Share your overhead welding techniques (1 Viewer)

Lil'John

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Title kind of states it.

My issue is with a "small" Mig welder. It is one of the 220v Miller Passport welders(dual voltage). I am welding on thicker 3/16" or 1/4" metal. I am running 0.03" Lincoln L-56 wire with 75/25 gas.

Symptoms with same settings: welding flat comes out pretty good. Welding in a joint going upward starts getting sketchy. Overhead butted to a flat vertical service looks like a pigeon was laying on its back and crapping; the weld spends more time running down that sticking.

Is it just running the welder too high? My experiment with wire speed didn't help the situation; 40 to 65 out of 100.

I found these two posts:
Welding technique - WAY out of position... <-- conflicting info: turn everything up and turn everything down
 
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Shouldn't be any hardware issues with that setup, I am assuming the L-56 is Lincolns name for ER70S wire. I'm also assuming nice clean material and 'decent' not perfect fit up.

I use the same settings for a given material range regardless of position. Have had best results keeping wire centered on joint using a slight whip ie. forward backward movement along the center of the joint. Use time at rear of puddle to get desired width, time slightly forward to let puddle solidify just a tad before getting back into it. Travel angle is usually slightly uphill if it applies, depends of situation. I recommend practicing technique/tuning settings flat and then try some practice joints overhead to get the hang of it. You will need a bit higher settings than average to get your puddle to work right. A very versatile technique, once you get the feel for it. Allows use of higher settings on a range of materials.

There will be limits to what you can actually achieve in terms of profile and single pass width but with practice you'll get it. Fun facts, here in Canada we have the Canadian Welding Bureau ie. CWB which looks after testing and qualifications of most structural welding, very similar to AWS stateside, I'm told the test plates are identical. When I left the trade years ago I had flat horizontal and vertical down solid wire mild steel mig tickets, there simply was no overhead test. Couple reasons for that but I digress. Regardless, plenty of overhead goes on in industry but only when there is no other effective option.

Let me know how it goes.
 

RUSH55

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I’ve never had a great deal of success overheading with a MIG. It’s gonna depend a little on what it is and how critical the penetration is and the appearance. I always had issues with the nozzle clogging up with spatter an wire seizing to the tips. And yes, looking like crap.
Have a lot better of a time welding with stick out of position than MIG, especially when using 3/32” 7018 rod set somewhere around 90 Amps on 1/4” material.
 
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My personal preference is to turn it up a bit, and just go like the devil. Keep backing back into the puddle to "push" it up into the joint. JUST KEEP MOVING!! That being said, my overhead is still never flat and perfect like flat and vertical can be. Even when I did my cert plates in school, my overhead wasn't all that pretty looking compared to the others, it does tend to blob up a bit more.
 

Lil'John

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I finally got around to getting it welded... not real pretty but it isn't overly structural so it will work to prevent rust from sneaking behind ;)

I basically had to turn down the heat a bunch... basically, I ended up max for 110V rather than almost max for 220v :meh: I knew I was running on the hot side for the material.

No burnt toes while welding in flip-flops :p
 

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