Rust in bottom of door seams...

Discussion in '60-Series Wagons' started by Project60, Feb 17, 2009.

  1. Project60

    Project60

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    I have some mild rust in the bottom of all four doors (inside where skin wraps around). I have everything stripped, and the seam sealer wire wheeled out. I really don't want to de-skin all the doors to clean the rust out.

    What is the best chemical to "dip" the bottom of the doors?

    I am thinking of a pan full of chemicals, set the door in it, then remove rinse and wash. I don't have access to scrub, but I have room to rinse/wash and primer upon completion.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. Dieseler

    Dieseler

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    Use naval jelly just brushon and rinse off well then use rust buster or POR before painting
     
  3. slcfj62

    slcfj62

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    Well, I am by no means an expert, but I have been consulting with my neighbor that has run his own bodyshop for over 20 years, and he is an expert. I have been going over my 1988 fj62 with a fine tooth comb prepping it for paint--taking the fenders off, treating any rust spots, etc. He says you can't really stop rust 100% unless you can grind it down to bare metal, or cut it out and replace it. If it is on the surface, you can grind down through the rust to bare metal, but for seams or corners you can't really stop it, just slow it down. So, on his advice, I grind it down where I can, and where I can't get to bare metal (such as the bottom door seams) I have been treating the rust with some stuff called "Rust Mort" which is a phosphoric acid based rust treatment. The phosphoric acid reacts witht the rust and turns it black supposedly sealing the surface. It's then primed and painted. Rust is caused by moisture being trapped by dirt, in a seam, etc, so the secret is to prevent the moisture from being trapped. Once you have treated the rust, primed the bare metal, and put seam sealer on, then you put some stuff inside the door along the inside of the seam to prevent any water getting into the seam from the inside. He is going to do that part for me, but he described it as a seam sealer that retains it's elasticity so it doesn't get brittle and crack as the doors are opened and shut a million times, thereby preventing water from getting into the seams.

    So, I guess I got carried away with my post. In reading some threads on this subject, it almost gets to be a religious discussion. I think it really depends on your goals as to how far you want to go. My goal is to slow the rust down so I get another 10 years or so out of the Cruiser. By then, I think parts are going to be scarce, and it will have to be retired anyway.
     
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  4. Project60

    Project60

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    Thanks for the replies guys.

    That's one vote for naval jelly, one for phosphoric acid.

    Is naval jelly thick enough you can brush it on and let it sit? That way I wouldn't have to find a pan to dip it in.
     
  5. GLTHFJ60

    GLTHFJ60 Rum Runnin' SILVER Star

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    I don't know how to get the rust out of the bottom of the seam, but after it's painted you can put some ATF down in the seam. It will creep up into the seam and prevent rust.

    You can't prevent water from getting into the door either. Water will always pass the felt window wipers and drip to the bottom, hence the drain holes. Make sure the holes aren't plugged up.
     
  6. Southeast Overland

    Southeast Overland

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    I had the same problem in my Pig. I wirewheeled the seams as best I could and then applied numerous applications of POR's rust treatment (an acid), then slathered in POR15. I haven't had any rust return since then.
     
  7. Michael Hanson

    Michael Hanson

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    Used to be a company that treated for rust called Ziebart I dont know if they are still in business. Mike
     
  8. 79fj40moneypit

    79fj40moneypit

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    You can clean the rust off the best you can then dip the bottom of the door in rust converter let it sit for a while so it gets in the seam then let it dry completly then POR or rust bullet poured inside and painted outside it should seal it for a go long time. But nothings 100% if you don't cut out or grind the rust away.

    I took some heavy plastic and made a trough on the bottom of the door by taping the plastic to the door and then poured the phosphosic acid into the inside of the door and let it soak that way. I didn't pull the door off. I poked a hole in the plastic after about a half hour and drained it into a pan and then poured it into the next door about 2 quarts of acid. Be sure to CLEAN to junk out of inside of the door before doing this.

    Be sure to wear Safety equipment Glasses ect.
     
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