wheel bearings

Joined
Nov 9, 2004
Messages
590
Location
Kent England
Is it best to get wheel bearings from Toyota or after market ones ok to use? and does anyone know the Toyota part numbers for the front wheel bearings and the thick backing washer, I have the tab washers so thats not a problem, anything else that I will need?
 
Joined
Apr 29, 2003
Messages
1,476
Location
Texas
 
 
 
Koyo or Timken are the most used here and I believe they both have Toyota Part #'s...the part numbers are listed under numerous "birfield" threads just do a search. The "thick backing washer" is called the race and is included with the bearings.

Not sure what you are calling "tab washers" but to replace the wheel bearings you might as well replace all the seals including the inner axle seal - aka birf job.

Just another note- there are wheel bearings and there are trunion bearings I replaced both with my brif job just to be on the safe side but if there is no sign of wear many leave them alone.

A little searching will reveal a lot of information about this process...good luck - post back if you have any more questions.
 

landtank

SILVER Star
Joined
Mar 27, 2003
Messages
19,834
Location
Groveland MA
 
 
 
I don't think the thick backing washer you are refering to is the race. It's the one with the small tab that positions it on the spindle that the locking nut rest against, right? That washer is gotten from the dealler alomg with the locking (tab) washer. Generally everyone sticks with Timken or Koyo and sourced from a local shop will save you some money.
 

flintknapper

SILVER Star
Joined
May 22, 2004
Messages
7,975
Location
Deep East Texas
 
 
 
Either.

As others have said, Timkens are fine and can be bought locally. I believe the "Koyo's" are better quality (if you really want the best). Koyo's are more expensive, but not prohibitively so.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Nov 9, 2004
Messages
590
Location
Kent England
bearings

yes land tank, your correct on all you mentioned, I do somtimes wonder if you Americans call things a different name and was unsure if you knew what I was on about, I will probably get all the items from Toyota, I did a birf job about 8 months ago, I didnt change any of the bearings as they all looked perfect, but last week I noticed wheel play on the front right side, when I looked at the thick washer, it now has quite a deep wear grove where the innner of the bearing has spun against it, perhaps the inner of the bearing is worn and allowing to spin on the shaft, or perhaps I didnt have the correct pre load in the bearings.
 

Cruiserdrew

On the way there
SILVER Star
Joined
Mar 15, 2003
Messages
15,889
Location
Sacramento, CA
 
 
 
Snow-that grove is pretty universal, I just flip my washer over and replace every other time. It sounds like you are just out of adjustment. Before you buy bearings, just reset the preload and see if that doesn't solve the problem.

I've used Timkins and Koyos-Toyota has both as OEM, and infact the Timkins were the factory bearing on the 95-97 80 series, at least in the USA. The best source in the US for wheel bearings is AutoZone (which otherwize sucks) but a full set of bearings is about $35 per axle for Timkins. In Norway-it's likely Toyota. Good luck!
 
Joined
Sep 4, 2005
Messages
77
Location
Denver
Robbie came out and did my PHH the other day and pointed out that my front wheel bearings were lose after doing my Birf job a few weeks before. I was able to just reset the preload and its feeling normal now.

I might have had 350 miles on like that and the bearings were still in great shape.
 
Joined
May 7, 2005
Messages
2,352
Location
South Jordan, UT
 
 
 
Koyo vs. Timken

I've read recommendations for both on this forum. Anyone have any actual info on "which one is better?"

Just wondering. I put Timkens on my front end.

Hayes
 

landtank

SILVER Star
Joined
Mar 27, 2003
Messages
19,834
Location
Groveland MA
 
 
 
It's been becoming more and more common for people to notice that the wheel bearings are loosening over time. I personally don't follow the preload proceedure that Toyota suggests but just torque them to 10ftlbs. It was this loosening that brought me to this. If you decide to continue following the proceedure then check those bearings often.
 

tucker74

Moderator
Joined
May 12, 2003
Messages
4,621
Location
Austin, TX
 
 
 
I didn't notice any significant differences in the Koyo & Timken and have done birf jobs with both. You can buy the same Timken that come out of the Toyota box at AutoZone for 1/3 the price ...

