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2" ball vs 360 degrees coupler?

Discussion in '200-Series Cruisers' started by Dan Lee, May 16, 2018 at 11:00 AM.

  1. Dan Lee

    Dan Lee

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    Hi, I'm planning to get a trailer (probably standard utility; 5x8 or 5x10 with 15" wheels) to transport kayaks and stuff. The destinations will include both on-road (ie - boat ramps) as well as off-pavement launches (ie - lakeside/river side/beaches).

    I'm not planning to do any technically difficult trails. But there are spots that have some short but steep elevation changes and some rocks to drive over. And other challenges for destinations still unknown.

    The LX570 by itself handles this w/out issue. My question is about the hitch. Given that the off pavement roads are not smooth, at what point should I be using a coupling that articulates more than a 2" ball hitch? Is the 2" ball hitch pretty capable and just can't handle the off-road stuff (off pavement usually mild enough)? Or is 2" ball really just designed for pavement and anything off pavement should be using a different coupler? (ie - Max Coupler? McHitch? Pintel?)

    Or is the coupler not an issue -- I'm actually going to be limited by the trailer length with 15" wheels? This will be a problem regardless of coupling unless I have a shorter trailer (< 6'?) and larger wheels (20"?)?

    Thanks
     
  2. tabraha

    tabraha Hello My Name is: TAD SILVER Star

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    I've had really good results with a standard ball BUT I do have a Max Coupler hitch I can put on if I know I'm going somewhere gnarly. Unless you are going onto some moderate+ trails save your money.

    I've seen a couple people with max couplers roll their trailers on their side and stay attached. Flip the trailer upright and carry on. :cool:
     
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  3. Dan Lee

    Dan Lee

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    Great! Thanks for the info. So, aside from inherent challenges that might be posed by a long-ish trailer (5x10), the 2" ball should be capable for easy+ trails.
     
  4. RET2

    RET2 SILVER Star

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    You should consider changing the trailer to the same bolt pattern/ tire size as the tow vehicle as it makes things easier?
     
  5. hedd

    hedd

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    A bit different but might be helpful. I have a 5x8 utiltity trailer that I use on the road with the LC and also with my small tractor. I have a quick adaptor for the backhoe that allows me to remove the bucket and put a hitch on the end of the backhoe. I have pushed that trailer into a lot of odd angles and it hasn’t come undone. Even with a full load of wood on the trailer and odd angles it’s stayed connected.

    It’s worked well for me. I can’t see a problem for a paved boat launch or an off road boat launch.... boats have regular couplers.

    Maybe jump on YouTube and check out what the Aussies pull boats through with an LC or tractor to compare...

    Max coupler is surely better but a ball hitch is pretty capable in my experience. Also, with a 5x10, I would think that you will drag the trailer before the angle would be a problem.
     
  6. Dan Lee

    Dan Lee

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    Yes - I'm concerned about 5x8/5x10 utility trailers being too low to the ground to be useful off pavement. I some overland trailers that look perfect but when I checked pricing.....

    But good to know that ball is generally pretty capable.

    I may have to splurge here: something like the Malone or Yakima kayak trailer. And then maybe just keep a utility trailer for on pavement usages. 2x the price but not sure what other options there are.
     
  7. TeCKis300

    TeCKis300

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    Utility trailers are cake to lift. Either by lifting blocks, and/or larger tires. Should be easy to gain more clearance. You'll want to keep the trailer as level as possible, which ensures clearance at both tongue and tail. Have any pics to share?

    While I don't do any serious off road with my Airstream, I've likewise lifted it by ~3". Slightly larger tires, and 2 5/8" lifting blocks. I don't ever have to worry about dragging its tail again when boondocking, and now its clearance and posture are a much better fit for my LX.
     
  8. Dan Lee

    Dan Lee

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    Thanks. If easy and cheap, utility trailer may be back on the table.

    Would need to figure out where to take it and what level lift is safe.
     
  9. TeCKis300

    TeCKis300

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    Depending on the axles, it might not even cost you anything. Do you have a pic of it?

    A common mod for spring leaf based trailers, is to flip the axles from over to under the springs:
    [​IMG]

    If it's already under, you can readily source some lift blocks and extended U-bolts.

    etrailer.com is a good resource. Something like this - Are There Lift Kits Available for Trailers | etrailer.com
     
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  10. Dan Lee

    Dan Lee

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    Thanks much!! I’ll look into this.