# tongue weight hitch. Thanks.
 
I think there are a lot of factors in buying a trailer beyond weight and distance only you can answer. Myself I would take a broader view of the use. A single purpose trailer seems unlikely as you will find other uses beyond the FEL and you don't always want to be at the limits. Can the dimensions accommodate repositioning the load to properly balance front to back? A single axle trailer is much more prone to sway. Do you have to room to store either or eventually purchase a second trailer? There are many states that require brakes on trailers that exceed 1500 lbs.

Best advice is to rent various sized/configured trailers until you determine what you like long term.
 
JMHO you will be much happier with a trailer with brakes. A tandem trailer is much easier to load And tows better.
 
I think there are a lot of factors in buying a trailer beyond weight and distance only you can answer. Myself I would take a broader view of the use. A single purpose trailer seems unlikely as you will find other uses beyond the FEL and you don't always want to be at the limits. Can the dimensions accommodate repositioning the load to properly balance front to back? A single axle trailer is much more prone to sway. Do you have to room to store either or eventually purchase a second trailer? There are many states that require brakes on trailers that exceed 1500 lbs.

Best advice is to rent various sized/configured trailers until you determine what you like long term.

In PA, my understanding is that 2,990 is the weight limit before you would need brakes and an annual inspection sticker. The single axle trailers have 3,500# axles but are tagged at 2,990# for that reason. I'm looking at 14'-16' trailers and the Kubota is 10' with the FEL. I think I'd have the room to balance the load. And, with the 7,000# dual axle trailer, I'd still be limited to 5,000# due to the limitation of the LC, so only an additional 1,300#. The Kubota is likely the heaviest load I'd haul and the other uses for the trailer would be building materials and my other, much lighter Cub Cadet tractor & tiller ~1,100#. My buddy has a 10' single axle that he hauls his JD Gator (~1,600#) with no issues and I'm going to haul the Kubota with that until I get my trailer, so I'll see how it works.

In addition to the trailer talk, I'm also looking for those who have trailered similar loads with their LC. It's not a power house going, nor stopping, which again is why I'm trying to decide if it's better to be close to the capacity of the trailer or the capacity of the tow vehicle. Thanks!!
 
I towed a single axle 4x8 trailer with no brakes for years tough it was fine tell one day on the way to the dump with less then 2,000# in it I had to make a panic stop with it. The trailer pushed the tow reg sideways jackknifing the hole thing. Thankfully no one was hurt, Dump was less then ten miles form my House Sh*t happens. Trailer Brakes help keep everthing in line when braking. Whatever trailer you choose get one with Brakes. Just not worth the risk JMHO
 
Why not drive the tractor the 6-12 miles each way? That's 30 minutes of travel each way, tops. What's that worth?
 
Why not drive the tractor the 6-12 miles each way? That's 30 minutes of travel each way, tops. What's that worth?

Top speed is ~9 mph (ie: engine & drivetrain working at their limit) - That's 45-60 minutes at 6 miles and 1:15 - 1:30 at 12 miles. Not the way I want to put hours on the tractor.

Brosky - thanks for the feedback.
 
Top speed is ~9 mph (ie: engine & drivetrain working at their limit) - That's 45-60 minutes at 6 miles and 1:15 - 1:30 at 12 miles. Not the way I want to put hours on the tractor.

Brosky - thanks for the feedback.

OK....The tractors I'm used to run at 22 MPH....NM.
 
Stock 80? Brakes in good condition? Short haul, shouldn't be a problem. You will wear the lighter trailer out faster, but it will take many years before that is an issue.
 
I'm with @brosky

Get the smaller trailer if you really don't think you'll use it for anything heavier than the tractor, but get brakes regardless. The 80 will do better with trailer brakes even on a 1500# camper. I have tried to keep my brakes in tip-top shape, but they work hard when towing. One road trip can take 1/4 the life of my pads. Accidents happen close to home.
 
In addition to the trailer talk, I'm also looking for those who have trailered similar loads with their LC. It's not a power house going, nor stopping, which again is why I'm trying to decide if it's better to be close to the capacity of the trailer or the capacity of the tow vehicle. Thanks!!

I've regularly tow the 2700LB Scout trailer below with my '97LX. Over the last 4 years I've logged about 5000 miles towing throughout the Mid-Atlantic up into New England. The trailer is PA tagged and has no brakes.

The 80 can certainly do the job, but you have to be on your toes all the time, anticipate merges, braking, and use downshifting to assist braking when possible. I have done a few panic freeway speed stops and its not fun :oops:. Our next set of gear trailers will definitely have brakes even though PA doesn't require them under 3Klb.

