BJ73 1985 Power steering pump rebuild (1 Viewer)

Joined
Sep 11, 2020
Messages
94
Location
Leverkusen , Germany
The Power steering pump / vane pump on my BJ73 was 'sweating' ever since I got the truck. But yesterday I lost almost all of the reservoir in just a two hours ride.
Apparently its dripping from the flow control valve spring seat. The O ring there is finished, I guess. Time for a rebuild.
There is a sealing kit available which has all O rings and oilseals and clips in it.
But this pump had likely never been opened... And I never did such a job before. I searched the forum but didn't find a rebuild threat.

My questions
Any advice beside the repair manual instructions?
Will the seal kit do the job or am I likely to need other parts like bearings and vane plates, too? (Haven't found sources for these parts in EU yet)

Thanks foe advice Best regards
Ralf
 
Joined
Jul 3, 2004
Messages
4,017
Location
Anchorage, AK
Mine was leaking from the output (name?) shaft. I ordered the seal but it was superseded by a newer number which was a totally wrong size. I took measurements and went to a local industrial supply store and found a aftermarket seal and ordered it. Put it in and it still leaked. So ordered two just a tad oversized(tighter) for the inner diameter. Second time I had it apart I noticed a definite groove in the shaft from the seal running on it over the last 30 some yrs. I put in the new seal and it worked for a little bit. Then remembering the groove I just installed the second seal next to the first seal. It hasn’t leaked so far. It is a little tricky to get all the balls and stuff to line up, but probably not for someone that rebuilds these all the time, they probably know all the tricks. Good luck.
 
Joined
Sep 11, 2020
Messages
94
Location
Leverkusen , Germany
Here is a pic of the suspected main leakage. The O Ring of the spring seat..
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Joined
Sep 11, 2020
Messages
94
Location
Leverkusen , Germany
Mine was leaking from the output (name?) shaft. I ordered the seal but it was superseded by a newer number which was a totally wrong size. I took measurements and went to a local industrial supply store and found a aftermarket seal and ordered it. Put it in and it still leaked. So ordered two just a tad oversized(tighter) for the inner diameter. Second time I had it apart I noticed a definite groove in the shaft from the seal running on it over the last 30 some yrs. I put in the new seal and it worked for a little bit. Then remembering the groove I just installed the second seal next to the first seal. It hasn’t leaked so far. It is a little tricky to get all the balls and stuff to line up, but probably not for someone that rebuilds these all the time, they probably know all the tricks. Good luck.
I believe your pump might be quite different from mine. But thanks for the hint. I will check the shafts for grooves, Fingers crossed to find them ok. The shaft is not leaking, but the O Rings of the housing front and rear. That's why it is so oily over all, I guess.
 
Joined
May 21, 2006
Messages
437
Location
Rotoiti, New Zealand
I haven't done a BJ73 one but I have rebuilt other Toyota PS pumps. Not too difficult. Just be very careful about all the small parts, make notes, take pics so you know where they go. The bearing on my 1Uz pump is a standard size available from SKF or similar.

Cheers
Clint
 
Joined
Sep 11, 2020
Messages
94
Location
Leverkusen , Germany
No success to undo the pulley nut.
Neither WD40 nor heat helped.
I suppose this is a normal right-hand thread?!
Or is it a left-hand? Does anybody know?

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Joined
Jul 22, 2003
Messages
18,376
Location
Perth Western Australia
Will the seal kit do the job or am I likely to need other parts like bearings and vane plates, too?

When I got a shop to rebuild a PS pump for a 1HZ he showed me that the PO hadn't changed the fluid very often. Where rubber seals were touching the shaft, grit had collected there and worn grooves in the shaft. But he thought he could smooth them out and he did and it worked great for the next 6 years of ownership.
Its going to be a case you wont know until you look.
 
Joined
Sep 11, 2020
Messages
94
Location
Leverkusen , Germany
Quick update. It IS a normal right-hand nut. I managed to eventually undo the nut by giving it a good overnight soak in WD40, firmly hitting it with hammer and chisel (autsch, I hope the bearing and bushing didn't suffer) and eventually using a ring wrench and some hammering again.
But HERE IS THE TRICK that made the difference:
It's all about locking the pulley. This video on YouTube shows a smart and effective way to do it. Worked perfectly for me.
I used an original belt from the vane pump drive, which I had replaced but saved as a spare. Putting it round the crancshaft- and pump pulley, bypassing the tensioning pulley, its just long enough to loop / lift the lower line to the upper line so it can snap in between the upper line and the pump pulley. The more force is placed on the pulley now, the harder it snaps and locks the pulley.
Some wire helps keeping the lines together. Probably also works with any strap.
More to come...

