Question Regarding Bleeding After Front Brake Service (1 Viewer)

Joined
Dec 11, 2012
Messages
83
While performing the birf seal service on my '92 80, I noticed the pads and caliper hoses on my front end needed replacement. With that done, I now need to bleed my brakes. I'm left with a quick question that isn't quite answered by the search function. Can I simply bleed the front calipers or is it necessary to do all four corners?
 
Joined
Jul 11, 2013
Messages
444
It woudn't hurt to flush all nasty fluid. Don't overstroke master cylinder, you'll kill it. (All but 1/2 inch of cylinder bore is like sand paper.)
 
Joined
Dec 11, 2012
Messages
83
It woudn't hurt to flush all nasty fluid. Don't overstroke master cylinder, you'll kill it. (All but 1/2 inch of cylinder bore is like sand paper.)
I'm not familiar with the term of overstroking the master cylinder. I'm pretty sure I could take a guess at what you mean, but if you can clarify for me, that'd be great. :)

Thanks for the input, everyone. Based on what you folks are saying, it must not be a dual circuit brake system, which is what necessitates bleeding the whole system in this case?
 
Joined
Jul 11, 2013
Messages
444
In normal operation pistons and seals inside master cylinder only move 1/2 inch. The remander of bore gets rusty. Get a pressure bleeder and you won't have to worry.
 
Joined
Dec 11, 2012
Messages
83
In normal operation pistons and seals inside master cylinder only move 1/2 inch. The remander of bore gets rusty. Get a pressure bleeder and you won't have to worry.
If I'm unable to locate a pressure bleeder, I'll need to be aware of the limitations. I can get some sort of object or piece of wood to limit pedal travel for pumping, but does anyone here know how far pedal travel needs to be limited to in order to avoid overstroking? Can my assistant use a series of short pedal applications to avoid this?
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top Bottom