Auto transmission 'L' gear (1 Viewer)

Joined
Feb 3, 2011
Messages
731
Location
Northern Territory Outback Australia
Hi all,

I was reading a bit about the low gear function on the auto 80 and am sure I remember reading that L gear will provide extra wheeling stability in that a wheel off the groud wont spin by itself and power will be delivered to both wheels equally, plus the gesr ratios are differenyt between H and L

I was just talking with a bloke at work whos a very keen 4wder and he says he would not use L to drive in mud (I though L in mud was a good idea?)

He said it would actually help me get bogged and doesn't think that there are any benefits to L gear in boggy areas. He says only the revs will change Whats the truth?
 
Joined
Jan 16, 2011
Messages
393
Location
Florida
 
For mud. more speed and wheelspin are your friends...wheelspin to clean the tires and speed to plow you through the goo
 
Joined
Aug 26, 2009
Messages
5,757
Location
flat earth Midwest
 
 
crooozer,
I think you're confusing Low Range with locking diffs just a little here.

The only way you'll be able to lock between the wheels on the same axle is if you have diff locks.

Not sure if Australian spec 80s are the same as US spec, but here engaging Low range automatically locks the inter-axle differential between the front and rear axles, at least in the 95-97 model years. Earlier model years had a inter-axle lock switch on the dash from the factory. Full details in the MUD 80 Faq section:
https://forum.ih8mud.com/80-series-tech/2151-low-without-center-diff-locked.html

What we do here is get a diff lock switch (or a cheaper switch that works the same) pull the center dash off and find a tapped over plug behind the dash to connect it to. Then there is the 7-pin mod, which allows selection of inter-axle lock to your needs whether you are in Hi or Low range. My guess is what you want in the bog is Hi range, inter-axle locked for best performance there.

I'd agree that in most cases, Low range will cause more problems than its worth in the muck. It's too easy to spin the tires, which doesn't help them get a bit when you need traction the most.
 
Joined
Dec 27, 2009
Messages
134
Is it difficult or taKE A LONG TIME TO REMOVE DIFF LOCKS FROM AN lx450 AND PUT THEM IN A lc?
It would easier to just swap the entire axle than just try and remove the locking diff from the axle and swap it into the new rig. You will also need the wiring harness for the the diff lockers on the axles.
 
Joined
Feb 25, 2009
Messages
3,575
Location
Richmond, VA
It is kind of like running on snowy icy trails.
I usually run in high, because low creates more torque and wheel slipage.
 
Joined
Aug 26, 2009
Messages
5,757
Location
flat earth Midwest
 
 
Thanks everyone.

So it seems my workmate is right, he says L gear is mainly for running up steep rocky stuff when you need immediate power,
Crawling is what Low range is good for. Often, that is steep inclines. But it can also be used in a situation where you want the truck to move more precisely and with extra power. To do the "precise" thing takes a little practice, especially if you have a lead foot in Hi range;)

Low range also increase the compression braking available from the engine when going downhill. It doesn't eliminate the need to use the brakes, but does reduce it, although not as much as a manual transmission vehicle.

We Americans got stuck with auto-only 80s. It's the first auto tranny vehicle I've ever owned, so far, so good.
 
Joined
May 26, 2005
Messages
7,801
Location
Phoenix
 
 
 
Thanks everyone.

So it seems my workmate is right, he says L gear is mainly for running up steep rocky stuff when you need immediate power,
Got CDL switch? If not, you don't have true 4wd in high range. At least not in the US, anyway.
 
Joined
May 26, 2005
Messages
7,801
Location
Phoenix
 
 
 
For future reference, it would be really helpful to know just exactly what you're driving. This issue has come up in several of your threads. You also might want to read the FAQ's.
 

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