You know whats weird?

phishtaco

Cincinnati
 
 
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Is that car drivers in OH must wear there seatbelts, but motorcylce riders are not required to wear helmets. Just doesn't seem right.

Last night a cop clock a guy doing 130mph on his motorcylce, he ran into a car and is now in the hospital in OK condition.
 
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phishtaco said:
Is that car drivers in OH must wear there seatbelts, but motorcylce riders are not required to wear helmets. Just doesn't seem right.

Last night a cop clock a guy doing 130mph on his motorcylce, he ran into a car and is now in the hospital in OK condition.

No helmet required in Illinois and Wisconsin, either. I live and Illinois and am walking distance (a stones throw, literally) from Wisconsin, and we see it all the time here.


And that's the way it ought to be. I think driving aroubnd in a car without a seatbelt is an incredibly stupid thing to do-- the lasws of physics dictate this. However, I think you have the right to be stupid, and should be able to make the determination for yourself.


Steve
 
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that's stupid. seatbelts in cars but no helmet on bikes

in australia you don't need car insurance legally

although part of your registration cost is insurance to cover injury to others in an accident
 

Jman

 
 
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bad_religion_au said:
that's stupid. seatbelts in cars but no helmet on bikes

in australia you don't need car insurance legally

although part of your registration cost is insurance to cover injury to others in an accident
That last part is really what car insurace is for--liability.
 
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"Helmet laws suck" as do all other laws that infringe on people's liberty. I am not advocating driving around without seatbelts or helmets, but the gubment needs to get the hell out. Bathtubs kill lots of babies - when are they going to outlaw bathtubs? Ah well, there is little hope - the US is going to hell and it is trying to "save" its citizens from themselves while doing it.
 

Jman

 
 
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States should compel younger/newer riders to wear them, until they "graduate" to helmet-free status; even then, states should make a rough calculation as to how much $$$ having helmet-less riders costs the population and assess a "helmet-free license" fee to cover any costs. Who knows, maybe the lack of life-saving measures needed, plus the extra savings of having donor organs in greater supply, would result in the license being free.
 
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jeez you guys get it easy if you can whinge about seatbelt laws etc.

i for one agree with seatbelt and helmet laws. not for saving lives, but for limiting serious injuries.

dead people (this may sound harsh) don't matter... but if 1/3 your society is disabled, that society won't cope under the strain of supporting them/ loss of productivity.

riding a bike or driving a car is a privelege, not a human right. to get priveleges, you have to accept the responsibilities of undertaking that activity. same as if you go wheeling, you should stick to the trails, keep them clean, and do it safetly/ non destructively.

sheesh you guys'd go well in australia. 3/4 of the modifications on this board aren't allowed on the roads. extended shackles, altered wheelbase, tires bigger than 1 inch over standard, or 2 inches wider than standardk lifts over 2 inches, spring overs, engine conversions, welded steering components, front bumpers that have pertrusions, spring reversals, alterations to spring rates... we lose about 10% of our tracks every year to the greenies locking up our "bush"

heck every television channel in australia runs a "infotainment" news type show, and every second week they go on about how dangerous 4x4's are. Political parties are pushing to ban 4x4's in australia, or make stringent licencing requirements. not just that but there are laws implemented to ban "bullbars" or scrub bars or whatever you call them in the US.

look at the distance and terrain in australia, and the kangaroos and other wildlife, the quality of our roads, and the extent of our country driving... and they still wanna ban 4x4's... a woman recently reversed over a kid in the school carpark, and she was aquitted of wrong doing, as the corronor blamed the nissan patrol she was driving. not her lack of skills, not the kid's stupidity, not the kid's father for failing to supervise her (he was there) but the poor visability due to the 4x4 design.

not just that... requiring licences to surf, banning dog breeds, and a number of other things... makes me angry... but i understand the seatbelt and helmet laws
 

Tapage

Club 4X4 Panamá
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bad_religion_au said:
that's stupid. seatbelts in cars but no helmet on bikes

in australia you don't need car insurance legally

although part of your registration cost is insurance to cover injury to others in an accident

wouuu .. ! I'm impresend, but I think, maybe in Australia, the registration are very very xpensive.. !
 