Tucker

BTW: Japan is not known for high quality bearings - this is from a friend of mine that distributes bearings for a living.
 

flintknapper

SILVER Star
Joined
May 22, 2004
Messages
7,975
Location
Deep East Texas
 
 
 
tucker74 said:
I didn't notice any significant differences in the Koyo & Timken and have done birf jobs with both. You can buy the same Timken that come out of the Toyota box at AutoZone for 1/3 the price ...

Tucker

BTW: Japan is not known for high quality bearings - this is from a friend of mine that distributes bearings for a living.



I can't get the link to work, but if you search PIRATE for (Timken vs. Koyo) you'll get some varied opinions there as well.

Like you... I have used both on various vehicles in different applications. Most people don't own a vehicle long enough to say whether one is superior to another.

I have an Early Bronco that I've owned and wheeled hard for about 20 years. I've been through lots of bearings...and my vote goes for the Koyo's.

Regardless of what you choose (Timken/Koyo) make certain you pack them properly, adjust preload correctly, and check them after 5,000 miles or so if you have installed new ones.
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2003
Messages
1,186
Location
Kansas City, MO
 
 
 
Some have said the Koyos have tighter tolerances, others have said that they may even have an additional roller or two over the Timkens.

But I pulled Timkens off my '95 that were there from the factory, and I put Timkens back on.

They seamt fine to me; the two new ones I put on had the exact same part number engraved in them as the ones I took off. The other two OEM bearings on the front axle were fine.
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2003
Messages
1,186
Location
Kansas City, MO
 
 
 
Let me add that the two that went bad were at around 85 - 90K miles, and they were only "bad" in the strict "this roller kinda looks like it has a mark on it, and since I'm in here doing a birf job anyway I'll replace them with the new ones I picked up just in case" perfectionist sense.
 
Joined
Nov 9, 2004
Messages
590
Location
Kent England
torque setting

The tube spanner I have to tighten up the preload nut and lock nut has a bar that goes through two holes drilled in the tube, I think I will have to make a tube spanner that is blank at one end with a 12mm nut welded on the end, so I can put a torque wrench on it to preload the bearings to 10 lb ft
 

landtank

SILVER Star
Joined
Mar 27, 2003
Messages
19,834
Location
Groveland MA
 
 
 
snowwolf said:
The tube spanner I have to tighten up the preload nut and lock nut has a bar that goes through two holes drilled in the tube, I think I will have to make a tube spanner that is blank at one end with a 12mm nut welded on the end, so I can put a torque wrench on it to preload the bearings to 10 lb ft

I've been using the torque method for 100s of thousands of miles without a problem. Just be sure to rotate the rotor several times back and forth and then recheck the torque. The first few times the torque will drop quite a bit because you are purging some grease out of the bearing.
 

flintknapper

SILVER Star
Joined
May 22, 2004
Messages
7,975
Location
Deep East Texas
 
 
 
shocker said:
Let me add that the two that went bad were at around 85 - 90K miles, and they were only "bad" in the strict "this roller kinda looks like it has a mark on it, and since I'm in here doing a birf job anyway I'll replace them with the new ones I picked up just in case" perfectionist sense.

I do the same thing, if a bearing is "suspect" at all...I just replace it (and the race). Its an inexpensive way to ensure my day doesn't go bad.

Remember, all of the weight/forces of the vehicle ride on basically two things: Wheel bearings and tires. Make sure you have good ones!
 
Joined
Nov 9, 2004
Messages
590
Location
Kent England
I think I will change the bearings anyway, because all whats rubbed off the washer (iron fragments) must now be in the bearings and grease?
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top Bottom