Welding

PKP80

 
 
Joined
Nov 16, 2004
Messages
2,731
Location
Los Angeles, CA
I know you can take a class to learn to weld, but I don't have the time for that kind of commitment unfortunately do to work and school.

Anyone in the LA area interested in teaching a 23 year old how to weld properly (tig/mig)? Just a day or two's worth of learning....I pick things of this sort up very quickly if I may say so myself. I'll buy the beer :beer:

Just thought I'd ask.

-Sam-
 

flintknapper

SILVER Star
 
 
Joined
May 22, 2004
Messages
6,903
Location
Deep East Texas
If you learn that fast...then NASA needs you!

Not trying to discourage you but you won't "pick up" MIG & TIG in two days.

You couldn't READ all you need to know in two days let alone start welding.

Someone can show you the basics, you can get some literature on the subject, but a considerable amount of practice is required to make "good" welds and IMOP it is a "perishable" skill as well.

If you're truly interested....learn to "stick" weld first AC & DC, then take up MIG, then TIG.

Don't get in a rush....and good luck, its a great skill to have.
 

tonkota

 
Joined
Sep 28, 2004
Messages
2,125
Location
Spokane, WA
Yes, learn to stick weld with an inexpensive buzz box. Grab a Hobart or Lincoln book. My favorite is "Design of Weldments" and it was only $10 new. Great book for numerous reasons...
 
Joined
Dec 2, 2003
Messages
3,397
Location
Rockville, MD
Hate to be discouraging, but I have to agree w/ flint.

Sticking two pieces of metal together can be learned in 10 minutes. Truely learning to weld well can take years...

Ary
 

MaddBaggins

Remember the KnightRider!
 
Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Messages
3,547
Location
The Old Pueblo
I first learned how to weld with good old oxy/acetylene and stick welding. Also did a little brazing and a lot of electronics soldering. You can get a gas set up for cheap and then learn the art of the "good-looking" weld. If you don't wanna mess with gas , a wire feed isn't to expensive. There is a lot to learn b4 you just go for it though.
You could get some books and a wire-feed, buy some scrap steel and practice. I wouldn't try to learn on anything like a new bumper or sliders. A class would be best if you could squeeze the time. I think a lot of junior colleges will have a class you could take. I could be wrong, I learned in high school in '85. Good luck, it is a skill well worth having. :cheers:
 

CruisinGA

 
 
Joined
Mar 27, 2003
Messages
6,199
Location
Georgia Tech
A good buddy picked up a quality MIG welder a week ago, after a few days of piddling around, he is building structurally sound stuff. (welds aren't pretty but they are holding well).

MIG is crazy easy, read, buy a welder, practice.

I am no expert or even a good welder, but I was amazed at how easy it was to start laying satisfactory beads using a good machine with gas and quality wire, with almost zero prior experience.
 
Joined
Nov 16, 2003
Messages
6,045
Location
Dixie co. Florida
flintknapper said:
If you're truly interested....learn to "stick" weld first AC & DC, then take up MIG, then TIG.

I know that is the progression a lot of people go through especially professionals but I am not really interested in stick welding so is it truly necessary? For a home hobbyist couldn’t you lean one method from scratch? Maybe it would take longer but if you want to mig why not buy a mig and start practicing with it?

I did some gas and stick welding in college, only a week or so IIRC and mostly class room, results were ugly at best.

I am going to need a welder, been debating back and forth between Mig and Tig, like the versatility of Tig (different metal type, thickness etc) but it is harder to lean and slower than Mig. Not sure how much the speed thing would bug me on a puts around the garage type tool. But either way I have done neither and will be starting from scratch.
 
Joined
Dec 2, 2003
Messages
3,397
Location
Rockville, MD
If you can stick weld decently everything else will most likely seem pretty easy. Sure you can learn how to MIG and not learn anything else and be just fine. However if you want to learn to TIG, I really suggest learning to stick and Oxy/Act first. Once you gotten those two down, TIG is easy.

I started out on a wirefeed machine(no gas) and was doing ok. Then I took a class and learned Oxy/Act, Stick, MIG, and TIG, and finally purchased a stick machine(due to budget constraints). Now that I can stick weld proficiently, MIG is a freakin walk in the park, vertical, horizontal, whatever...

Ary
 

brian

SILVER Star
 
 
Joined
Feb 7, 2003
Messages
9,890
Location
lebanon,pa
welding is easy to do, yet not really easy to learn.
you'll need lots of rod&metal to burn through till you get the hang of it.
you would really be ahead taking the class.
learning to weld is more than just learning a new way to hold two pieces of metal togther. knowing how the machines work is a part of it. each meathod(mig,tig,stick.ec) works alittle different and each is suited to different things.
mig runs on DC reversed
tig runs on DC straight
tig for AL runs on AC
most stick runs on DC reversed.

i doubt you have any clue what that means, yet it is rather important.

there's alittle more to it than just melting metal.

mig while easy to do is just as easy to do wrong. with it is possible to lay a nice "looking" bead down, that has no strength what so ever, if the machine is not set propperly.

i'm sorry but you won't get EVERYTHING in two days.
this what i do for a living, 15yrs now. and i still learn new techinques and meathods from time to time.

i picked one up for 309ss stick rods, for out of postion last week.
 

Mr.Bryan

 
 
Joined
Mar 28, 2003
Messages
1,223
Location
Over here
Ok guys, I'm going to add a nice "back yard" flavor to this. Two days of welding is plenty of time to "learn how to weld" The nice thing about 4-wheeling is that it is very slow speed stuff. Had this been a forum for track racing and some guys says i cant weld and I want to weld a cage up, then ya, that's not such a good idea. If you weld up some sliders and your welds sucks, oops you break off the slider or crack a weld. No big deal... you don’t die. I think some people tend to get very picky over welds that are just fine. All though they may not be pretty, they will hold, and instead of holding to 15,000lb. tensile strength, it may only be 9000lbs, but whatever, live, learn, and if you break a weld, its good practice welding it back up again. I learned how to weld while welding my sliders and they're just fine. I ground down the boogers and painted them and I’ve wheeled with them a bunch of times and no problems. The general idea of welding is a cinch. If you want to lay perfect stacks of dimes with perfect penetration then it will take some time, but a great way to learn is to just jump into it.

Have fun :beer:
 

PKP80

 
 
Joined
Nov 16, 2004
Messages
2,731
Location
Los Angeles, CA
I knew I'd get a little flack for looking for a simple answer, but that's why I love this board. Tough love. I'm not about to buy a welder, I just want to see what it is like to weld. I will probably buy a book/go to the library to get a book on welding just to learn what the process is technically because that is something I'm interested in. Madbaggins recommended electrical soldering for experience, where by I've been doing that for a very long time being in car audio and electronics pre Landcruiser and am very proficient with that. Thanks for the help all.

Request still stands :flipoff2: , anyone local want to help me out let me know. Thanks in advance :cool:

-Sam-
 
Top Bottom