Weld options when not at home (1 Viewer)

woytovich

I'm fake news
SILVER Star
Joined
Sep 2, 2003
Messages
12,504
Location
Metro NY
 
 
 
I'd like to build this into a comprehensive list of the options for welding when NOT at home or in the shop. Something that can be used when on a wheeling trip. For ME that could mean on the trail OR back at a motel or campground.

The options as I see them:

-------------------------------------------------------------

1. Onboard welder, alternator powered (Link-Arc, Premier Power Welder etc)
---Probably the BEST for those that WILL be using this on some regular basis.
---Adds high output alternator to the vehicle
---Adds access to DC power for grinder etc.
---Requires vehicle to be running
---$$

Premier Power Welder high-frequency on board welders, high-amp alternators, charging systems, Ready Welder, trail, off-road
Homebrew versions:
Pirate4x4.Com - Pirates of the Rubicon 4wd Club
Onboard welder w/140A alternator
Jon's Place/Jeep Page

-------------------------------------------------------------

2. Vehicle battery powered Ready Welder or GO WELD
---A bit more set-up to get ready to weld than #1
---Cheaper than #1
---Requires access to 2 good batteries
---$$

Readywelder.com | There's nothing like it!
GoWeld - Go Anywhere, Weld Anywhere

-------------------------------------------------------------

3. Vehicle battery powered w/homebrew cables and weld stick
---A bit more set-up to get ready to weld than #2
---Cheaper than #2
---Harder for most to get a "nice" weld
---Requires access to 2 good batteries
---$

Minute Mod: Trail Welder - ORN
YouTube - Using 3 car batteries to weld (Video #1)

-------------------------------------------------------------

4. Small 120v buzz box or MIG (easily transportable)
---Provides a "real" welding experience
---None of the set-up required of #1, #2 or #3
---Need access to an AC outlet (NOT a 12v>120v inverter)
---Not a trail tool.
---$-$$$

HF 80 Amp Inverter Arc Welder
Miller Passport

-------------------------------------------------------------

5. Oxygen/Acetelyne welding set-up
---Somewhat dangerous to transport
---None of the set-up required of #1, #2 or #3
---Finite supply of gas
---few people know how to gas weld
---$

-------------------------------------------------------------

6. Self-contained battery powered, portable units
---Very portable
---Some run on 115v or even 230v AC in addition to battery
---None of the set-up required of #1, #2 or #3
---Finite supply of power
---$$$

Century battery operated welder
pirate4x4.com lisitng
Hobart Trek 180
Miller Passport vs Hobart Trek 180 Mig Welder Review

-------------------------------------------------------------

7. Gas powered welder/generator
---"Real" welding experience
---None of the set-up required of #1, #2 or #3
---Large and heavy (even small ones)
---Added functionality of having a generator
---$$$ - $$$$$

Powerland 100 AMP Welder and Gas Generator
Miller welder/generators
Hobart welder/generators

-------------------------------------------------------------

8. Gas powered generator + a small 110v welder
(match the generator output to the welders needs)
---versatile solution
---heavy, large, 2 units to deal with/set-up
---$$ +

-------------------------------------------------------------

GENERAL WELDING INFO:
Go Welding.Org – Learn to Weld –Stick, TIG, MIG, FCAW, Welding Certifications, Jobs and Safety.
 
Last edited:

KLF

Frame waxer
SILVER Star
Joined
Apr 5, 2003
Messages
8,826
Location
Southern NH
 
 
 
I vote #3. You'd be surprised how well you can weld with a couple of batteries, some jumper cables, and coat hanger wire.
 
Joined
Feb 6, 2002
Messages
15,139
Location
OC, CA
 
 
 
 
It all depends on how much welding you need to do. If it is just emergency welding on the trail, then #3 works great as long as you carry some 6010 or 7018 rods.
#1 is not a bad option if you can find a place to mount a second alternator to use just for welding. The problem with alternator welders is not the power they can put out, it is the power that you can drive the alternator with a single V belt. Even if you get an expensive 200A alternator, it isn't going to put out that much power with a single V belt drive because it will slip or break first. For emergency welding and running electric power tools that have brushes, a large case, externally regulated FORD alternator will weld fine and you can get them in the junk yard for $20.
 
Joined
Oct 24, 2009
Messages
786
Spend your extra time learning to weld properly and buy a good machine and you wont have to worry about welding on the trail.

I have built ALLOT of 4x4 for myslef and others and have NEVER had to weld anything up on a rig I built.

I have burned things together for others with ready welders they bought and didnt know how to use (mostly cherocars). But never on a well built rig.

Welded things should not be falling off if welded on properly the first time.

Just my .02cents.
 

woytovich

I'm fake news
SILVER Star
Joined
Sep 2, 2003
Messages
12,504
Location
Metro NY
 
 
 
Spend your extra time learning to weld properly and buy a good machine and you wont have to worry about welding on the trail.
<snip>
Welded things should not be falling off if welded on properly the first time.
You are missing the point... It's not a matter of the welds breaking it's a matter of breaking something while wheeling... a cracked frame, a driveshaft, a steering arm... repairs to a part that are good enough to get off the trail or to a place where a proper repair or replacement can be made.
 

woytovich

I'm fake news
SILVER Star
Joined
Sep 2, 2003
Messages
12,504
Location
Metro NY
 
 
 
All: it is not a matter of picking the best choice here (while I do want to hear pros/cons). I wanted to lay out the options available. It seems to me that each is the right choice for some set of circumstances.

