Broken exhaust Y stud... (1 Viewer)

Joined
Apr 25, 2016
Messages
171
Location
Austin, TX
Hey guys..

So a few months back, I had a local muffler shop install my new header-back exhaust. I noticed that it didn't sound exactly right (like a leak), and decided I would tackle that in the future. Well, that day came, and I noticed that the front-most flange wasn't fully seated. So, threw a bunch of liquid wrench penetrant at it, let it sit for a while, and tried to tighten it by hand. Nothing, tried as hard as I could with a 1/2in ratchet. Decided (regretably) to use my impact to just tap it a couple milimeters, and, well, it broke.

The stud in question (top side, can't see the broken side, look through the hole in the shield)..

IMG_20210402_172226.jpg


I've never run into a broken stud before. How screwed am I here? What should my next steps be to get this out, and also does anyone know the part #'s I would need? I'm trying to look at diagrams but it seems everything I'm finding omits the stud/nut.
 

SNLC

OCD
Supporting Vendor
Joined
Sep 9, 2004
Messages
7,506
Location
Boise - Idaho
That doesn’t look like a stud, so getting it out from the bottom won’t work. It also looks pretty rusty.

I would pull the manifolds to fix that correctly.

35B717E9-5A0B-4531-B756-97140B5C6D12.png
8C6E1988-B215-43B8-870A-CC705CF6D1FD.png
7DFA2E3B-A5AC-4C94-B02C-E8A562DADBFE.png


There are the studs, nuts and gaskets.

Cheers
 
Joined
Jan 5, 2017
Messages
2,752
Location
Charlotte, NC & Alexandria, VA
If I understand your description, this is the fiche you want (1701):

1617892011172.png


Oveseas shipping price:
1617892055618.png


Here's the domestic price:
1617892189170.png


Ignore the "this part doesn't fit your model" disclaimer.

As to how to fix your problem, there are a number of solutions.
My preferred solution would be to weld a grade 8 bolt to the stud and soak the stud with a good penetrant (PB Blaster Kroil, ATF/acetone, etc) for as long as you can be without the truck, apply a judicious amount of targeted heat (a #0 or #1 brazing tip is ideal) and unscrew the stud. The advantage of this method is that it works regardless opf whether the problem child is a stuck bolt or stud.

If you don't have access to a torch, and if there is enough stud protruding (I can't tell from your photo), you might be able to cut, or grind, a slot or pair of flats on the exposed stud and, after applying penetrant, unscrew it.

The very last thing I'd recommend trying is to drill the stud and use an extractor. These have always broken when I tried them and created a bigger problem to solve.

This is a very large PITA problem to solve, IMPO, and I wish you the best of luck. Be patient and it will come out. You won't want to hear this, and I wouldn't either, but I'll say it just for the sake of saying it: this'll be a lot easier with the engine out.
 

YMT

Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
407
Location
El Portal, CA
Given space constraints, I feel your two options are either to remove the manifolds, or to drill it out, if you don't want to start pulling body panels.

I had a similar issue and had to remove the inner fender (already doing a body swap, so wasn't much more) to get better access. There's other threads which detail replacing the studs with, I believe M12 bolts.

It's much easier without the inner fender in place, if you're able to have your vehicle down for that long.
Or, take it to a shop and have them do it, if you don't have the tools.
 
Joined
Apr 25, 2016
Messages
171
Location
Austin, TX
If I understand your description, this is the fiche you want (1701):

View attachment 2639056

Oveseas shipping price:
View attachment 2639057

Here's the domestic price:
View attachment 2639061

Ignore the "this part doesn't fit your model" disclaimer.

As to how to fix your problem, there are a number of solutions.
My preferred solution would be to weld a grade 8 bolt to the stud and soak the stud with a good penetrant (PB Blaster Kroil, ATF/acetone, etc) for as long as you can be without the truck, apply a judicious amount of targeted heat (a #0 or #1 brazing tip is ideal) and unscrew the stud. The advantage of this method is that it works regardless opf whether the problem child is a stuck bolt or stud.

If you don't have access to a torch, and if there is enough stud protruding (I can't tell from your photo), you might be able to cut, or grind, a slot or pair of flats on the exposed stud and, after applying penetrant, unscrew it.

The very last thing I'd recommend trying is to drill the stud and use an extractor. These have always broken when I tried them and created a bigger problem to solve.

This is a very large PITA problem to solve, IMPO, and I wish you the best of luck. Be patient and it will come out. You won't want to hear this, and I wouldn't either, but I'll say it just for the sake of saying it: this'll be a lot easier with the engine out.

Thanks for the info! Maybe manifold back isn't the right descirption, the OEM manifolds are stock and have not been removed. The stud that is broken is the one connecting the maniflod to the y-pipe. Here are some better pics..

IMG_20210408_143145.jpg
IMG_20210408_143200.jpg
 

bencallaway

SILVER Star
Joined
Sep 28, 2018
Messages
594
Location
Atlanta
You’re getting the right advice here. Pull the manifold and you should be able to grab the broken stud and lefty loosey it with some vice grips. It’s not a difficult job. Order the above referenced replacement parts from Partsouq and you’ll be good to go. Gasket for both sides of the manifold and the stud and nut.
 
Joined
Jul 20, 2013
Messages
309
Location
Albuquerque, NM
I have also sheared off both studs on one of those manifolds. Your best move is definitely welding on a nut to the stud and backing it out. Welding on the nut doesn't just give you something to put the wrench on - the stud gets super hot when you weld to it and it breaks the bond between the threads of the stud and the threads of the manifold. I've had to use this technique somewhat regularly, and if you get the stud nice and hot when you weld to it, it will back right out. If you are good with the welder, the stud can be completely recessed within the manifold and you can still weld to it just fine.

If possible, removing the manifold from the vehicle will make things significantly easier. If the stud protrudes far enough, you could try getting some vice grips on the stud and applying heat (acetylene - propane doesn't get hot enough to do anything IME), but personally I would just go right for the welder.

One last thought - if you don't have a welder or know someone who does, perhaps just picking up a used manifold and swapping it out for the one you have could be the easiest/fastest solution?

1617909500425.png
 

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