Top 3 original items to replace for well-maintained & already-baselined Hundy between 200k-300k miles (1 Viewer)

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Hi all!

I have searched quite some threads on similar topics. Thanks for all the great information!
Hope to seek your advice from a slightly different angle :geek:. What are the top 3-5 *original* items to replace around 250k miles? These items would usually be marketed as lasting forever for Non-Toyota cars because most cars won't last beyond 250k miles. But as we plan to drive our Hundys for 1 million miles :steer:, will inevitably need to replace at some point.

I have been owning a very well maintained 2007 LC for months. The previous (original) owner kept all the regular items per maintenance schedule at Toyota dealer. It runs super smooth. Mechanic check went well. After purchase, I baselined the usual items per suggestions here including: Heater-T, timing belt + all related items, all hoses, all filters, new radiator, CV axles, all fluid flushed, AHC also fluid flushed and pressure checked, new tires+alignment, spark plugs.

With these updated, I started my trip very confidently :steer:. But unfortunately after a few thousand miles at 250k, got stranded because the original alternator went bad 😂 . So it came to mind that there are original items likely to fail between 200k-250k even for well maintained and baselined Hundys (which means all the items due at 100k are replaced twice), but won't be an issue for non-Toyotas that won't even last 250k miles. I do hope to get a few replaced, preventatively, so I can drive long road trips without concern. Besides alternator, other threads suggested brake booster, starter etc. But these can get pretty expensive. So hope to prioritize if that's possible.

Thanks!
 

JunkCrzr89

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1) Every coolant hose that exists. Rad hoses, front and rear heater hoses, oil cooler hoses, etc.
2) Cv axles and drive/hub flanges
3) fuel pump and fuel filter

Heat kills 2uz engines, so don’t chance any leaks by doing #1. Worn outboard shaft splines and splines inside hub flanges stop a lot of people in their tracks, so keep the truck moving by doing #2. It’s astonishing to me how many original fuel filters and fuel pumps people are running at 200k+ miles, which seem to fail at the most importune time; so do #3 to keep the engine running. There is of course a caveat here and that is save money for the eventual failure of your $2500 hydraulic brake booster assembly...
 
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1) Every coolant hose that exists. Rad hoses, front and rear heater hoses, oil cooler hoses, etc.
2) Cv axles and drive/hub flanges
3) fuel pump and fuel filter

save money for the eventual failure of your $2500 hydraulic brake booster assembly...

agreed on all of this. the brake booster, in my mind, is the Achilles heel of the 100 series. keep that brake fluid clean and read the instructions on top of the reservoir every night before bed.
 
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Dude, I have some bad news for you if you think that on the Toyota there is items "items would usually be marketed as lasting forever for Non-Toyota cars because most cars won't last beyond 250k miles". 100s got just as many parts that at 150-200k needs to get replaced due to wear. I don't think theres a top 3 because each rig will be different. Top of my head though: alternator, starter, radiator, key ignition rod, fuse box or worn fuse contacts for the EFI.

Even if your rig is dealership serviced, I can guarantee that a 100 series enthusiast that has put a lot of baselining and miles on theirs, can walk around and point a lot of worn things out. Dealerships only really fix failed items, and point out if its really needs attention. If you're ever in Colorado, hit up 2001LC, Paul the 100 series whisperer.

Theres nothing on the 100 that last forever except the drivetrain, a non rusty chassis, and the body. I have under 200k miles on mine and the list of things I've replaced due to failure or being worn is pretty extensive. Heres a starter, not sure if you've read this: The "Complete Parts List" for 180K Service - https://forum.ih8mud.com/threads/the-complete-parts-list-for-180k-service.1026898/

At 250k, I can bet every piece of rubber needs to be replaced. You also have a 07 which introduces a SAI pump. Those go out especially in colder climates earlier. My 100 has left me stranded three times from: bad fuel pump and a bad MAF sensor that didn't throw any codes. The maf sensor was regularly cleaned too but it failed out of nowhere.
 
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Dude, I have some bad news for you if you think that on the Toyota there is items "items would usually be marketed as lasting forever for Non-Toyota cars because most cars won't last beyond 250k miles". 100s got just as many parts that at 150-200k needs to get replaced due to wear. I don't think theres a top 3 because each rig will be different. Top of my head though: alternator, starter, radiator, key ignition rod, fuse box or worn fuse contacts for the EFI.

Even if your rig is dealership serviced, I can guarantee that a 100 series enthusiast that has put a lot of baselining and miles on theirs, can walk around and point a lot of worn things out. Dealerships only really fix failed items, and point out if its really needs attention. If you're ever in Colorado, hit up 2001LC, Paul the 100 series whisperer.

Theres nothing on the 100 that last forever except the drivetrain, a non rusty chassis, and the body. I have under 200k miles on mine and the list of things I've replaced due to failure or being worn is pretty extensive. Heres a starter, not sure if you've read this: The "Complete Parts List" for 180K Service - https://forum.ih8mud.com/threads/the-complete-parts-list-for-180k-service.1026898/

At 250k, I can bet every piece of rubber needs to be replaced. You also have a 07 which introduces a SAI pump. Those go out especially in colder climates earlier. My 100 has left me stranded three times from: bad fuel pump and a bad MAF sensor that didn't throw any codes. The maf sensor was regularly cleaned too but it failed out of nowhere.
Thanks all for the great info!

I wouldn't mind if I had to replace a few major items at a time to get it reasonably reliable. Still feel a lot more confident in a LC with 250k miles than a 2007 Range Rover with 80k miles. 😂
 

JunkCrzr89

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Still feel a lot more confident in a LC with 250k miles than a 2007 Range Rover with 80k miles.
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AlpineAccess

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Thanks all for the great info!

