CV boot install (1 Viewer)

Joined
Oct 19, 2011
Messages
211
Location
Namibe, Angola
 
Was out in the bush this week and had a great time. Saw a number of new places, but in the process, something popped up, and managed to pop a hole in my driver side, inside CV boot...

Without a Toyota dealer around, nor any good shops, I'll do the work myself, but I do have some questions.

I'm looking at ordering a CV boot online to be shipped to Angola from the USA. Does anyone know if Febest supplies Toyota with OEM CV boots? They're all over eBay and amazon and look legit. Secondly, the CV boot clamps, are they 'ear' type, or 'ear-less' type? I need to purchase the proper set of pliers to do this job.

If anyone has some tips or a PDF of service manual, I'd love the help!

Thanks in advance!
 
Joined
May 5, 2014
Messages
5,364
Location
South Korea
 

Attachments

Joined
Oct 19, 2011
Messages
211
Location
Namibe, Angola
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2011
Messages
211
Location
Namibe, Angola
 
I had been having a hard time finding the previous part number myself. I started looking on TOYODIY before I did here, and that is where I got the 0442760090 part number. It was hard to find online though.

Thanks for connecting me with Partsouq too. It's $161 shipped for the cv boot set, which is not too bad, considering someone else is taking care of all the logistics.
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2011
Messages
211
Location
Namibe, Angola
 
Looking over the CV axle, once the hub is out of the way and disconnected from the cv axle, it looks as if there would be enough space to change the boot while the axle is on the vehicle. Crimping the bands shouldn't be a problem as there is space at various angles.

Has anyone ever done this, or know someone who's done it successfully? I've seen the youtube video's about slide over cone techniques, and pneumatic tools which stretch the rubber to easily get it over the first cv joint.

I'd rather not pull the CV from the diff if I didn't have to.

Thoughts?
 
Joined
May 5, 2014
Messages
5,364
Location
South Korea
 
You can leave the inner axel in the diff and re-assemble on the vehicle. Just remove the rest and assemble what you can. I've done it. Not the most elegant solution, but it's very doable.

Forgot to mention, you'll need a c-clip tool too. Otherwise you'll hate life getting it off to remove the birdcage.
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2011
Messages
211
Location
Namibe, Angola
 
Praise GOD! It really looked like it shouldn't need to come out.

I've got a c-clip tool. It's critical to nearly all axle work, and I used it a lot on my 80 series and Tacoma when replacing bushings or rebuilding the front end.
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2011
Messages
211
Location
Namibe, Angola
 
My CV boots just arrived from Dubai, and am now waiting on my boot clamp tool to arrive from the USA. It just dawned on me that my hub nut tool for the 80 series I sold, is probably not the same size as the one on the 200. Anyone know what size the hub nut on a 2016 200 is? 12 or 6 point?
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2011
Messages
211
Location
Namibe, Angola
 
By the time this cv boot swap is finished, I'll have purchased 3 tools/parts from 3 different countries, and waited weeks for it all to arrive...

To avoid doing this again, I'm going to assemble a list of specialty tools that I may need for 200 series repairs in the future. As I'm visiting the USA Dec-Feb, I think I'll get whatever I may need purchased and bring it back.

I've already got quite a comprehensive set of tools here with me. IE: full set of metric sockets, wrenches, large variety of screw drivers, pliers and a set of snap ring pliers, dead blow hammer, brass drive, etc. Soon I'll have a pair of cv boot clamp pliers, and will be borrowing the hub socket to finish the cv boot swap.

On my list of tools to purchase in the USA right now:
1. 39mm hub socket

On my list of easy to transport spares to purchase:
1. Spare OEM CV boots

Can anyone help me add to this list of specialty tools for the DIY guy, and some easy to transport (not heavy or large) spares to bring back?
 
Joined
May 5, 2014
Messages
5,364
Location
South Korea
 
Torque wrenches, I'm a proper torque guy from all my missile/bomb work. Sometimes it doesn't matter, but you'll never regret taking the time and having proper torque on a fastener.

Make sure you have JIS screwdrivers. Make life easier. Most people jab any Philips screwdriver into a hole and call it good. Great way to strip a JIS fastener.
 
