Winch cable preservation (1 Viewer)

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Would it be beneficial to spray a little WD-40, Liquid Wrench or other directly on the steel wire cable on the winch to provide a little protection from the elements?
 

e9999

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I remember reading someplace something about how wire rope comes prelubed from the factory. Maybe even some wax.
Can't see any bad drawback to the idea. Except maybe getting stuff in the motor and getting dirt to stick to things?

But if you want protection from rain etc, WD40 and LW seem like poor choices.
 
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I would stay away from WD40 as it is going to attract dirt. I use silicone spray and/or Kroil as it is a bit cleaner and wicks in between the strands of wire and doesn't attract near as much dirt. Repels water well and prevents rust well.
 
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From this article on Pirate:

Wire Rope Lubrication

The lubrication ropes receive during manufacture is adequate only for initial storage and the early stages of the rope’s service life. A winch's wire rope should be maintained in a well-lubricated condition. It is important that lubricant be applied as part of the maintenance program. The lubricant must be compatible with the original lubricant, so the rope manufacturer should be consulted. The lubricant applied should be of the type that does not hinder visual inspection. The surface of some ropes may become covered with dirt, rock dust or other material during their operation. This can prevent field-applied lubricants from properly penetrating into the rope, so it's a good practice to clean these ropes before you lubricate them.
The lubricant you apply should be light-bodied enough to penetrate to the rope's core. You can normally apply lubricant by using one of three methods: drip it on rope, spray it on or brush it on. In all cases, you should apply it at a place where the rope is bending, such as around a sheave. We recommend you apply it at the top of the bend because that's where the rope's strands are spread by bending and are more easily penetrated.
In addition, pressure lubricators are available commercially. Your rope's service life will be directly proportional to the effectiveness of the method you use and the amount of lubricant that reaches the rope's working parts. A proper lubricant must reduce friction, protect against corrosion and adhere to every wire. It should also be pliable, and not crack or separate when cold, yet not drip when warm. Never apply heavy grease to the rope because it can trap excessive grit, which can damage the rope. Nor should you apply used "engine oil" because it contains materials that can damage the rope.


-B-
 
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That's right off the WARN sight I believe. I have seen it in the owners manual.

Wire Rope Lubrication

The lubrication ropes receive during manufacture is adequate only for initial storage and the early stages of the rope’s service life. A winch's wire rope should be maintained in a well-lubricated condition. It is important that lubricant be applied as part of the maintenance program. The lubricant must be compatible with the original lubricant, so the rope manufacturer should be consulted. The lubricant applied should be of the type that does not hinder visual inspection. The surface of some ropes may become covered with dirt, rock dust or other material during their operation. This can prevent field-applied lubricants from properly penetrating into the rope, so it's a good practice to clean these ropes before you lubricate them.
The lubricant you apply should be light-bodied enough to penetrate to the rope's core. You can normally apply lubricant by using one of three methods: drip it on rope, spray it on or brush it on. In all cases, you should apply it at a place where the rope is bending, such as around a sheave. We recommend you apply it at the top of the bend because that's where the rope's strands are spread by bending and are more easily penetrated.
In addition, pressure lubricators are available commercially. Your rope's service life will be directly proportional to the effectiveness of the method you use and the amount of lubricant that reaches the rope's working parts. A proper lubricant must reduce friction, protect against corrosion and adhere to every wire. It should also be pliable, and not crack or separate when cold, yet not drip when warm. Never apply heavy grease to the rope because it can trap excessive grit, which can damage the rope. Nor should you apply used "engine oil" because it contains materials that can damage the rope.


-B-[/QUOTE]
 

Mace

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get some winch rope instead of wire rope..
 

alia176

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I use a cable/chain lube found in most hardware stores. It's light and works out well. Also, another thing you can do is to have a cover made for your winch/solenoid box combo. This will protect the fairlead and the winch from road salt and grime. Many upholstery shop will make one for you using snaps/bungee/etc and a durable weatherproof material. It's worth the $100 investment for a $1000 expense.

Ali
 
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photogod said:
I would stay away from WD40 as it is going to attract dirt. I use silicone spray and/or Kroil as it is a bit cleaner and wicks in between the strands of wire and doesn't attract near as much dirt. Repels water well and prevents rust well.
I would tend to agree with this thinking. Maybe something like Ice wax for mountain bike chains, or that T-9 silicone spray.
 
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Thanks everyone,
I had a feeling that WD-40 wasn’t the best choice, I knew you guys would have some good input prior to spraying on the wrong thing.
:cheers:
 

Cruiserdrew

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I've never sprayed anything on the winch cable, but Boeshield is made for lubing of aircraft control cables. It's also great on bike chains and does not attract dirt. I believe it dries in place and leaves a waxy film on the cable-might be just the stuff. I like the idea of a protective cover as well.
 

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