Hard Brake Line Replacement/Repair

jmvar

 
Joined
Feb 22, 2007
Messages
462
Location
Germantown MD
Some of the hard brake lines on my '95 aren't looking so great. There is some corrosion on specific spots and I am trying to figure out if it is better to replace the entire line with OEM lines or cut, flare, and add a new section the the current lines.

The lines I am looking at are:

The line going from the hard line to soft rubber line next to the front passenger wheel. This line goes up into the engine compartment and accross the entire firewall.

The other two lines run along the entire frame rail from front to back of the truck on the driver's side.

I am sure someone has replaced these in the past. Does everything along the firewall need to be removed to replace the line or can it be snaked in there and replaced?

Does the gas tank and other components need to be removed to replace the 2 lines along the drivers side frame rail?

Thanks
 
Joined
Jan 13, 2011
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243
Location
Denmark
I replaced the two pipes along the frame a couple of years ago.
It was only the section from the middle and back that was bad, so i cut the in a easy to reach spot, flared them, and join them together with new copper pipes. The back section is, not easy, but doable, to tuck in between frame and tank in the original pipe-holders.
It is, in Denmark, okay to cut a brakepipe and join it together, if it is one that goes from front to rear.
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2011
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587
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Toronto, NSW, Australia
Good luck getting new OEM parts for them. Some of the connectors (called 'ways' by Toyota) are available but I'm not sure any of the hard lines themselves are. Might get lucky though.
 
Joined
Sep 20, 2018
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wi
Bulk coated brake line is ~$1/foot. You can reuse the fittings. The flaring tool is <$20 at hobofreight.
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2014
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I replaced the two pipes along the frame a couple of years ago.
It was only the section from the middle and back that was bad, so i cut the in a easy to reach spot, flared them, and join them together with new copper pipes. The back section is, not easy, but doable, to tuck in between frame and tank in the original pipe-holders.
It is, in Denmark, okay to cut a brakepipe and join it together, if it is one that goes from front to rear.
Copper does not have the strength to be used as a brake line, this is really dangerous. Copper-Nickel alloy makes great brake lines, its easy to work with and corrosion resistant, is this what you were referring to?

I replaced almost all of the hard lines on my 94 about 3 years ago. I got most of the lines from Beno (Toyota parts), the lines were surprisingly inexpensive. I got a cheap flare tool and some flare nuts and made the rest of the line with copper-nickel tubing- the homemade line don't looks quite as pretty but they were easy to make and have worked perfectly for a few years now.
 

jmvar

 
Joined
Feb 22, 2007
Messages
462
Location
Germantown MD
@Landseer, were you able to replace the lines running along the driver's side frame rail without dropping the gas tank or removing anything else? Which lines did you choose to make yourself and why?

THanks
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2014
Messages
437
I was able to replace the lines along the driver's side frame rail without dropping the tank. The only issue I had was there was one brake line bracket on the frame rail that I couldn't get unbolted due to a combination of rust and the fuel tank limiting access to the bolt. I ended up just bending the bracket, the old lines popped out, the new lines snapped in easily and just bent the bracket back.

I bought most of the lines I thought I'd need from Beno (Land Cruiser Parts and Consulting) mainly because I'd not made brake lines before. One of the lines I need was no longer available and the 2 lines along the frame rail are too large to reasonably ship, I ended up making these along with a couple small lines I forgot to order.

I used copper nickel tubing for all my new lines, I highly suggest this as 1) copper nickel is much easier to work with than steel and 2) copper nickel is much more corrosion resistant than mild steel and its relatively inexpensive. If I were doing this again I'd probably make my own line mainly because of the superior corrosion resistance of the copper nickel. On the other hand, Toyota lines are easy and cheap (or at least they were) and lasted 20+ years so also a good option.
 
Joined
Jan 13, 2011
Messages
243
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Denmark
Copper does not have the strength to be used as a brake line, this is really dangerous. Copper-Nickel alloy makes great brake lines, its easy to work with and corrosion resistant, is this what you were referring to?

I replaced almost all of the hard lines on my 94 about 3 years ago. I got most of the lines from Beno (Toyota parts), the lines were surprisingly inexpensive. I got a cheap flare tool and some flare nuts and made the rest of the line with copper-nickel tubing- the homemade line don't looks quite as pretty but they were easy to make and have worked perfectly for a few years now.
I have heard that rumor before. Fact is that copper has been used as brakepipes for more than 35 years (maybe longer but I am only 44) in Denmark and I have yet to see or hear of a brake failure because of that.
I know there is also copper-nickel, and it is easier to work with but also more expensive.

every vehicle in DK has to pass a test every 2. year, some every year, and the steel pipes tends to rust and then the vehicle will dump the test and not be road legal anymore.
But the cars that have the brakelines replaced with copper passes the test without problems.
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
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1,673
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Jersey, 07740
the lines are available and very cheep from Toyota, I replace my rear lines on the frame rail when I had the tank out for repair.

you could make your own as there are preflared brake lines of various lengths you could use if you didn't want to get a roll of tubing and flare them yourself. might be worthwhile to change the soft lines as well
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2014
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@618Henrik Do you have specs on the copper line you used / what is commonly used on Denmark? Most copper tubing of the appropriate size has a max working pressure of about 1,700 psi with a factor of safety of 4 indicating a burst pressure of 6,800 psi. A typical automotive brake system can generate pressures of about 2,000 psi so while you could use copper you're not going to have nearly the safety margin compared to steel/copper-nickel. Also, any imperfections in the tubing (including bends) will lower the pressure the tubing can withstand.

I'm not saying you cant use copper, it just starts to look pretty unsafe especially once you factor in corrosion, fatigue, etc. Maybe the copper tubing available in Denmark is a different alloy than what available in The States?
 
Joined
Jan 13, 2011
Messages
243
Location
Denmark
@618Henrik Do you have specs on the copper line you used / what is commonly used on Denmark? Most copper tubing of the appropriate size has a max working pressure of about 1,700 psi with a factor of safety of 4 indicating a burst pressure of 6,800 psi. A typical automotive brake system can generate pressures of about 2,000 psi so while you could use copper you're not going to have nearly the safety margin compared to steel/copper-nickel. Also, any imperfections in the tubing (including bends) will lower the pressure the tubing can withstand.

I'm not saying you cant use copper, it just starts to look pretty unsafe especially once you factor in corrosion, fatigue, etc. Maybe the copper tubing available in Denmark is a different alloy than what available in The States?
No, unfortunately cant find any specs. But now I am curious and will try to write to a danish factory, who makes complete pipe kits in both copper, copper-nickel and steel..

will post their answer here...
 
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