For example, if you are alone and only run one battery, the battery welders that need 2 batteries would be useless..
 
Last edited:
Joined
Oct 24, 2009
Messages
786
For example, if you are alone and only run one battery, the battery welders that need 2 batteries would be useless..
If you are wheeling a rig that needs parts welded back on by yourself then you are a burden to rescue workers, yourself and your family.
 

woytovich

I'm fake news
SILVER Star
Joined
Sep 2, 2003
Messages
12,504
Location
Metro NY
 
 
 
If you are wheeling a rig that needs parts welded back on by yourself then you are a burden to rescue workers, yourself and your family.
Again, you miss the point. (yeesh)

This thread was NOT meant to be a chat about what is and is not advisable regarding your rig, my rig or where we take them and with whom. It was meant to create a list of the OPTIONS available IF/WHEN one would need to weld something away from home base. To discuss the pros and cons of the welding SOLUTIONS... NOT to discuss the ways to avoid the need for the welding.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Dec 7, 2002
Messages
3,089
Location
Texas
 
 
 
 
My option would be using a Ready Welder with Premier power welder. Not the cheapest option, but the option I would pick.

Premier power welder can still burn rods if needed as well as be a power supply for the Ready welder allowing you to have a wire feed welder.
 

woytovich

I'm fake news
SILVER Star
Joined
Sep 2, 2003
Messages
12,504
Location
Metro NY
 
 
 
My option would be using a Ready Welder with Premier power welder. Not the cheapest option, but the option I would pick.

Premier power welder can still burn rods if needed as well as be a power supply for the Ready welder allowing you to have a wire feed welder.
Certainly a complete solution BUT I think you'll be into the $1400-$1800 range... yikes!
 
Joined
Feb 19, 2004
Messages
3,361
Location
Pepperell MA
 
 
 
Years ago I broke a drag link on my Cruiser at Paragon in PA (I lived 300 miles away Boston). One of the guys on the trail had a portable flux cored wire welder that looked like a jumper pack. We sleeved the part with a HiLift handle and welded it back together. Worked just fine and saved my weekend. Drove the Cruiser with the welded steering component until I could get a new part in hand. Wish I could remember who made the welder...

Nick
 
Joined
Dec 7, 2002
Messages
3,089
Location
Texas
 
 
 
 
Years ago I broke a drag link on my Cruiser at Paragon in PA (I lived 300 miles away Boston). One of the guys on the trail had a portable flux cored wire welder that looked like a jumper pack. We sleeved the part with a HiLift handle and welded it back together. Worked just fine and saved my weekend. Drove the Cruiser with the welded steering component until I could get a new part in hand. Wish I could remember who made the welder...

Nick
Nick,

I've seen a Century battery operated welder in action some time ago. It was okay. Not great, but worked.

Here is a Hobart battery powered welder. Takes 110v input also.

Hobart Welders - Products - Battery-Powered Welders

Charles
 

Bogo

FOOF
Joined
Feb 15, 2008
Messages
1,847
Location
On the farm
 
 
If your second battery is really two batteries, you can then weld and not deplete your starting battery.
 

Bogo

FOOF
Joined
Feb 15, 2008
Messages
1,847
Location
On the farm
 
 
THREE batteries...is that what you are suggesting?
Yeah, you use smaller Amp hour batteries, but wire them in parallel. So instead of one 100 Amp hour battery you get two 50Amp hour batteries, then wire them in parallel. Of course if you have the space and weight carrying capacity you could just have two bigger ones. When it comes welding time, you have the two house batteries to use without touching the starting battery. As always, use a battery isolator if the house batteries are of a different type, capacity, or age as the starting battery.
 

Bogo

FOOF
Joined
Feb 15, 2008
Messages
1,847
Location
On the farm
 
 
Yeah, you use smaller Amp hour batteries, but wire them in parallel. So instead of one 100 Amp hour battery you get two 50Amp hour batteries, then wire them in parallel. Of course if you have the space and weight carrying capacity you could just have two bigger ones. When it comes welding time, you have the two house batteries to use without touching the starting battery. As always, use a battery isolator if the house batteries are of a different type, capacity, or age as the starting battery.
BTW, the extra two jumper wires needed for wiring the house batteries in parallel come in handy when stringing them in series for welding. I suggest stud type connections on the house batteries. That way the wire ends are universal. Just don't hook em up wrong.
 

woytovich

I'm fake news
SILVER Star
Joined
Sep 2, 2003
Messages
12,504
Location
Metro NY
 
 
 
Any other input on the options mentioned? Any options I missed in Post 1?
 
Joined
Feb 6, 2002
Messages
15,139
Location
OC, CA
 
 
 
 
If you had a lot of welding to do in the field, I would suggest option 7:
Haul a Miller Trail Blazer or a Lincoln SA-200

Then you could do some welding :D
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top Bottom