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Welding question

Discussion in 'Tools and Fabrication' started by buffethat@comcast.ne, Mar 6, 2007.

  1. buffethat@comcast.ne

    buffethat@comcast.ne

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    Not sure where to put this but since most people do their own welding here in this forum I thought it would be best suited here.

    Ok, I need some more info. I have a Hobart 140 welder, it is the 110v version that can be used with flux or gas. I will need to weld my suspension with it and some bumper parts. Most stuff is between 3/16 and 1/4" thick.

    Question is can I do it with the flux core only or do I need to change up and use Co2? I really don't want to buy a bottle and have it filled eventhough I do plan on getting one later for a refill set up.

    What is the consensus here???

    All you pro welders please chime in and don't tell me I should have bought a 220v I had no $$$ then.
     
  2. alkaline747trio

    alkaline747trio

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    IME, flux just doesnt do as good a job as gas. This is very limited experience, but I choose gas over flux at almost all cost.
     
  3. splitshot

    splitshot Head cook, Bottle washer, and Peace keeper. SILVER Star

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    Flux works best if you're working outside with any kind of a breeze. C02 or argon are going to get a cleaner result if there is no wind.


    I've got a Lincoln 110v and in my humble opinion, it's alittle lite for material over 1/8". Thats when I drag out my stick welder as I don't have a 240v wire feed.
     
  4. CruisinGA

    CruisinGA

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    there are a few advantages of flux core over gas shielded welding, but for pretty much all home use besides windy conditions, you'll be much better off with C25 mix gas and solid wire.

    Welding with C25 (75% argon 25% Co2) produces less splatter and a cleaner weld than straight Co2.

    You'll thank yourself.

    A friend of mine built his jeep with a Miller 135 (equiv to your welder) and it is not about to fall apart... Just recognize the limitations of your machine, weld slowly and make double passes if necessary.
     
  5. Stumpalama

    Stumpalama Forum Junkie SILVER Star

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    You'll be much happier with the results with gas. I am just an amateur welder aswell and I find gas to be much friendlier, easier and cleaner. I used flux core wire for my initial restoration and it left lots of spatter and required lots of grinding. When I got my MIG welder and started welding with gas it was like night and day. SOOOO much more fun and much much better results with gas.
    The 140 will work, just leave it on the highest power setting. I welde my metaltech cage and my sliders with my 110v Lincoln SP-135+.
    Good luck.
     
  6. brokenparts

    brokenparts

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    while its true you'll get cleaner welds with gas... you'll most likely get better penetration with the flux core wire with that welder.
     
  7. buffethat@comcast.ne

    buffethat@comcast.ne

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    Wow guys thanks for all the info. I do not need the flux in particular as I am welding in my garage, so no breeze there. I understand the reasoning behind it and I like the less spatter, got lots on my practice welds.

    I just called a welding supply place and they told me that a new 20# botlle for Co2 would run $87 plus $37 for a fill. I thought that was pretty high, need to call more. Now I see that you guys are saying to use Co2 or Co25, I know they are mixed gases and that argon if I am not mistaken is also used for alluminum. So what does the mix do for me? Does it really work that much better?

    Also how long can you guys weld on a 20# bottle? The guy wants to sell me a bigger one but I want to use the bottle for air ups too, might as well get a dual purpose out of it.

    I really appreciate all the info so far, learning everytime I get on this board. Thanks :cheers:

    PS keep the suggestions coming.
     
  8. fj40charles

    fj40charles

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    Flux core will give you the penetration with a 110v welder. Might want to consider straight CO2. Less splatter than flux core, but more penetration than Argon/CO2 mix.
     
  9. maximBJ70

    maximBJ70

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    I don't think that with a 110V welder you'll be able to get enough penetration with gas when going that thick. The 110's are great for sheet metal, but the big stuff scares them. Go with the flux and a steady hand
     
  10. Stumpalama

    Stumpalama Forum Junkie SILVER Star

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    Most welding supply companies like Air Liquide and BOC lease tanks and it's pretty reasonable. Around $60 for the tank per year and $70 for a fill that lasts about 6 months or so depending on your usage.
     
  11. buffethat@comcast.ne

    buffethat@comcast.ne

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    Thanks I will give them a call, is that for a house hold user or business? Last place would not lease/rent if it was not for business.
     
  12. Mace

    Mace rock scientist.. Staff Member s-Moderator

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    stick with flux core and weld slowly (lots of heat)..

