Towing a 40 on the 80's bumper hitch (1 Viewer)

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So...similar to lowtides thread, I need to tow my 40 and remember all the stuff about taking off driveshafts and such. The buyer would like me to mount a tow bar, and pull it that way. I only have to travel about an hour, and wont be seeing all that much hi speed. I would be in no hurry either. I have a class five adapter to mount into the four holes on the rear bumper, but am wondering if the crossmember will handle that kind of weight. Thanks
 

e9999

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well, even though I've been espousing using the pintle hook mount for trailering, and I have looked at my crossmember and decided it's quite strong, this may be a bit more than I'd chance, especially if the towed vehicle does not have functional brakes.

But have another look at all the discussions of how people tow 7000 lbs (IIRC) in other countries with the same crossmember...

Then again, what if you lose the thing and it goes and kill somebody....?

Then again, if you do 20 mph you should be fine...

Did this help? :D
 

e9999

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skyshark186 said:
No not really. I would be suprised if no one has done it before. Technically its no more weight than pulling it on a trailer so would that be non advisable as well?
well, there are some states I think where you can't tow anything over some low lbs limit without trailer brakes. Don't know about flat towing though.
 
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Towing on a trailer and flat towing a truck are very different. On a trailer the tires are close to the center of the load, the trailer by it's self is unstable, so when the towing truck turns the trailer follows. A flat towed truck with it's tires at the corners is stable and has a much higher tendency to push the towing truck around, most noticeable at high speed when turning and braking at the same time the towed truck wants to push the rear of the towing truck around. Most get in trouble during high speed emergency evasive maneuvers, cut the wheel and stab the brakes to avoid hitting something and the towed truck doesn't get the message and pushes the rear of the towing truck around, jack knifing and turning everything into rubble in a second, not fun! That said it can and is done, just be very careful with the high speed stuff, I would not flat tow anything close to the max. trailer weight. The loose rule of thumb is, the towed truck should be much lighter and have a much shorter wheel base than the towing truck.

Behind a short wheelbase truck like an 80 it would be much safer on a trailer. :cheers:
 

e9999

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actually, just do it!
some of us have been arguing too long about this crossmember. Let's find out once and for all if it's strong enough! Just take pics of before and after, please... :D
 
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Don't know about North Platte, MN but here in NJ it's illegal to tow any vehicle without a towbar. Additionally, if it's over a certain weight (which a 40 would meet), you have to have brakes on it. So to tow a vehicle like a 40, you'd have to hood up a tow bar and also configure some slave brake system (the RV crowd use them all the time--I'm sure you've seen some humongous RV with an Explorer or some POS behind it). It's not a bad idea since you really have little control over that sucker behind you. An hour of towing is not insignificant.
 
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I know junk towed his 40 around/ over speeds of 80mph. If you have a flat tow bar, I would go for it. Turn some Bob Marley on and take it slow and steady.
 

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