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Tire problems

Discussion in '60-Series Wagons' started by mtb_rider, Mar 2, 2007.

  1. mtb_rider

    mtb_rider

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    Son of a bitch man. So this evening I had an appointment at a local tire store to get all new valve stems put it because one of mine was messed up, so I figured I might as well get all new. Well I got that done and everything, and then tonight I went to a buddies house for a couple hours, and on the way home my truck was squirrelly and tippy as hell. It was actually a bit on the scary side, especially since it's raining, as usual in the N.W. When I got home I grabbed my flashlight and looked at the tires, and not one, but both back fu***ng tires are almost flat. Like, less than 10psi, almost flat. Won't even read on the pressure gauge, almost flat. Now I have to miss, or at least be extremely late to work, costing me more money, and figure out this situation. Probably going to have to make them come out with their truck and onboard compressor and air me up just so I can actually drive the bitch to their shop, cuz they will be flat by morning. All because they are to god damn inempt (sp?) to do a ******* valve stem replacement. It's one fu***ng nut, washer, and a rubber gasket. WTF?!!!
     
  2. Tinker

    Tinker

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    Get a ride to work, call the shop & let them handle it.
     
  3. mtb_rider

    mtb_rider

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    The shop opens at 8, and they have a big roadside service truck with compressors and s***. Work is slow so I am going to start out by calling them and making them come here to air me up. I really don't have anyone near by that can give me a ride. I work at a small shop with just two other guys, one being the owner, and neither of them come from direction.
     
  4. ranger

    ranger

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    Fix a flat is always good to carry for times like these, or a 12V compressor.
    You can use a bicycle pump to air up your tire. All you do is jack up the tire you want to air up, and go to it. Not the fastest method, but it also works in a pinch.
     
  5. mtb_rider

    mtb_rider

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    Actually just got ahold of 'em. They're "sending somebody out as quick as they can." Man, I'm just fuming. I know it's just a couple flat tires and they'll fix it for free and yada yada yada, but those tires haven't even been on a full week yet. And I was only have them stems replaced because I was noticing when I was checking pressures and topping off with air when I bolted them up that one of them had messed up threads ( I have the recessed stems that you screw the adapter into to air up and check pressure ), but none of them leaked. I just went ahead and had all new stems put in as preventative maintenance, knowing that they were all old, and I was doing one, may as well do the other 3. Now I get two flats. Seems kind of bass ackwards to me.
     
  6. mtb_rider

    mtb_rider

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    Don't think fix a flat will air up a 33x12.5, but correct me if I'm wrong. Never really liked it. Makes a mess of the inside of your tires. I have a 110/12V rechargeable compressor, which is dead. Never actually used it. Got it as a gift about 3 years ago. Probably should charge it up and keep it more handy. I found another that I want. It's an actual little compressor with a 10 foot hose, 150 psi max, runs off 12v, but I don't have it yet. By the time i get BOTH tires pumped up with a bike pump, they will probably be here. Not to mention my arms would probably be useless the rest of the day.
     
  7. High Desert

    High Desert

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    Check out the threads in the gear/recovery forum on portable 12V air compressors. Some pretty good info there on inexpensive pumps, like $49. range
     
  8. landcrusher06

    landcrusher06

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    portable air compressor

    Good suggestion as stated above
    I always carry a small 12v compressor(very cheap)that plugs into cigarette lighter. This has gotten me home 2 times in the last 18 months. This can help no matter who caused the problem. on time a slow leak caused by a nail and started going flat while on the interstate and the other time I was doing a little light offroad wheeling and cracked the valvestem with a slow leak.

    Your tire company could not have checked for leaks using a soap solution after completing the work. Bad QA/QC


    Feel your frustration, but nobody killed or injured

    Good luck
     
  9. fowldarr

    fowldarr

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    Worst case scenario you could have been killed, but I've also noticed that if you are low in one or more tire these things get squirrly
     
  10. mtb_rider

    mtb_rider

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    Well, got it all fixed up today, or at least it seems so far. I will say this. They were VERY quick to not only get here this morning with their roadside truck to air my tires up, but also very prompt and apologetic about fixing it. No I don't believe they checked the new stems for leaks when they finished them last night. If they did, it was a very half assed attempt. When I dropped it back off this morning they were going to fix it right away while I waited, but I told them to keep it and I would come back later in the day to make sure they had plenty of time to be thorough this time, as to not have anymore issues. As far as 12V compressors, I actually found one about a week ago I plan to pick up. It's actually bigger than the cigarette lighter ones. It uses a little piston motor, puts out 150psi, has 33 ft coiled air hose, and 10 ft, 4ga battery cables with jumper cable style clips you hook right to your battery. I saw it on sale in a flyer for like $49.
     
  11. justin85-60

    justin85-60

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    Hey Mtb,
    Where did you go? Cause well I'm in the Portland area, and I think you are too. Just want to know so that I can avoid that shop. Personally I always go to schwabb. Never let me down. Not that cheapest, but great service and never have issues.
     
  12. mtb_rider

    mtb_rider

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    LOL. Well I went to Schwab....in Wilsonville. It's right on my home from work. I can truly say it was an honest mistake, and they did not hesitate at all to take care of it. No real harm done except some serious frustration and about an hour missed of work. Up until about a month and half ago my bro-in-law was service manager for Firestone (hence the Firestone mudders), first in Beavy, then Tigard, so he always took care of me. He has since switched jobs, and though they have a tire machine at the dealership he is working at, I thought just for a simple stem replacement, it wouldn't be worth the trouble.
     
  13. ellington12

    ellington12

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    so was it the stems that were leaking or the beads? i'm assuming they had to remove the tires from the wheel. remounting used tires can be dicey, especially on alloy wheels.

    regardless, they should have dunked the tires to ensure they were airtight before sending them off.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2007