rustED71's 1991' extcab (1 Viewer)

yotadude520

Mini-Truck Enthusiast
Joined
Jul 12, 2013
Messages
1,761
Location
Tucson, Arizona
 
I'll admit I'm a little apprehensive about doing the timing chain and headgasket myself, it's little bit outside my comfort zone. I know it's not rocket science, I guess I'm just a little afraid I'll mess something up. I'm hoping if I take my time and label everything and do my research it should turn out fine. It's time to teach this old dog some new tricks, lol.
The timing chains on these things aren't difficult at all. The important thing is to double, triple, quadruple check that you're at TDC. From there it's virtually impossible to mess anything up.

Just do the research, jump in and you'll be fine!
 
Joined
Oct 3, 2016
Messages
176
Location
Washington
I had some time to work on the truck this afternoon. I got the upper intake manifold off, I'm working on the lower intake now, buts it kind of a PITA with all the EGR junk in the way. I did an EGR delete on a 22R in one of my 83's and I'm thinking about doing it on this truck, if for no other reason than to give me a little room and clean up the engine bay, plus i really dont feel like reinstalling it, lol. Anyone done a EGR delete on a 22RE or have any thoughts or opinions on it?
 

Mudder

SILVER Star
Joined
Nov 10, 2013
Messages
1,782
Location
Between states
 
Did it on a 22re. No noticeable difference. I was just in the middle of a 22r to re swap and forgot to take good enough photos to rebook up all the vacuum lines.
 
Joined
Oct 3, 2016
Messages
176
Location
Washington
Did it on a 22re. No noticeable difference. I was just in the middle of a 22r to re swap and forgot to take good enough photos to rebook up all the vacuum lines.
Thanks for your input, from everything I've read it seems like it doesn't really make a noticeable difference one way or the other. I dont have to worry about smog checks in my area, so I think I am going to do this, it should tidy up the engine bay and make it easier to work on in the future.
 
Joined
Oct 3, 2016
Messages
176
Location
Washington
Does anyone know what size the hidden hex/Allen bolt is for the lower intake manifold that's hidden under the thermostat housing? I need to get a long Allen wrench, I'm thinking a straight one that will fit a 3/8 drive ratchet, but I dont know what size and dont want to buy a whole set and im not at the house to check ...thanks
 

KLF

Frame waxer
SILVER Star
Joined
Apr 5, 2003
Messages
8,914
Location
Southern NH
 
 
 
I had some time to work on the truck this afternoon. I got the upper intake manifold off, I'm working on the lower intake now, buts it kind of a PITA with all the EGR junk in the way.
Maybe too late, but my method was to pull disconnect the engine harness from the ECU inside the cab, pull it through the firewall and zip-tie it in a bundle on top of the intake. Then, unbolt the exhaust manifold and head (don't forget that pesky bolt in the puddle of oil at the front), and lift the whole head and intake off as a unit. The guy I bought my red truck from was a former Toyota tech and he said that's how they always did it. Yeah, it's heavy and awkward, but a lot easier than trying to bend over and get all those darned bolts. Plop the whole thing on a bench.

I actually made a jig that holds the assembled head on top of an old Workmate. Worked really great. I think I threw it away a few months ago, no need for it anymore. Found a photo from when I did the HG on the red truck in '05.

HeadStand.jpg
 
Joined
Oct 3, 2016
Messages
176
Location
Washington
Maybe too late, but my method was to pull disconnect the engine harness from the ECU inside the cab, pull it through the firewall and zip-tie it in a bundle on top of the intake. Then, unbolt the exhaust manifold and head (don't forget that pesky bolt in the puddle of oil at the front), and lift the whole head and intake off as a unit. The guy I bought my red truck from was a former Toyota tech and he said that's how they always did it. Yeah, it's heavy and awkward, but a lot easier than trying to bend over and get all those darned bolts. Plop the whole thing on a bench.

I actually made a jig that holds the assembled head on top of an old Workmate. Worked really great. I think I threw it away a few months ago, no need for it anymore. Found a photo from when I did the HG on the red truck in '05.
Man that's a good idea, I wouldn't have thought to do it that way. It's a little too late for me to do that now, but I'll definitely keep that method in mind the next time. I like the jig you made, looks way easier to work on that way!