I wouldn't mind if I had to replace a few major items at a time to get it reasonably reliable. Still feel a lot more confident in a LC with 250k miles than a 2007 Range Rover with 80k miles. 😂

Cruising is more chill than roving.

The cruiser will complain for a few thousand miles about something being wrong before it needs to be fixed. A rover will act like everything is great and then stop shifting at the worst possible moment.
 

OwnerCS

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1) Every coolant hose that exists. Rad hoses, front and rear heater hoses, oil cooler hoses, etc.
2) Cv axles and drive/hub flanges
3) fuel pump and fuel filter

Heat kills 2uz engines, so don’t chance any leaks by doing #1. Worn outboard shaft splines and splines inside hub flanges stop a lot of people in their tracks, so keep the truck moving by doing #2. It’s astonishing to me how many original fuel filters and fuel pumps people are running at 200k+ miles, which seem to fail at the most importune time; so do #3 to keep the engine running. There is of course a caveat here and that is save money for the eventual failure of your $2500 hydraulic brake booster assembly...

I've baselined three two hundred thousand mile vehicles in the past 5 years.

They all get the items listed above in addition to a new fuel pressure regulator, under the hood rubber fuel hoses, injector o-rings and screens (I do this myself), and rubber vacuum hoses. After they pass 21 years old, under the hood rubber starts to become brittle.
 
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I've baselined three two hundred thousand mile vehicles in the past 5 years.

They all get the items listed above in addition to a new fuel pressure regulator, under the hood rubber fuel hoses, injector o-rings and screens (I do this myself), and rubber vacuum hoses. After they pass 21 years old, under the hood rubber starts to become brittle.

Couple of questions:

1) does the pressure regulator improve anything when changed? Or do you just change it when it fails?

2) I really want to do a full vacuum hose swap. I was hoping there would be a kit of all the hoses somewhere but have not found one. Did you piece meal it together? Or just but a long length of tube that covers most of them?
 

OwnerCS

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Couple of questions:

1) does the pressure regulator improve anything when changed? Or do you just change it when it fails?

2) I really want to do a full vacuum hose swap. I was hoping there would be a kit of all the hoses somewhere but have not found one. Did you piece meal it together? Or just but a long length of tube that covers most of them?

I just replace them as part of the fuel rail maintenance process. More about the likelihood of failure after 22 years of service. Once I do a full fuel and hose baseline, I haven't found a need to fix had issues in the decade following.

I think there is a listing on here for vacuum hose. Just need to find it. I purchased two assortments of silicone vacuum hoses for my 99 Tacoma. I may look to use some of those with the exception of some specialty-shaped hoses where they will not work.
 
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If you're ever in Colorado, hit up 2001LC, Paul the 100 series whisperer.
Hi hickuptruck, do you happen to know if our friend 2001LC (Paul) has a mechanic shop in Colorado? I'd feel sorry if I had to bother him from his busy life during my next coast to coast trip if he doesn't work on cars as his daily job :p
 
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You also need to take into consideration parts that will leave you stranded VS parts that just need to be replaced for comfort purposes. Most of our rigs are going on 20 years + 200k so many parts have worn.

If I had a bigger piggy bank I would replace all bushings and other items on my rig, but at the same time if my upper control arm bushings are wearing it won't leave me stranded in the woods so I would rather put funds towards mission critical parts. For example, If your radiator isn't leaking, you don't need to put a new one in just for the heck of it. It won't just explode, most parts will give signs of failure, keep an eye on your rig and replace parts as needed unless you have an unlimited budget.
 

ramangain

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Another way to look at it is that your rig is beyond the Ronco Oven useful age/mileage. You can't just set it and forget it; stuff will fail more often if it was installed during assembly.
 

AlpineAccess

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Hi hickuptruck, do you happen to know if our friend 2001LC (Paul) has a mechanic shop in Colorado? I'd feel sorry if I had to bother him from his busy life during my next coast to coast trip if he doesn't work on cars as his daily job :p
He does but it is on appointment
 
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You also need to take into consideration parts that will leave you stranded VS parts that just need to be replaced for comfort purposes. Most of our rigs are going on 20 years + 200k so many parts have worn.

If I had a bigger piggy bank I would replace all bushings and other items on my rig, but at the same time if my upper control arm bushings are wearing it won't leave me stranded in the woods so I would rather put funds towards mission critical parts. For example, If your radiator isn't leaking, you don't need to put a new one in just for the heck of it. It won't just explode, most parts will give signs of failure, keep an eye on your rig and replace parts as needed unless you have an unlimited budget.
Well, the radiator has plastic end tanks so it literally could explode but I get your point anyway :)
 

OwnerCS

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Couple of questions:

1) does the pressure regulator improve anything when changed? Or do you just change it when it fails?

2) I really want to do a full vacuum hose swap. I was hoping there would be a kit of all the hoses somewhere but have not found one. Did you piece meal it together? Or just but a long length of tube that covers most of them?

The more common case for FPR failure that I've seen over the years comes after the injector rail has been removed to go under the intake manifold or to service/replace old injector o-rings. After an old FPR is exposed to air and allowed to dry out, it seems an increased likelihood for failure comes afterward. Not immediately, but soon enough to be a pain.
 

JunkCrzr89

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The more common case for FPR failure that I've seen over the years comes after the injector rail has been removed to go under the intake manifold or to service/replace old injector o-rings. After an old FPR is exposed to air and allowed to dry out, it seems an increased likelihood for failure comes afterward. Not immediately, but soon enough to be a pain.
I concur.
 

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