Maintenance now no start (1 Viewer)

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I know the rule is replace on thing at a time. But you know how it goes, you pull out one thing and there's always another "while you're in there".

Anyway, I replaced my PHH. While I was at it, I put in a new Denso starter, a new Denso alternator, a new Denso fuel filter, new cap, rotor, plugs and wires, new PCV valve and the two gray hoses and new Toyota belts. Also pulled distributor to replace the o ring. It ran and started great right before. Also new igniter.

Today was first time I tried to start it. Cranks but doesn't start. Pulls air in the intake, starter cranks, battery was putting out 12.5 volts (on charger now). I put the crank pulley at 0 degrees with rotor at 11 o'clock before pulling and put it back in at same orientation. It rotated slightly to the right when inserted. I marked position of bolt prior to removing. Confirmed all plug wires connected to correct spot on cap.

Confirmed it's not the NSS. I am lost on this one. Also fuel tank is nearly full.
 
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Did you plug in all the connectors after reinstalling the distributor?
Is the coil pack and coil wire connected to the distributor?
Are any of the wires on the plug on top of the distributor cracked/broken/corroded/pulled out?
 
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I think, looking at OTRAMM's o ring video, that I did not have the distributor correctly aligned when I put it back in. I'm going to pull it back out in the morning and try that first. Then I'll see if it fires up.
 
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Did you plug in all the connectors after reinstalling the distributor?
Is the coil pack and coil wire connected to the distributor?
Are any of the wires on the plug on top of the distributor cracked/broken/corroded/pulled out?

Yes, thanks. I double checked that and plugged in my old working coil pack to verify that part at least. I will take another look at it to make sure all the connector wires are good on top of the distributor.
 
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That's a very good possibility, but I haven't seen a flashing CEL before. It'd be interesting to see and the fix.

I'll get a video of it here in a few and post it up. There is always the chance that I am misreading it. I just bought a Toyocom but it hasn't arrived yet. That would have been super handy.
 
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That's a very good possibility, but I haven't seen a flashing CEL before. It'd be interesting to see and the fix.
I have a video but forgot you can't upload directly to site. I don't have social media, so no other way to post it.
 

flintknapper

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I think, looking at OTRAMM's o ring video, that I did not have the distributor correctly aligned when I put it back in. I'm going to pull it back out in the morning and try that first. Then I'll see if it fires up.

Make sure you are TDC on the compression stroke first and not the beginning of the exhaust stroke.

Distributor has two marks (one on the body, one on the gear) that you'll want to line up before inserting it into the bore in the head. Try to roughly line up the center of the lock nut slot on the body of the distributor with the center of the bolt hole as you push the distributor straight in, don't twist it at all.

Your rotor will start at about 10 O'clock and rotate clockwise a small amount as it engages the cam gear, this is normal. You should end up with the rotor pointing roughly at the leading edge of the electrical connection when it seats.

Dizzy Install1.jpg
Dizzy Install2.jpg
Dizzy Install3.jpg
Dist Install2.jpg
 
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Awesome - thank you, helpful pictures. I just assumed naively that I could put it back in the way I pulled it out, according to the pointing of the rotor. However, I did not line up the marks. I will fix in the morning.[/QUOTE]
 
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Awesome - thank you, helpful pictures. I just assumed naively that I could put it back in the way I pulled it out, according to the pointing of the rotor. However, I did not line up the marks. I will fix in the morning.
[/QUOTE]
You could have, as long as you did not rotate the engine between removing and installing.

That said, did you line up the engine on TDC before you pulled the dizzy the first time?

I literally shut off my truck, pulled off the cap, marked the dizzy slot and took pics of the rotor location, remove the dizzy, changed the seal, reinstalled the dizzy so everything was back in the same location, and restarted. It does NOT have to be on TDC or on the compression stroke to do this, but you CANNOT turn the engine in between, and you MUST put things back in the exact same place they came out.

It's better if you have more work to do to set it at TDC on the compression stroke, because you have a permanent reference point. Had I rotated the engine or anything else, I would have had to take it to that point to do my install.
 

flintknapper

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Awesome - thank you, helpful pictures. I just assumed naively that I could put it back in the way I pulled it out, according to the pointing of the rotor. However, I did not line up the marks. I will fix in the morning.
[/QUOTE]

You can as @BILT4ME aptly points out above. IF it was running well (correctly timed) before you pulled it and IF you get it back exactly as it was before (both rotor and distributor body position) it 'should' return to normal when you stab it. But often folks get it off a tooth and rotate the distributor body some...further advancing or retarding the timing and the engine won't start or runs poorly until adjusted.

That is why I advocate just starting at TDC (compression stroke) and line up the witness marks on the dizzy. You have visual reference points that way. Takes about two minutes longer to do it using that method and greatly increases the chances it will fire up first time.

Pros and experienced DIYers can pluck it, re-stab it and be good to go. Those not doing this very often, not so much.
 
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You can as @BILT4ME aptly points out above. IF it was running well (correctly timed) before you pulled it and IF you get it back exactly as it was before (both rotor and distributor body position) it 'should' return to normal when you stab it. But often folks get it off a tooth and rotate the distributor body some...further advancing or retarding the timing and the engine won't start or runs poorly until adjusted.

That is why I advocate just starting at TDC (compression stroke) and line up the witness marks on the dizzy. You have visual reference points that way. Takes about two minutes longer to do it using that method and greatly increases the chances it will fire up first time.

Pros and experienced DIYers can pluck it, re-stab it and be good to go. Those not doing this very often, not so much.
[/QUOTE]

Okay, this is definitely the issue. I had to pull and align twice before I got it in and centered on the adjusting bolt. Could barely keep it running, but it started. I checked the timing and it was about -15 degrees. I clocked the distributor all the way clockwise and got it to about -2 degrees. That is put into diagnostic mode with a jumper. So I need to pull it again and make sure the rotor aligns where to correct? I attached photos of how it looked inserted.
 

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