20200212_161957.jpg

I swung by Harbor freight on the way home and just grabbed a set of 3/8 drive long reach hex bits. The bolt in question is a 6mm for future reference. Anyway I figure for 15 bucks and a lifetime warranty I'd give them a shot. Got home and tried to break it loose and it's pretty stuck. To my surprise the hex bit is holding up, it's the head of the bolt that feels like it's going to strip out...I tried to tighten it a little and then loosen to see if it might break loose that way by working it back and forth but no luck. Decided to quit for tonight.
 
Joined
Sep 11, 2012
Messages
551
Location
Vancouver, B.C.
 
If you can get some Liquid Wrench or similar fluid to it, let it soak overnight. I used to use Liquid Wrench, but switched to Moovit a few years ago. No guarantee or evidence that it's better. Go slowly on that hex bolt. It would be a major pain to strip it. Don't forget the little coolant return pipe bolts underneath as well.
 
Joined
Oct 3, 2016
Messages
176
Location
Washington
If you can get some Liquid Wrench or similar fluid to it, let it soak overnight. I used to use Liquid Wrench, but switched to Moovit a few years ago. No guarantee or evidence that it's better. Go slowly on that hex bolt. It would be a major pain to strip it. Don't forget the little coolant return pipe bolts underneath as well.
I took your advice and got some Liquid Wrench and let it soak overnight last night. Got home this afternoon and gave it a try but it still was a no go, I feel like I'm going to strip the bolt head out if I try to push it any further. I think I will remove the fuel rail tomorrow and see if I can get better access to that bolt. Maybe a combination of vice grips and the hex bit would work. I think I'll order a replacement O-ring kit for the fuel injectors as well as a new banjo bolt and crush washers to reinstall the fuel rail. I'm thinking I might go ahead and get a new oil pump while I'm at it, then I should have all my bases covered. I should have just bought the entire timing chain kit from LCE Performance, it came with water pump, oil pump, timing chain and gears and steel guides and all the gaskets, crank seals, and chain tensioner, I didnt see this kit until tonight...this thing is starting to nickle and dime me, lol! I found a OEM Aisin oil pump at Yotashop for $55 I guess I'll add that to the ever growing list of parts
Screenshot_20200213-183839_Chrome.jpg
 
Last edited:
Joined
Oct 3, 2016
Messages
176
Location
Washington
One small victory this morning. I removed my fuel rail to access the hidden Allen bolt underneath. A combination of Liquid Wrench, Hex bit and vice grips and I was able to remove it without stripping the head out. Its all in the little things, lol..
20200216_094450.jpg

20200216_094707.jpg

20200216_095546.jpg

The fuel injector o rings definitely need replaced, one of the little cups that the injector fits into crumbled, so I'll be order an o- ring kit, new banjo bolt and crush washers for the fuel rail, EGR delete kit and a oil pump tonight.
 
Joined
Oct 3, 2016
Messages
176
Location
Washington
I was removing the water pump today and the longer 12mm headed bolt in the middle was stripped, I got it out but the threads were all corroded and messed up. Does anyone know if it threads directly into the timing chain cover or does it go all the way through and into the block? Seems like a really long bolt, all the rest around the parameter were 10mm. Here's a pic of the location of the hole in question:
Screenshot_20200216-175842_Messenger.jpg
 
Joined
Oct 3, 2016
Messages
176
Location
Washington
I know these updates are pretty boring, but I'll continue on, maybe someday I'll get to some interesting stuff!... So I used 2 breaker bars, one on the crankshaft pulley bolt, and the other on the camshaft gear bolt. I was able to break the cam gear bolt loose, but now I was left with how to loosen the crank shaft pulley bolt. I dont have an impact driver. I thought about trying the "ignition bump " method with the breaker bar set against the frame, but that seemed kinda sketchy, also I didnt really want to do that since I already have the engine set at TDC. So I tried attaching a ratchet strap to the frame wrapping it around the crank pulley and then to driverside frame rail. I wrapped it so when I used the breaker bar it would put more tension on the pulley. It would have worked, except the thin material of my cheap Walmart ratchet strap, it broke. So then I bought a $11 come-a-long and tried the same method as the ratchet strap...worked like a charm, but that bolt must have been set at 200ft/lbs or more!...
20200218_140859.jpg

