Time Capsule, 67 FJ40, 44K Original miles (1 Viewer)

Mtntopper

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Tackled a tiny item.
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Here's the hood I grabbed, it's been repainted but it was white before too, there is a big difference in sheen between the hood and the sides of the truck.
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Thanks for the info, I read through the threads, I will post some more pics specific to my situation in hopes that we can all reach a consensus on the best path forward. Just for reassurance, my buddy with the collision center that is helping me with the frame, this is the garage at his house:

Here: Land Cruiser Bumper, Frame, Skidplates 40, 45, & 55 Series - https://www.sor.com/cat106.sor#106-19A

106-19A-big.jpg


About 2/3 of the way down. Figures Marv would have made these available.
 
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G-Cat

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Likely you are well aware of this thread...great tips for reviving old single stage paint.
 

Mtntopper

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Mtntopper

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Here: Land Cruiser Bumper, Frame, Skidplates 40, 45, & 55 Series - https://www.sor.com/cat106.sor#106-19A

106-19A-big.jpg


About 2/3 of the way down. Figures Marv would have made these available.
Not sure I can get a wrench inside the frame rail either, but my leading idea so far is to try grade 8 bolts. Ideally welded from the backside and ground down on the front side a bit. I think if the shock tower ever gets loose, just grind, drill and cut out the old bolts and set new bolts. Obviously not as good as a rivet, but not sure how to anvil the inside of the rivets inside the frame rail.
 
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Dizzy

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If you could get a (DIY-fabbed?) jack screw, with a concave head, in the frame rail, then you could shape the head of the rivet on the shock tower side?

Personally, I'd get a mid-grade, fine-thread, metric bolt, with lockwasher, and anti-sieze, and fasten it down, knowing that it wouldn't have quite as much service life. And, actually, if the rivet was wacked out of place, I'd consider the possibility of a compromised shock tower, as it is a cast piece? I'd definitely not weld a high-grade (SAE grade 8) bolt.
 

Mtntopper

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If you could get a (DIY-fabbed?) jack screw, with a concave head, in the frame rail, then you could shape the head of the rivet on the shock tower side?

Personally, I'd get a mid-grade, fine-thread, metric bolt, with lockwasher, and anti-sieze, and fasten it down, knowing that it wouldn't have quite as much service life. And, actually, if the rivet was wacked out of place, I'd consider the possibility of a compromised shock tower, as it is a cast piece? I'd definitely not weld a high-grade (SAE grade 8) bolt.
Sound advice @Dizzy. The shock tower is cast, and while I don't see a crack now, trying to straighten it could finish it off. I'll source a good tower and plan on replacing it. Thanks for catching that.
 

Mtntopper

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Dropped the '67 off at the Collison center this afternoon. Stopped by my buddies house on the way, he owns the Collison center.
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Dizzy

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Regardless, won't hurt to install an undamaged shock tower as opposed to a damaged one. I am curious though about not welding the high-grade bolt, is it too brittle?
If the high-grade bolt was manufactured by a process with quench and temper, its properties will change uncontrollably with welding, perhaps becoming brittle in areas, and no longer a bit elastic/ductile (like it was rendered during the tempering process).
 
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Not sure I can get a wrench inside the frame rail either, but my leading idea so far is to try grade 8 bolts. Ideally welded from the backside and ground down on the front side a bit. I think if the shock tower ever gets loose, just grind, drill and cut out the old bolts and set new bolts. Obviously not as good as a rivet, but not sure how to anvil the inside of the rivets inside the frame rail.

Toyota set the shock towers on after the inner and outer frame rails were assembled...I think. Who knows what kind of hydraulics they had to install and set those little red hot mushrooms. To do it in place you'd have to start with the preformed head inside the rail with the shank protruding through to the exterior. Then wedge it in place with some tapered steel blocks and heat up the shank and pound it into shape with a rivet set or the like. Might take a few heats/tries so I don't know if that has any consequences for the metal of the rivet. Looking at the formed-in -place heads on the rivets on my '78 frame, they don't seem to have been done all that well. Probably just my luck :rolleyes:

I think it's important to remember that we're not talking about an spring hanger or an engine mount bracket. Shock towers take some force but they (generally) don't support the vehicle's weight on these older rigs. Grade 5 is probably good enough but that's only a guess on my part. One way or the other you'll need to see if the holes in the frame were elongated from the impact or if the rivets stretched/broke.

Are all frame rivets the same diameter?
 

Mtntopper

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Toyota set the shock towers on after the inner and outer frame rails were assembled...I think. Who knows what kind of hydraulics they had to install and set those little red hot mushrooms. To do it in place you'd have to start with the preformed head inside the rail with the shank protruding through to the exterior. Then wedge it in place with some tapered steel blocks and heat up the shank and pound it into shape with a rivet set or the like. Might take a few heats/tries so I don't know if that has any consequences for the metal of the rivet. Looking at the formed-in -place heads on the rivets on my '78 frame, they don't seem to have been done all that well. Probably just my luck :rolleyes:

I think it's important to remember that we're not talking about an spring hanger or an engine mount bracket. Shock towers take some force but they (generally) don't support the vehicle's weight on these older rigs. Grade 5 is probably good enough but that's only a guess on my part. One way or the other you'll need to see if the holes in the frame were elongated from the impact or if the rivets stretched/broke.

Are all frame rivets the same diameter?
Not sure if all frame rivets are the same diameter.
The plan is to grind the heads off the four shock tower rivets, then drill and punch them out. The existing rivet holes will then be drilled slightly larger for the bolts. Hopefully that will take care of any holes that were stretched during the impact.
 

Mtntopper

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I have a 1967 that's in similar shape as yours, i.e. a bone stock rig. I am going to be going through the same in a month or so... new bushings, brakes, fuel, all the cooling lines, etc.

Toyota doesn't have part numbers going back before 3/69, so do post up any interchanged part numbers that you come across and I'll do the same.

@Goforth (a fellow 1967 owner) shared this with me which I have been using to build my list of parts: FJ40 Parts Catalog Index - The Old Cruiser - https://www.theoldcruiser.com/toyota-land-cruiser-parts-catalogs/fj40-parts-catalog-index-93658-67/
That catalog is awesome. Thanks for sharing it.
 

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