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bad_religion_au said:
jeez you guys get it easy if you can whinge about seatbelt laws etc.

...riding a bike or driving a car is a privelege, not a human right. to get priveleges, you have to accept the responsibilities of undertaking that activity.

...sheesh you guys'd go well in australia. 3/4 of the modifications on this board aren't allowed on the roads...we lose about 10% of our tracks every year to the greenies locking up our "bush"

...Political parties are pushing to ban 4x4's in australia, or make stringent licencing requirements. not just that but there are laws implemented to ban "bullbars" or scrub bars or whatever you call them in the US.

...not just that... requiring licences to surf, banning dog breeds, and a number of other things... makes me angry... but i understand the seatbelt and helmet laws
We are facing all of the same problems here in the US as you are down under. The difference may be in the response from our politicians and citizens. We are starting to have a strong response from recreation users, who increase in numbers every year.

While certainly we have lost more fights for public land use than we have won, we are making headway now and organizing better. We also have a multi-billion dollar industry which produces aftermarket auto parts who are fighting against any restrictions against car modifications.

Not sure how it works down under but tons of the land in the US is PUBLIC land - managed by the Federal and State Governments and held in trust for the use of the people. This is the nature of the fight for land here, how to use it, and by whom.

And in the US, there is a long tradition of Uncle Sam leaving us the hell alone, and lots of us still subscribe to this concept. The Republican Party used to believe in this concept but these new Republicans like Bush are in our business more and more.

You see, the Federal Government used to defer to the states to decide much of our business, and now they seem to legislate everything:rolleyes:

And in the US, people view driving their cars as a privelage, which is why we went to war to secure more oil. It all makes perfect sense:flipoff2:
 
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tonkota said:
Repeal seat belt laws, but when the moron gets injured - NO STATE OR FEDERAL SUPPORT!! Nothing.

But that would require personal responsibility - and we all know how wide spread that is :rolleyes:

The GubMnt's #1 job is to protect us from ourselves

:flipoff2: the GubMnt
:flipoff2: the idiots
:flipoff2: em all

(all the above have the :D removed)
 

Jman

 
 
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More news from the Great State of Ohio! :rolleyes:

_________________________________

Ohio Judge Orders Access to Rare Coins
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Published: May 26, 2005
Filed at 4:32 p.m. ET

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) -- A judge on Thursday ordered a coin dealer to give auditors immediate access to a collection of rare coins he purchased on behalf of the state.

The dealer, Tom Noe, was given until early Thursday afternoon to produce a list of the state's holdings, which include coins and other collectibles.

The Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation began investing in rare coins in the late 1990s as a way to hedge its investments in stocks and bonds. The $50 million investment, which Noe was charged with running, came under investigation after 121 coins worth an estimated $400,000 disappeared and Democrats alleged that Noe was awarded the state's business in return for campaign contributions to Republicans.

The state sued Tuesday to take over the collection and the bureau wants its auditors to inventory the coins, which are stored in five states. But auditors have been prevented from examining one of the largest two caches of rare coins, held by Noe at his business in a Toledo suburb, officials said.

The workers' compensation fund does not know what coins or collectibles the fund owns or their value, spokesman Jeremy Jackson said.

Noe's attorney did not immediately return a message seeking comment Thursday. His attorney said earlier this week that he was cooperating with investigators.

Questions about the investment surfaced in April when The Blade newspaper of Toledo found that two 1800s-era gold coins had disappeared. Noe said they were sent to a Colorado coin dealer but got lost in the mail in 2003.

The newspaper then reported that 119 other coins were missing. Noe said he thought the coins had been stolen by the Colorado dealer, whom he hired to assist with the fund. Colorado authorities are investigating.

The state responded by announcing plans to sell off its coin collection. Noe has been prohibited from buying or selling any coins from the fund under a court order except to complete sales already paid for.

The coin fund represents less than 1 percent of the bureau's total $14 billion in investments.
 
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