Joined
Jan 17, 2016
Messages
2,949
Location
Chicago, IL, USA
I'm assuming the boot kit comes with grease. You'll want brake cleaner or something suitable to ensure the CV is clean and free of debris before reassembling.

You need a 250 ft/lb torque wrench for this. You're supposed to tighten the hub to something like 150 ft/lb, then back it off, then tighten down to 250 ft/lb. Skip this and you'll f*ck up your hubs. Ask me how I know.

Aside from a normal 1/2" socket set, I don't believe you should need a whole lot other than a 2x2 block of wood about a foot long and a BFH.

FWIW I'd use the McMaster-Carr rounded-edge worm drive clamps instead of the CV boot clamps. There's a kit out there for the 100-series and I believe the clamp sizes are the same. My CV boot clamps looked tight but were leaking grease, and the MM-C clamps fixed it.
 
Joined
Feb 17, 2018
Messages
3,365
Location
Seattle, WA
I'm assuming the boot kit comes with grease. You'll want brake cleaner or something suitable to ensure the CV is clean and free of debris before reassembling.

You need a 250 ft/lb torque wrench for this. You're supposed to tighten the hub to something like 150 ft/lb, then back it off, then tighten down to 250 ft/lb. Skip this and you'll f*ck up your hubs. Ask me how I know.

Aside from a normal 1/2" socket set, I don't believe you should need a whole lot other than a 2x2 block of wood about a foot long and a BFH.

FWIW I'd use the McMaster-Carr rounded-edge worm drive clamps instead of the CV boot clamps. There's a kit out there for the 100-series and I believe the clamp sizes are the same. My CV boot clamps looked tight but were leaking grease, and the MM-C clamps fixed it.
I didn't have the big torque wrench (mine maxed at 150lb/ft). The hub nut is a two tighten process, one tighten to 150 or something (see FSM for exact), then loosen and retighten to the 250lb. I did the 250 lb using gravity and length. I weigh 175lb. So put me 18 inch from the nut and I'm 257.5 lb feet (or so). Close enough. I put my 1/2" breaker bar on the nut, added a four foot pipe with a mark 18" from the end, put my feet on either side of the mark, and weighted gently (used the fender for balance). Easy.
 
Joined
May 5, 2014
Messages
5,364
Location
South Korea
 
I think the easiest way is spending a few bills and have cheap torque wrenches that'll cover everything on your rig. Here's what I have for my toss-around, mostly accurate, torque wrench kit. We have a couple Tektons at work, and they're within +-5 from the factory as tested at a precision measuring equipment lab. They start to lose their accuracy after a while though. That said, there's a reason expensive torque wrenches are expensive.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01M12284X/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00C5ZL1NS/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FMPKAD0/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Edit: But we mostly use Snap-on and Mitutoyo on the explodey stuff at work. The difference between a cheapo caliper and a Mitutoyo is night and day.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 17, 2018
Messages
3,365
Location
Seattle, WA
Admittedly a hub nut is one of the very few places gravity torque could be used due to space and angle restrictions, so I won’t argue having a macho torque isn’t necessary. However I think it is certainly as accurate as an inexpensive wrench would be. If anything add a small bounce and you’re for sure at the target torque.
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2011
Messages
211
Location
Namibe, Angola
 
Thanks for all the comments. My nice torque wrench was stolen last year. I bought a new one in South Africa which should do the job. I'll have to see if it's up to 250ft/lb though. If not, I'll ask my mechanic buddy tomorrow to see if he has one that big.

I'm not familiar with JIS screwdrivers. I've got a decent set of varying sized philips and slotted screwdrivers, and I'm not one to just jam them in. I always look for the best fit. Still, I do like to have the proper tool for the job.

As for the CV boots/clamps. I've got the OEM kit and will stick with that for now. When I'm back in the states and purchase a spare CV boot set, I'm also going to buy some more boot clamps. I'll look into the MMC ones. As Tony said, the kit comes with grease. Brake cleaner and basic stuff like that is easy to get here. It's the specialty stuff that is hard to come by.

Any other specialty tool recommendations?
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top Bottom