At least I thought ahead and spent the $15 for a 3 jaw puller while at Harbor freight. It madethe bottom pulley removal an easy job.
20200218_142839.jpg
 
Last edited:

KLF

Frame waxer
SILVER Star
Joined
Apr 5, 2003
Messages
8,914
Location
Southern NH
 
 
 
I know these updates are pretty boring, but I'll continue on, maybe someday I'll get to some interesting stuff!... So I used 2 breaker bars, one on the crankshaft pulley bolt, and the other on the camshaft gear bolt. I was able to break the cam gear bolt loose, but now I was left with how to loosen the crank shaft pulley bolt. I dont have an impact driver. I thought about trying the "ignition bump " method with the breaker bar set against the frame, but that seemed kinda sketchy, also I didnt really want to do that since I already have the engine set at TDC.
WOW you made a lot of extra work for yourself. The starter bump method works really well, and is safe if you just wrap a strap/rope/bungee around the wrench on the frame. I've used it MANY times, I actually think it is safer than that contraption you came up with. It's not like it's hard to put everything back at TDC, ya know?

I don't think I've ever needed a puller on the crank pulley. I remember the first time I did a FMS on my 1st 22R, I borrowed a puller like that. As I was putting the puller on, then entire thing (pulley and all) fell off on the ground.
 
Joined
Oct 3, 2016
Messages
176
Location
Washington
WOW you made a lot of extra work for yourself. The starter bump method works really well, and is safe if you just wrap a strap/rope/bungee around the wrench on the frame. I've used it MANY times, I actually think it is safer than that contraption you came up with. It's not like it's hard to put everything back at TDC, ya know?

I don't think I've ever needed a puller on the crank pulley. I remember the first time I did a FMS on my 1st 22R, I borrowed a puller like that. As I was putting the puller on, then entire thing (pulley and all) fell off on the ground.
Yeah I didnt think about it, I guess I could have pulled the fuel pump fuse, at the time I was thinking the detached fuel line to the fuel rail might make a mess. I have used the starter bump method on a ford 302 that I swapped into my 86' 4runner...I guess I was leaving it as a last resort, lol. The come-along actually worked out pretty well. I bought the puller after watching a youtube video and the guy was tapping that bottom pulley off with a hammer, after the video sped up and it took him forever I figured I'd rather play it safe with the puller, lol.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Sep 11, 2012
Messages
551
Location
Vancouver, B.C.
 
My pulley usually just falls off. I tried various shenanigans like wrapping the pulley, the starter method, etc. Now I have an impact, which is very worthwhile to have.
 
Joined
Oct 3, 2016
Messages
176
Location
Washington
Finally getting back to work on this after a month! I got the head off this morning. I bought new headbolts, what's the best way to chase & clean up the head bolt threads in the block? I've heard alot of different theories some say use a bottom out tap, some say just cut a slit with a grinder on a old headbolt and use that because you just want to clean out the threads not cut new threads...what's method have you guys used? Some of my old head bolts threads were pretty gummed up. Thanks in advance for your input, hope you all are doing well!
20200330_094430.jpg

20200330_094424.jpg

20200330_094344.jpg
 
Joined
Oct 3, 2016
Messages
176
Location
Washington
So I was cleaning the old headgasket off the block, then went and flipped the head over to clean the mating surface of the head, that's when I noticed the crack...same cylinder (#2) that was burning coolant. Not sure if the crack was the cause or if it was the result of me driving it after the headgasket failed?...kinda of bummed out, I was hoping to have the new headgasket installed today and start reassembly.
20200330_141559.jpg

20200330_141638.jpg
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 1, 2011
Messages
822
Location
Loomis, California
 
Bummer!!! I’m in a similar boat. Head issues... don’t skimp when purchasing a new head. Buy one from 22re performance or a OEM. Trust me, you will be pulling your engine apart after 20k to redo what you could have prevented. Also, why didn’t you pull your engine?? Soooo much easier to disassemble and reassemble on the bench, especially if you are doing that extensive of a rebuild. Make sure to use a quality head gasket too...
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top Bottom