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screws

Discussion in '40- & 55-Series Tech' started by cruiserwanted, Dec 7, 2003.

  1. cruiserwanted

    cruiserwanted

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    I was wondering how everyone gets those 30 year old rusty screws out. I have a good set of craftsman screwdrivers. I have stipped a couple already and it is driving me nuts. I tried to drill them out but was using cordless 14.4v mikita drill. was not even making a dent with the bits I had. Special bits, more power? I know I need to go buy some tools so which ones would you suggets to get these stripped screws out. What a headache. They are the thorn in my side. Thanks for all the infomation and advice.
     
  2. Maintz

    Maintz

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    Advise: never go cheap on drill bits,.... buy some good high-speed bits, and depending on the screw sizes, any cordless driver should do. I spray mine with WD40 (I'd use WD80 if they had it) and let them stew awhile before I start cussing! Its also good to have a set of extractor bits when you garble or shear off the heads. I've been going back with stainless steel screws and bolts,... worth the extra expense.

    Good Luck,
    Maintz
     
  3. nuclearlemon

    nuclearlemon not an addict Moderator

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    are they recessed or the half round head? if they are the half round head, try getting vice grips on them after soaking them for a day or two with pb blaster or the like.
     
  4. CruisinGA

    CruisinGA

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    Nothing beats PB Blaster, and for the tough stuff, get them good n toasty and then spray some PB on them.
    Make sure you are using the largest possible screwdriver that fills up the screw head, and if necessary vise-grip the screwdriver so you can get more leverage and so you can devote one hand to pressing in hard.
    As far as drilling out, I have a few really good bits that I use when possible, and a set of decent bits. Even on hard metals my pneumatic drill gets them pretty good, way more powerful than a 14.4 cordless. Good bits will really help though.
     
  5. cruiserwanted

    cruiserwanted

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    Where do you guys buy these really good bits?? Went to Menards told the guy what I was doing and he told me what to use. Bought them and they sucked. I have a set of extractors buy need the starter hole to drill the extractor into. Aren't all bolts and screws pretty much stainless steel now? Thanks guys
     
  6. spotcruiser

    spotcruiser Geezer SILVER Star

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    You need a hand impact driver (has interchangeable bits and you hit it with a hammer). The bit rotates about 1/8 turn when struck with a hammer (cw or ccw depending on how you have it set). Indispensable for removing rusty door hinge, hood hinge, and windshield hinge screws. They're about $15 at Sears, Lowe's, Home Depot, Harbor Freight. You also need a heavy enough hammer (a one-hand 3-8 pound sledge). A standard nailing-type hammer just won't do the job.

    You should also get good at drilling out and re-tapping broken screws.

    Good Luck.
    Todd Bull.
     
  7. IDave

    IDave

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    I try to save as many screws as possible, to keep things stock. So, I'll second the impact driver idea. I also have successfully used the vise-grip method. I like PB Blaster as well, but sometimes there's nothing to it but drilling. Start with a small bit and work up. The smaller (tiny!) bits will penetrate often when the bigger bits just won't. Having a bit sharpener handy is good, too. I have broken enough screw extractors that I feel that if I am drilling, the screw is a goner, so I don't bother with extractors much anymore. So I work up the bits, drilling to the screw diameter. Quite often, just before I reach that point, the screw spins out (head runs up the bit) leaving the hole threads pretty much intact and usable. If it is too bad, I fill it with "liquid metal" and then retap the hole.
     
  8. fsusteve

    fsusteve

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    I pretty much second what Dave says, I have had zero luck with extractors too. Just tossed a $20 set of crapsman extractors in the trash after they stripped another screw head out.
     
  9. Landpimp

    Landpimp

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    just to add to the above, in hopes the screw will comeout...

    also use a screwdriver bit(one that fits right/tight) on a 3/8 ratchet/braker bar, push hard on the head of the rachet(or breaker bar) when turning, its suprising how well this works, better sometimes than a vise grip because the leverage is down low right on top of the head.

    Also, if you bugger up the head, and you have room to work, and before you brake out the drill. Take a grinder and cut a slot all the way across the head as deep as you can, then take the biggest flat blade you have(use above if you can) and give it one more shot..works prolly 1/2 of the time.

