Transfer case gear oil loss at high speeds (1 Viewer)

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Could you verify that breather line is clear and work properly? Or just disconect it for a test. Oil expand when getting warm, if breather is block, pressure will raise, sure oil will pass the seal. Just an idea.
 

cruisermatt

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How is your t-case input sealed? You sure it isn’t coming from the adapter side?

it uses a stock style seal in the front T-case housing. I am pretty sure that is all fine, oil level in the doubler was correct and splitcase oil level was low the last time I check the levels.

Could you verify that breather line is clear and work properly? Or just disconect it for a test. Oil expand when getting warm, if breather is block, pressure will raise, sure oil will pass the seal. Just an idea.

I am pretty confident that the breather line is fine but since so many have suggested it I guess I will pull it off and blow air through it. I need to go through them and the axle line anyways and replace them all since they are getting old
 
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You could add a speedi sleeve to the output which would increase tension on the seal slightly and give a bit better sealing while you have it apart.
 

cruisermatt

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You could add a speedi sleeve to the output which would increase tension on the seal slightly and give a bit better sealing while you have it apart.

That's a good thought, I wasn't aware they were available for the output flanges.
 
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Ok, so it seems like the consensus is that is it's just me with this issue.

I guess I'll reseal the case and try again :meh:
I know you have gears and a lot of machining into the existing case.

Would a 80 series rear case handle those speeds/rpms better? When you first started running it that fast did you get misted with dino goo? Or was it a slow progression?

1. Trans case vent lines
2. Output RTV
3. Reseal whole case.
4. Lift earlier (your foot)
5. Come up with an adapter for a 80/100/200 series Tcase 😎
 

cruisermatt

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I know you have gears and a lot of machining into the existing case.

Would a 80 series rear case handle those speeds/rpms better? When you first started running it that fast did you get misted with dino goo? Or was it a slow progression?

1. Trans case vent lines
2. Output RTV
3. Reseal whole case.
4. Lift earlier (your foot)
5. Come up with an adapter for a 80/100/200 series Tcase 😎

It’s been pretty much ever since I did the V8 swap.
I actually still have stock t-case gears and am not really invested into the splitcase very much other then my doubler setup.
Yes I think an 80/100/200 t case would be a lot better. The bearings and case design are a lot better for road longevity. However I’d have to part-time it and make a new doubler setup or get an adapter to my NV4500
All in all a big project I don’t have time for. Good thought though.
 

GLTHFJ60

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Speedi-sleeves come in ID and OD dimensions, so you can get them for whatever size will fit the companion flange. Grooving in that flange was my first thought. There are lots of standard sizes:


Are you sure it's coming from the transfer case and not the rear axle, or the doubler, or transmission?

Maybe add a UV dye to the t-case fluid to verify that's where it's coming from.
 

Toyoland66

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I don't know if I would mess with a speedi sleeve if you have a grooved output flange, you can get a new flange for not a lot of $$.
 

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