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Saganaw steering gear install

Discussion in '95-older Toyota Truck Tech' started by Gumby, Jan 18, 2004.

  1. Gumby

    Gumby Supamod Staff Member s-Moderator

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    I don't know why anyone would want to duplicate this. There doesn't seem to be a lot of interest in dropping a 350 in a T, or a SAS, but so far it has been really easy.
    The 350 fits with a ton of room and a full width D-44 is within an inch or so of the rear axle width.

    What i did today was install the saganaw steering. A normal SAS would probably be easier with the IFS steering gear, but since I installed the Chevy motor my choices were adapt the GM steering shaft and fab a sag gear mount or use the IFS box. Then I'd have to adapt the hoses to have two different ends and make a steering link with two different tie rod ends. Easy enough, but tough to find spares. Also I would still have to fab a mount since the stock gear sat to far back for the axle placement.

    I used a gear and steering shaft from a 95 GMC 3500 2WD dually. The gear is mounted to the frame about 1/4 inch forward of the crossmember. The front bottom bolt is under the frame, with the rear bottom bolt through the frame. Both are sleaved with 9/16 ID tube. The top bolt is about an inch above the frame, also sleaved. I sandwiched the frame with a pair of 1/4" plates. The gear is held off the inner plate by 1/2" tall peices of 3/4 ID DOM tube. The plates are welded to the frame and the sleaves. The gear is held on with three 14mm bolts.

    The steering shaft was fun to build. I used the GM shaft for ease of fit to the box, but I needed to adapt it to the Toyota steering column and lengthen it a bit. I used a chunk of 1" stock ground into a double D for a snug fit into the steering shaft end. i drilled the 3/8 hole through the stock hole and dropped a grade 8 bolt through. I had to turn the other end down to fit inside a chunk of the 3/4" ID DOM I had. I also had to turn down the Toyota column stub to 3/4, but that was just a tiny bit. I drilled both and welded in 1/4 round stock as well as welded the seams. I used the stock plate that went through the firewall, but I had to make an angled mount for the 3/4 pillow block bearing. That was a beeeatch to get just right.

    I took a couple of progress pics and I can take some finished pics if anybody is interested, but like i said, i don't know anybody doing this conversion. Still, I had to post. You never know. ;)
     
  2. the shed guy

    the shed guy

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    Lets see some pics then?
     
  3. Gumby

    Gumby Supamod Staff Member s-Moderator

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    This one is of the gear mounted on the rail
     
  4. Gumby

    Gumby Supamod Staff Member s-Moderator

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    This is the peice I had to make between the GM shaft and the Toyota shaft.
     
  5. Toyoland66

    Toyoland66

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    Are you using a D44 because the T-Case is driver side dump?

    I dont know much about T-100's but it looks like you are building a pretty sweet rig.

    Peace Out
     
  6. Gumby

    Gumby Supamod Staff Member s-Moderator

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    [quote author=Toyoland66 link=board=19;threadid=10278;start=msg103331#msg103331 date=1076534229]
    Are you using a D44 because the T-Case is driver side dump?

    I dont know much about T-100's but it looks like you are building a pretty sweet rig.

    Peace Out
    [/quote]

    There's that, the cost of a D44 (free) vs. a D60 or an 80 series. The width is right on as well. I also will not have to cobble a hybrid driveshaft as if i used a toy axle. There's been a couple of D44 SAS. i don't know of anybody going bigger on a T
     
  7. trailcarnage

    trailcarnage

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    Da UP, eh...
    [quote author=Gumby link=board=19;threadid=10278;start=msg103562#msg103562 date=1076555212]
    There's that, the cost of a D44 (free) vs. a D60 or an 80 series. The width is right on as well. I also will not have to cobble a hybrid driveshaft as if i used a toy axle. There's been a couple of D44 SAS. i don't know of anybody going bigger on a T
    [/quote]

    You can get a flange from high-angle driveline to convert the D44 pinion to a toy shaft pattern. This what I do on my Taco SA's
     
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