Tire load recommendations

Discussion in 'FJ Cruiser' started by SSG, Nov 10, 2018.

  1. SSG

    SSG

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  2. 1911

    1911 chupacabra

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    I ran E-load Toyo Open Country MT on mine for a long time. They lasted nearly forever, and I never ever had a single flat in them or a cut sidewall on rocks - but the sidewalls were stiff, and I had to air them down to 8 or 9 pounds to get the sidewall to soften at all. When aired up for the highway (35 psi), they were loud and the ride was more harsh than lesser tires. When they finally wore out, I went with C-rated Toyo AT. They flex way better when aired down, and are not as noisy and harsh on the highway.

    Maybe the KM3's are different.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2018
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  3. SSG

    SSG

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    Ah ok. I think the KO2s in C-rated would be a better fit for less road noise/harshness. Thanks.
     
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  4. GWcruiser

    GWcruiser

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    My FJ is my daily driver. I run the non-LT version of these Goodyear Kevlar tires. They are quiet, have good rated snow/ice traction, and worked pretty well on slick-rock and mud. But when aired down to 20 psi I never noticed a difference in ride or traction, even though the tire was looking so flat I was worried about popping a bead loose. But lower pressures did help when dropping off steps; less tail end bounce. I was considering going with 285's on my next set for the added diameter.

    WRANGLER ALL-TERRAIN ADVENTURE WITH KEVLAR - SIZE: 265/70R17

    https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Goodyear&tireModel=Wrangler+All-Terrain+Adventure+with+Kevlar&sidewall=Blackwall&autoMake=Toyota&autoYear=2012&autoModel=FJ Cruiser&autoModClar=&partnum=67TR7WATA&tab=Sizes


    ps: I have about 30k miles on my set, and still plenty of tread remaining: about 4/32 of the original 12/32.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2018
  5. SSG

    SSG

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    Thanks. I will check these out. Leaning towards the KO2s right now.
     
  6. jmylie

    jmylie

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    I've had balancing issues with BFG tires.

    I run Toyo MT's and they have proven to be round with no balancing issues.
     
  7. GWcruiser

    GWcruiser

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    Give a truck tire to most balance machine operators and they can mess it up. The cones they use to balance with let tires skew, resulting in all sorts of problems.

    If you ever see weights on the top inside and bottom outside of a rim, you know whoever balanced the tire was a supreme idiot. There are lug centric tools for balancing tires on rims. Toyota calls them a "Precision Wheel Balance Adapter." They work every time because they keep the heavy wheel plumb/perpendicular to the balancer axis. Cones don't unless the 'driver' is extremely careful; even then the result isn't as good as lug centric.

    I'm sure some will argue about lugs not being the center of a wheel, but truth is they are machined with the same precision as the center hole, and if you think back to old steel rims, the center hole was stamped, and rarely true center, while the lug holes were machine drilled. And none of this centering matters if the operator doesn't ensure the wheel is perpendicular to the balancer shaft. Also, most balancer backplates can't get a good 'fit' to the inside of a cast wheel, so operators try to use two cones, or a sloppy fitting small plate backing.

    Again - a quick check is to look at the weights. If any weight is on the opposite sides of a wheel, whoever balanced the tire should be fired. All added weight should be within a 90 to 120 degree cone on one half the tire. Here's an example of a sad sickly balance:

    [​IMG]

    This isn't the Toyota adapter, but it looks something like this:

    [​IMG]
     
  8. NyNomad

    NyNomad

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    E or D... E I believe is more recommended per the weight of the FJ
     
  9. GWcruiser

    GWcruiser

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    My FJ came with 118 rated tires, not 121. And at 5600 lbs GVWR and 2679 lbs per tire, static weight isn't a factor. The LT or 121 version is rated 3195 lbs; not a huge increase.

    If you want a big tire look, there is a LT285R17 - adds an just under an inch tread width and an inch in diameter (33" class). And is also rated 3195 lbs.

    My next tires will very likely be the 285's.
     
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