Thanks Mud! Front Axle is done! (1 Viewer)

Joined
Dec 4, 2004
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2,232
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Tucson AZ
 
 
 
Well, it was a job that I had planned on doing as PM, and as it was it was still mostly PM. The DS was just starting to leak, but it was far from being soup in there. Alvin/MaddBaggins hosted me at his house, it took both of us working both sides about 10 hours to do a complete rebuild and put on new discs and 100 series pads. I worked much harder than Alvin but he did manage to stay sober ;p . In reality, neither of us worked very hard (just steady) and spent most of the time trying to out 'smart ass' the other.

Reflections on the job:

1. Lots of shop towels, degreaser and such make it much nicer. A second person who knows what they are doing is helpful, not that I would know what that is like Alvin:).

2. Get the wheel bearings and just plan on replacing them. Two of mine from the knuckle housing were trashed and it made it much faster not having to go out and source them, especially on a Sunday which is probably not the best day to find out you need parts.

3. PO's and the people they have doing the work are apt to do stupid stuff. There was a gasket on the wrong side of the knuckle housing, the side with the drain. Some how the asshat last in there also threaded the hub nuts on badly on the DS spindle, requiring some first aid with a file to remove burs. Both Alvin and I were afraid that the spindle was toast, but we "got-R-dun".

4. 3, 14 oz tubes of Moly grease and 1, 14 oz tube of MP grease are enough.

5. The new rotors look great. The new 100 series pads fit with out any alterations. Both inside pads fit 'tightly'. The PS side took a bit of effort and I was quite concerned that that the assembly was frozen. A couple of turns around the block, no noise, vibrations or other. It didn't feel bound up and was able to idle up an inclined driveway. I don't notice any improvement in braking ability from fresh 80 series pads, but hopefully they wear longer.

6. It is a hard, long day. Start early. I got to Alvin's around 7am and we didn't really get started until around 8 am after getting all the parts and what not out of my truck and the area organized.

I couldn't have done it with out mud, the search button or Alvin. Many of you helped me and didn't know it, but your past posts helped this be a very smooth operation. I wouldn't have met Alvin if it were not for mud either. His help and experience were what tipped this from a tedious/nerve wracking job to a very fun and enjoyable day. Thanks Alvin, you are the man!. :bounce: :bounce:

Ross
 
Joined
Mar 27, 2003
Messages
5,698
Location
Camas, WA USA
 
 
 
Congrats, you are a birf virgin no longer! :D It was a nice feeling of accomplishment when i did it last year on the old fzj...
 

MaddBaggins

Remember the KnightRider!
Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Messages
3,547
Location
The Old Pueblo
 
Hey Ross, I was happy to help! I think a birf job is a great way to really get to know your new friends! You didn't lose a wheel on the way home did ya!? Lugnuts :doh:
Get yourself a grease gun and after a few days of driving around, open the grease fill plug and squirt in about 1/4 of that leftover tube in each cavity.
Talk to you soon bud :cheers:
 
Joined
Aug 9, 2003
Messages
9,014
 
 
 
Congrats. Mentally put about $1000 in your bank account that you saved, plus the satisfaction and peace of mind that it was done correctly.

DougM
 
Joined
Dec 4, 2004
Messages
2,232
Location
Tucson AZ
 
 
 
Couple of other things that came to mind.

Get a bearing/seal setting kit. You can borrow one from Autozone for free. It make getting in the new seals and race a piece of cake. I need to get a list of what they have. This service can come in very handy for those tools you rarely ever need. The brass drifts come in very handy as well.

Take a mental picture of the last picture in this thread . Neither the picture in the FSM nor the verbal directions are really applicable or helpful. We did it correctly using our astute mental capabilities :idea: and just 'logic-ed' our way through it with what we remembered from the disassembly. I found this thread after waking up this morning wondering if we did put it back together correctly. I am sure the Reiss DVD would have been very helpful in this regard.

Don't be in too much of a hurry to finish that you forget to torque your lug nuts. I have it on good authority that you will feel very foolish if you do this :eek: .

Ross
 

Onur

19000-17930
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Location
Tabasco, NY
 
 
 
GeoRoss said:
Well, it was a job that I had planned on doing as PM, and as it was it was still mostly PM. The DS was just starting to leak, but it was far from being soup in there. Alvin/MaddBaggins hosted me at his house, it took both of us working both sides about 10 hours to do a complete rebuild and put on new discs and 100 series pads. I worked much harder than Alvin but he did manage to stay sober ;p . In reality, neither of us worked very hard (just steady) and spent most of the time trying to out 'smart ass' the other.

Reflections on the job:

1. Lots of shop towels, degreaser and such make it much nicer. A second person who knows what they are doing is helpful, not that I would know what that is like Alvin:).

2. Get the wheel bearings and just plan on replacing them. Two of mine from the knuckle housing were trashed and it made it much faster not having to go out and source them, especially on a Sunday which is probably not the best day to find out you need parts.

3. PO's and the people they have doing the work are apt to do stupid stuff. There was a gasket on the wrong side of the knuckle housing, the side with the drain. Some how the asshat last in there also threaded the hub nuts on badly on the DS spindle, requiring some first aid with a file to remove burs. Both Alvin and I were afraid that the spindle was toast, but we "got-R-dun".

4. 3, 14 oz tubes of Moly grease and 1, 14 oz tube of MP grease are enough.

5. The new rotors look great. The new 100 series pads fit with out any alterations. Both inside pads fit 'tightly'. The PS side took a bit of effort and I was quite concerned that that the assembly was frozen. A couple of turns around the block, no noise, vibrations or other. It didn't feel bound up and was able to idle up an inclined driveway. I don't notice any improvement in braking ability from fresh 80 series pads, but hopefully they wear longer.

6. It is a hard, long day. Start early. I got to Alvin's around 7am and we didn't really get started until around 8 am after getting all the parts and what not out of my truck and the area organized.

I couldn't have done it with out mud, the search button or Alvin. Many of you helped me and didn't know it, but your past posts helped this be a very smooth operation. I wouldn't have met Alvin if it were not for mud either. His help and experience were what tipped this from a tedious/nerve wracking job to a very fun and enjoyable day. Thanks Alvin, you are the man!. :bounce: :bounce:

Ross

Good observations Ross. I especially agree with the more 'social aspects' of wrenching, more so on the cruisers with some good guys around. Here in the Northeast and Central Ohio area, we've got a bunch of older guys who have been wrenching on cruisers and other Toys. for a very long time. Most of the time, when most of us get together, I tend to spend a lot of time wrenching and listening to directions. These guys know there stuff...it's kind of humbling knowing that between these good folks in Ohio and the folks on MUD, we could easily write ten books--if not more--about wrenching on cruisers.

On a side note, it is interesting that the front end job/birf. job is so talked up here. Once you really get into it, the job really isn't that bad. Mainly as you and others (especially the other birf. thread going) have noted, the big deal is about the number of cans of brake cleaner and paper towels that one has to go through to really do justice to what really is normal maintenance procedures.

If everything goes smoothly (they rarely do... :doh: ), next time you should be able to do this alone (though better with buds and some suds--or Pepsi--) in one day. And as IDoug says often, knowing that it was done correctly by you previously makes opening the front end up a bit easier the next time around...

Oh--yes, I am working on the diss. MUD is my diss. break, muse, inspiration, and my procrastination.... ;) :eek:

Best.
-onur
 

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