1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Spring Dilemma

Discussion in '40- & 55-Series Tech' started by Kevin, Mar 26, 2004.

  1. Kevin

    Kevin

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2004
    I have leaned a lot about leaf springs from my last posting, so I'll try not to bore you all with the same questions. I think I also learned a lot about ROTEL oil LMAO. I work full time and I am taking 19 units in school, so I don't have a lot of time. I have two kids and a mortgage, so I am a little hard pressed for $ also. Taking my springs off, taking them apart, painting them, greasing them and finally putting them back on is a big job.

    Buying new springs is also relatively expensive. I called my local shop and they want about $600.00 for a Skyjacker kit. I figure it's worth rebuilding mine if they are not totally flat. I have heard several contradicting ways of telling weather your springs are worn out or not. One person told me the angle on the front shackle should be perpendicular to the ground. Someone else mentioned 30 degree angle. My front shackle angles b/t 15-30 degrees forward. What I mean by forward is that the lower part of the shackle (part that bolt to the leaf) protrudes forward. Is there any other way to tell if my spings are worn out? I just don't want to go through all the work of rebuilding them if they are shot anyway. If any one has an idea of how to tell if my springs are worn out, then plz let me know.

    Thanks
    Kevin
     
  2. bsilva132

    bsilva132

    Messages:
    1,011
    Media:
    5
    Albums:
    2
    Likes Received:
    7
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2003
    Location:
    Elk Grove, Ca
    you do not want you shackle straight up and down. That gives a harsh ride. some say 45 degs orthers say less. The point being is that you want a little angle on the shackle to give a less harsh ride. Unless they are completely flat and the tires are rubbing just take them appart and clean and paint them. If you are pressed for time, do one at a time.
    -Brian
     
  3. tlcgear

    tlcgear

    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    I know the cituation you are on, I have a regular job, go to school, teach at a college and do freelance on the site. I also have a family, car payments and all that crap. So I don't like spending money on the cruiser if I don' have to. I took my springs appart and took the wire wheel to them. painted them and put them back in the truck in one night, may be two hours worth of work, and they look great. I also bought some center pins at a local suspension shop for $2.00 for all 4.

    - Rico.
     
  4. Kevin

    Kevin

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2004
    Well that's inspiring! I'll have to tackle this on Sunday. So you say they look great, but what about the ride? Did it improve a lot?
     
  5. theo

    theo

    Messages:
    1,432
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2002
    [quote author=Kevin link=board=1;threadid=13756;start=msg127588#msg127588 date=1080333485]
    Well that's inspiring! I'll have to tackle this on Sunday. So you say they look great, but what about the ride? Did it improve a lot?
    [/quote]

    Well, you've done it! You made the decision to work on your old springs and see how much it helps. Congratulations! (This is sarcasm, Kev. I know, the cheapest form of humor. :D ) To me, the old adage applies - "Sometimes you just have to step on your d**k and say OW."

    In my case, I opted to replace my springs, but only because I want to get into bigger sneakers. If I didn't want lift, I would pull the spring packs apart and lube 'em up. Then I'd know for sure what I hope you find out.

    good luck :)