Double Cardin reliability (1 Viewer)

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Sep 18, 2013
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I have just completed installing 60 series rear leafs in the rear of my bj40 (SUA).
One thing to note is that with the 60 series leaf springs I needed a longer tail shaft since the axle moved 65 mm further towards the rear.
I had a 60 series front tail shaft on the shelf as it had the double Cardin set up. Turns out this is just about the perfect length for the rear of my bj40 with the diff in the new position!
One question I do have: I had the double Cardin as a spare for my 6" lifted 80 series. When I was getting the front tail shaft modified to have the double Cardin installed, the driveshaft shop would not warrant the tail shaft as they said that the double Cardin is no good for constant use. My 80 series has a part time kit in it so I didn't worry - but seeing as I'm now using one in the rear of the 40 will this cause me reliability issues?
Anyone have any experience with constant use of a factory toyota double Cardin including runs at extended freeway speeds?
 

John Smith

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You need to find another drive line shop. People have logged hundreds of thousands of miles on DC drive shafts without issue, myself included.
 

John Smith

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I am running a DC from the front of a 85 Toyota mini truck that was shortened. I have a Toy Box, so a really short rear shaft. You want the DC at the transfer case end, and you want to point the pinion a few degrees below the center of the nut on the transfer case drive flange. The rear diff will want to raise on acceleration.
 
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Restating what John Smith said, but more strongly:

You can't just swap out the shaft with a different joint. If you have u-joints you need two. They have to be in phase or the shaft will wobble. If you have a double cardan (DC) joint at the t-case, the diff needs to point at the DC joint so the remaining u-joint doesn't cause the whole shaft to collapse and compress on every cycle.
 
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I'm guessing you used tapered shims to angle the diff?
Since I've put in the 60 series leafs, the rear axle has moved 65mm back, so my drive shaft angle has improved. Only using the DC because I had it in the shelf and it turned out to be the right length without needing modification.
 

John Smith

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I went SOA at the same time my axle moved back, so I just welded new perches on to change the angle. Use steel shims if you need them.
 
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I'm using the DC on the rear.
At present I've put it on the diff side (only because my old shaft was on that way by po).
I don't seem to have issues with crossmember. Should I swap it around to be in TC end?
Was that -1 to -3 deg or -1 to +3 deg?
I always thought that the diff pinion needed to be parallel with TC output shaft. Are you saying pinion needs to be almost in line with DS?
 
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I always thought that the diff pinion needed to be parallel with TC output shaft.

True if using two u-joints

Are you saying pinion needs to be almost in line with DS?

True if using a shaft with a double cardan joint.

1442346d1404091216t-vibration-problem-pinion-angle-double-cardan-shaft.jpg
 
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thats neg 1 to neg 3 degrees from pionion to driveshaft after you shim you check the pinion to drive sgaft should be neg 1 to neg 3 and the cv goes to the trasnsfer case you dont need the help opf a cv at dif cus its pitched
 

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