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Joined
Sep 11, 2020
Messages
94
Location
Leverkusen , Germany
Got the pump removed and disassembled.
Prying out the oil seal isn't easy. Using hammer and chisel, as the manual suggests, isn't easy and there is a significant risk to damage the seat or the shaft. I drilled a hole trough the metal to get into it and preyed it out. Kind of a massacre though..
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The pump came apart nicely.
To remove the rotor and vane plates, I placed a rubber band around it. However the plates still tend to fall out once you lift the rotor. So I placed the housing back on, turned the pack over and removed housing and shaft. The rotor now lays on the plate an you can shift it sideways on a flat piece of plastic or sheet metal without lifting it.
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The bearing is an absolute standard 6203 bearing. Mine was an NSK. It doesn't feel good...
Also the pulley nut is badly worn.
So I have to order some more parts.
PAUSE
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Joined
Sep 11, 2020
Messages
94
Location
Leverkusen , Germany
The bearing and new nut, spring washer and washer for the pulley arrived today. A 60203 standard bearing from SKF. With this absolute standard bearing, the actual manufacturer imho doesn't make a difference. Just go for good quality. Let's go on
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Steps according to the manual...
1. Spring seat and snap ring. New O ring. Push it in from the end where it will sit. You may use an M6 to adjust it.
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2. & 3. Spring, Valve an Pressure Union.
Lubricate well using ATF. 2 new O rings: One on the union, one in the housing. Torque to spec 69Nm.
I didn't change the Union seat. It didn't look worn. There are actually two different seats in the sealing kit. I think for different models maybe.
I don't have a screw extractor to get it out, have no idea which one has to go back in and how to do it :rolleyes:, so I didn't do it.
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(arg pictures ain't sharp. Sorry)
 
Joined
Sep 11, 2020
Messages
94
Location
Leverkusen , Germany
Intermezzo: Install bearing to rotor shaft & C clip
As I don't have a press, I placed the bearing flat on a vise, supporting the inner ring. Give it a good lube and tap in the shaft using a plastic faced hammer.
The C clip is nasty. I spread it wit snapring pliers and moved it over the shaft IN the groove it is supposed to sit. It bended open a bit however, so I used wide pliers to press / bend it tight. Worked well.
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4. & 5. Rotor shaft to front housing & snapring
A deep socket would be the perfect tool to tap in shaft and bearing. I haven't, though. So I tapped it in using a punch. Light taps round a round... be careful not to hit the edge of the housing! Snapring comes last.
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Joined
Sep 11, 2020
Messages
94
Location
Leverkusen , Germany
6 Oil seal
Tap in the oil seal. Lube well. A nut is a good tool, however it is difficult to apply force equally and not to tilt the oil seal. I eventually used the punch again, like on the bearing.
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The manual calls for the new O ring earlier, but I didn't want to have it on already when clamping the thing into the vise, still, to install the oil seal. So I placed it only now. (Well, accurately, please ;) )
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Joined
Sep 11, 2020
Messages
94
Location
Leverkusen , Germany
Now for the fun part..
7, 8, 9 cam ring, rotor, vane plates

I did it a bit different from the manual...
On disassembly, I managed to keep the rotor and vane plates together without falling apart, by 1st removing the cam ring and then holding the vane plates in place with a rubber band around the rotor.
I removed this pack from the splined shaft by turning the two housings (back placed again and holding the two housings together) upside down and removing the shaft + housing upwards. The rotor pack lay on the back plate and I carefully slid it sideways on a plastic sheet WITHOUT lifting it.
For the reassembly I went almost reverse steps:
1. Make sure the rotor pack lays on your sheet upside down: The marking dot down!
2. Pick up the pack by inserting the spline shaft. Turn the stuff around by pressing your plate to the rotor pack in order to keep the vane plates in place.
A big nut, 3/4" drive, for the shaft at the oilseal to slide in, makes a perfect stand.
3. Once turned you can slide the sheet sideways to remove it. Don't lift it off! The vane plates are oily and will stick to it.
The rotor pack now sits on the spline shaft on the front plate, with the marking dot up, as required.
4. Move the rubber band down as far as possible. Make sure it doesn't get under the rotor, though.
5. Place the cam ring. Marking diamond up, as requested. It will sit on the adjusting pins and cover half of the vane plates before eventually resting on the rubber band. Put a few drops of ATF on the rotor.
6. Grab the rubber band through the gap between cam ring and bottom front plate and pull it out. Use a pair of tweezers or needle nose pliers.
Cut the rubber band and pull it out. The lub helps this.
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Cut the rubber band and pull it out. Cam ring gets in place.
 
Joined
Sep 11, 2020
Messages
94
Location
Leverkusen , Germany
:nailbiting:10 & 11 Rear plate, spring and rear housing

Two new O rings go on the rear plate. One sits inside in the nipple on the back.
Place the rear plate on top, adjusting to the pins. Place the spring on top, centered.
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Lube the inner of the rear housing with ATF, in particular the bushing in the middle.
Be clear on what the correct orientation of the rear housing needs to be. Spot your match marks.
Place the rear housing on the tower. You need to press it down and turning it a few degrees left - right in order for the O ring in that nipple of the rear plate to slide over the bushing in the housing. You can't see how that works out, just feel it :nailbiting: .
Place the housing bolts with new spring washers and hand-thighten.
Check for easy rotation.
Put the pump in a vise and thigthten the bolts to spec ( 46 Nm) in several passes. Using a torque wrench is imperative here.
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12. Suction port union
I didn't install the suction port union on the workbench, but mounted the pump back into the engine bay first. I had the suction port union left attached to the hose and reservoir anyway.
Once in place, I connected the pressure port and then filled the pump with fresh ATF through the suction port. Let it settle. It takes a few passes.
Mounted the suction port union with a new O ring then.
Put the pulley with the key, washer, spring washer and nut (torque to 46Nm. This spec is not within the chapter of the manual but given at the end in the spec section).
The trick with the strap snapping under the pulley helps locking it in order to torque the nut. (See video above).
Install the drive belt and you are done ! :bounce:
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