    I have had poor luck with impact drivers, prolly just me.
     
  10. fjcruiser

    fjcruiser

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    I do exactly what was talked about above. In addition, if it doesn't move, I drill it, then grind just enough of the top to get clear metal. I place a washer with a big enough hole to go around the outside of the bolt/screw. I then weld a nut on it. Works nearly every time.
    I use the washer so I don't accidentaly weld the nut to the body/frame.
     
  11. toddslater

    toddslater

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    Extractor set is garbage...hand impact drver with the right bit is my first weapon of choice with generous amounts of WD or other. If that doesn't work..depending on the location I'll either drill it out and re-tap or torch it off. I never re-use some rusted old POS that I had to battle getting of...I don't like sequels.
     
  12. cruiserwanted

    cruiserwanted

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    Thanks guys I knew I was missing a couple ways and everybody on this board has experience with this. I have the sledge guess I am buying an impact driver tomorrow and than maybe a torch on tuesday. I agree toddslater with re-using. Anyone know where I can buy stock in metric nut and bolts??? :D :beer:
     
  13. IDave

    IDave

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    I have been painting my reused screws with POR15 "Metal Mask". It seems to be doing the job. Has anyone tried zinc coating screws to rustproof them? I understand there are home kits you can use....
     
  14. nspctr1

    nspctr1

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    After I trashed a couple of mine, I used the craftsman robo grips on them . Got them all out and went down to the local shop where they sell specialty nuts and bolts and picked up new ones. works like a champ.
     
  15. HawkDriver

    HawkDriver

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    I also agree with above. However the best method I have used to prevent stripping in the first place involves using a speed handle (speed wrench) and an adapter with a bit on the end. Depending on location of the screw I try to put either most of my weight or a lot of force against the screw, then I use quick small but very forceful nudges until it turns. This gives great leverage and when you use small nudges you can prevent the bit from turning and chewing up the head. And if I can't get it out that way I still have plenty of the head left to go for the wd-40 or liquid-wrench and weld a nut on.

    Good luck
     
  16. mcfj40

    mcfj40

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  17. Bryan-71

    Bryan-71

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    I always soak them overnight in pb blaster then if they donnt come by hand, use impact driver (the kind you hit witha hammer). I made the mistake of putting the phillips adapter from the impact driver on my 1/2" impact..I have never seen a screw round out so fast in my life...last resort drill and use an ease out.
     
  18. Outback

    Outback

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    I have a set of those Craftsman "Screw out" things. These aren't like EZ-outs. They have "cutter" heads on them and dig into the head (if there's one left). I've used them a lot now and wish I had dropped the buck on them a long time ago.

    I'll definitely agree on the liberal use of PB Blaster beforehand.

    Jody.
     
  19. willsta2000

    willsta2000

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    What I've ended up doing is, on top of using some type of penetrating oil, throw the impact driver's bits in my impact wrench. With very low pressure, the impact wrench Slowly works the bolts out (I assume you're talking about the windshield hinge type bolts). Make sure, while you're holding the impact wrench chuck in your hand, the impacts are 1-2 per second. Any faster, and you'll run the risk of stripping those heads real quick. Plus with the impact wrench, you can put just about as much pressure against the bolt as you want.

    WILL
     
  20. yooper

    yooper SILVER Star

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    PB Blaster is OK, about 3 times better than WD40, but it sucks bad compared to Kroil ( http://www.kanolabs.com ), or Toyopeen (Toyota High Performance Penetrating Lubricant). A combination of Kroil and Toyopeen is like magic.

    Men@rd's just plain sucks - you will rarely find a good quality drill bit or any other tool at Men@rd's. Even the name brand tools (Stanley, Crescent) at Men@rd's are often seconds or the cheapest possible version from that manufacturer. (why do people bastardize the name of a company when they bad mouth them like I just did - is it so I won't get sued for slander?)

    The other tips mentioned above(breaker bar with bit, vice grip on screwdriver, impact driver, welding on a nut) are all excellent techniques. I also agree that EZ-outs suck and that the Craftsman screw-out version is definitely better, but still not a great tool.