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Tips on arc welding patch panels on the quarters...???

Discussion in '60-Series Wagons' started by vtcruiser60, Jul 21, 2005.

  1. vtcruiser60

    vtcruiser60 SILVER Star

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    Working with what I have (basic stick welder), I am thinking about tackling my rusty rear quarter panels. One side has rust 1/2 to 1 1/2 inches along the wheel arch and into the dog leg. The other side is less bad.

    I know how to cut and prep for rust, but am less certain about my stick welding skills on 18-20 gauge sheet metal. I am inclined to work with something like 1/16 rods.

    What is your experience here? What kind of sticks and amps? Have people had luck with butt welds? Should I flange the existing sheet metal, drill holes in the donor pieces and tack? Stitch?
     
  2. leonard_nemoy

    leonard_nemoy

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    The only rod I could think of that might work would be a 3/32 6011 rod, I can't tell you what to put your amps to I would guess 35 to 65 but you should expierement on some scrap sheet metal first until you get it down.
     
  3. RoddQLD

    RoddQLD

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    I'm not an eperience welder by any measure, but one thing that I'm fairly sure about is that you shouldn't attempt to use a stick welder (arc welder) for sheetmetal.
    You would be far better off hiring a MIG or even an Oxy welder for that type of work.

    Honestly, don't waste your time with the stick welder on sheetmetal!
    (or at least practice on some scrap first so that you will see the mess that it will make!)
     
  4. FL cruiser

    FL cruiser

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    Kind of a recipie for panal warpage from too much heat.
    Even with a mig using .045 or larger wire (which is small) requires turning up the welder power to a degree enough to melt the wire, is too much heat for thin sheet metal.
    .023 or .030 wire is preffered.
     
  5. JRFJ4-

    JRFJ4-

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    6013

    Go buy some new 6013 rods. As small as they have.

    You can always plug weld places.

    The most important thing about stick welding is having good dry rods. If they have been sitting out. Wrap them in aluminum foil and put them in oven on about 250 for an hour. You'll be amazed how much better they do.

    J.R.
     
  6. xjnation

    xjnation

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    I had to use an arc welder for about the same thing. I just butt welded them at around 30 amps but I put a 3/4" strip behind it to make the metal a little thicker. Didnt look too bad after finishing. Just use smatt stitches at a time, like 1/2". dont get it too hot. p.s. the strip i used also helped keep everything level and flush. 6013 rods are recomended.
     
  7. Mace

    Mace rock scientist.. Staff Member s-Moderator

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    .045 is small???


    .030 is standard with solid core.
    Flux core typically is .035

    You can do sheet steel with stick. Tig is just a glorified stick welding. You jusat have to know what you are doing. Get the smallest rod you can possibly find. and practice.. Do some test patches on some junk metal before you decide to go hog wild on your truck.
     
  8. vtcruiser60

    vtcruiser60 SILVER Star

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    Keep those recs coming.

    I have been working with 6011 sticks for awhile now, but getting a fair amount of burn through, particularly on the edges of my lap joints. I have tried stitching mainly.

    Someone mentioned burning at 30 amps. That might do the trick, I know I have been playing around with 45-55amps....the higher amps for playing with 1/4 inch steel.

    If I try plug welding with lap joints, how much space can I allow between the two pieces of metal before welding in the plug? Because of my clamps, I am usually pretty tight on the edges, but the gaps open up towards the middle of the pieces....that is when I get burn through on the edges and through the metal.