    Use antisplatter and cleanup will be a breeze..
     
  13. Arya Ebrahimi

    Arya Ebrahimi

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    I'll add to the use flux and anti-spatter.

    I built a few things for my old truck with a 110V welder, and it all held for the most part(first time welding ever). Prep is going to be key for you. With a small welder like that, you should really bevel 1/4" and probably even 3/16" to get proper penetration. hell, I bevel 1/4" when I'm welding w/ my 220V stick, it's just the right thing to do for a proper weld. Make sure your metal is very clean too. Cleanliness and prep are they keys to succesful welding with a 110V welder.

    Ary
     
  14. buffethat@comcast.ne

    buffethat@comcast.ne

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    Thanks for the reminder, I am about to weld some .120 HREW to the stock rear roll bar in my 4runner, the rollbar is pretty thin. I will bevel it pretty good so I can lay a nice bead hopefully and get good penetration.

    I have sanded/grinded everything to bear metal so it is nice and clean. Do I put the anti spatter on the weld too or just around it?
     
  15. photogod

    photogod

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    Think about your wire size as well. Thick material, thicker wire, 030/035. Your duty cycle will be pretty low with full power and 1/4". You may have to make two passes to get the penitration on 1/4".

    You might want to go thiner wire with the thiner tube. 023-025 and turn the power down pretty low so as not to burn through the sides of the tube.

    Gas gets nicer welds with less splatter, CO2/ Argon, with less pennitration. Flux core gives better depth to the weld but a bit more messy.
     
  16. Jakes40

    Jakes40 IH8MUD Poser

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    IMOP If you don't start with shielding gas then you will do fine with flux core. You can also weld thicker material with flux core. Can’t remember what the particulars are but flux core welds thicker material in a single pass then solid wire.

    2x PHOTOGOD
    I use .30 for everything I weld but I have not welded anything smaller than 14 gauge.

    I don't like flux core wire!
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2007
  17. Marko

    Marko

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    75/25 is the ideal gas to run with a Mig, mild steel, clean low spatter.

    Flux core, I personally only see it for use in the field with wind and packaging being a possible factor. It's nasty, but works.

    100% argon is for Alum welding with a mig and most all TIG welgding, steel and alum. There are other possible mixes but the uses for them are a not worth going over for use in a basic fab or machine shop.

    I run all the MIGs with .030 general every day use with 75/25. We do use some .035 but only occassionally. My TIGS run 100% Ar and our spool guns (alum). I don't use any 100% CO2 on any of the welders. If you're mig welding a lot of SS then you'll use a Tri-MIX, but not for small repairs or builds.

    With the 110v you will be limited to penetration with over .120-134ish. I know what the inside panel reads. Prep right, clean, clean, clean, bevel, double passes and take your time make the puddles, flow properly.

    If you have a torch, pre-heat, and let it cool on it's own.
     
  18. buffethat@comcast.ne

    buffethat@comcast.ne

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    Well................after reading all the posts and talking to some of my wheeling budies I decided to get the Hobart 187. I was able to return the 140 and pay the difference plus had to buy a 25 foot extension cord to go from the dryer to the garage.

    Still not sure if I will go the gas route right now, money is partly the isseu. The cheapets I found a bottle filled was $110, that is a nice piece of steel for the bumpers:)

    Now comes the fun part of learning a new machine, it should not be to bad but it is still different. All of the welding I have done so far has been with the .30 flux wire. I have a roll of.35 that I was thinking about using for some of the 1/4" long runs and 5/16" plates I need to mount.

    I really appreciate all the info from all of you, hopefully once I get better I can repay my debt to another rookie welder. As for now, I am happy to have a machine that can handle the workload, and in the future I will try the gas mix and see how that works for me.

    Thanks again to all :cheers:
     
  19. Cruiserdrew

    Cruiserdrew SILVER Star

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    I didn't see too much difference between .30 and .35 wire. Overall, I prefer the .30. Both make good welds, but the .30 seemed easier to control for me as a rookie welder. I have a roll of flux core for using in my driveway if needed, but so far, I've never used it. The Radnor (Airgas) .30 wire gets it done.
     
  20. fj40charles

    fj40charles

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    I think the .030 wire may be better for beginners. The weld will not bead up as fast giving you more time to stay in one area and watch the puddle.

    Good decision to go with a 220v welder.. You'll never regret that decision.