I do keep the 80's brakes and cooling system in top shape, as well as have air bags in the rear to handle the tongue weight.

Scout Trailer.JPG
 
I've regularly tow the 2700LB Scout trailer below with my '97LX. Over the last 4 years I've logged about 5000 miles towing throughout the Mid-Atlantic up into New England. The trailer is PA tagged and has no brakes.

The 80 can certainly do the job, but you have to be on your toes all the time, anticipate merges, braking, and use downshifting to assist braking when possible. I have done a few panic freeway speed stops and its not fun :oops:. Our next set of gear trailers will definitely have brakes even though PA doesn't require them under 3Klb.

I do keep the 80's brakes and cooling system in top shape, as well as have air bags in the rear to handle the tongue weight.

View attachment 1984517

Thanks!!! Great info. I don't plan on much (if any) highway miles on the trailer. The tractor will be hauled on back roads <40 mph from my house to the properties. Still up in the air on which way to go. First time trailering it will be on Monday and it's already a conflict since my buddy wants to take his Gator to the property also, so looks like I'll have to pull the trigger sooner that later.
 
I just towed my 3500Lb 25 ft bay boat on a dual axle trailer on back country bumpy a**roads through the rain for about 1/2 hour . No big thing. Of course, make sure you do all the correct stuff, and use a pin to keep the trailer latched.
 
If you were doing a 4x8, 5x8, 5x10 enclosed, that is one thing, but for a tractor, you want a dual axle with brake controller.
 
Just my $0.02. Whatever size trailer you think you need, plan to go the next size bigger to allow for any attachments, extra weight, etc. So I would highly recommend the tandem with brakes, and also a weight distribution hitch and sway controller.
 
Just my $0.02. Whatever size trailer you think you need, plan to go the next size bigger to allow for any attachments, extra weight, etc.


This. Trailers are extremely useful, especially if you don't have a pickup.
 
id go woth the single axel and add the trailer brakes after it goes to the property if you think that you need them. im assuming that the tractor will be there for a while so if you do decide to add the brakes youll have some time to find a kit thatll work for you. Electric Trailer Brake Kits
 
If you were doing a 4x8, 5x8, 5x10 enclosed, that is one thing, but for a tractor, you want a dual axle with brake controller.

Not sure what you mean? 5x10 enclosed? I thought it was more about capacity (weight) than type of equipment? Why do you feel that a tractor needs dual axle & brake controller? If it were 1800# of plywood, would that be different?

Just my $0.02. Whatever size trailer you think you need, plan to go the next size bigger to allow for any attachments, extra weight, etc. So I would highly recommend the tandem with brakes, and also a weight distribution hitch and sway controller.

This is the rabbit hole that concerns me. Where does it stop? A 10' trailer will haul my B7100 (SCUT) by itself without issues, so a 12' would give a little breathing room and a 14' would give me the ability to haul it with the finish mower attached, not that I need to do that. A 16' gives me the ability to haul the tractor with the brush hog, but I would be close to the weight capacity on a single axle. Going to a double axle, if I'm getting 7000# GVW, do I then go to 18' - 20' and really be able to stretch out and load the trailer and have a 1 ton behemoth that I need the tractor to move around, along with needing a much larger area to turn around and maneuver? Again my main use is to take a SCUT to my hunting lease with my stock LC, ie: dirt roads and not a lot of room for turning around. Plus, leaving the property is an adventure as I'm pulling out of a reasonably steep grade (uphill) crossing traffic on a somewhat blind turn towards me. So, again, the lighter the load the better with those parameters IMHO. So, I've sort of limited my choices to a 14'-16' single utility trailer that will be about 1k# on its own or a 16' car hauler (double axle) that will be around 1.7k# on it's own. The trailering weight will be 2.7k# to 3.5k#. I'm looking to get the best of these three - weight, capacity (length, more than weight), and maneuverability (ie: not too long)

I'll probably be looking (with money:)) this upcoming week. Thanks for all the input!!!!
 
Really these trucks weren't made for towing and 25 years later doesn't make it better. So go light be happy.
 
Why not custom order the trailer that best suits your needs, a car hauler is way to wide behind a 80 and adds weight. You could order a 5'x12' or 14' double axle with brakes, would not weigh much more the a single axle and would be a perfect all around trailer for a 80. A double axle trailer pulls, backs up and distributes the load better than a single axle trailer. Been pulling carp around in all kinds of trailers for 45 years so I speak form experience.
 

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