Rotisserie (1 Viewer)

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Jul 28, 2007
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I've just about got it polished off. Building a rotisserie was not all that complicated but labour intensive. Steel is outrageously expensive right now. I've got a few more bits on the other half to finish and then its paint time. The next task is to tear down the 70 to the bare tub ..... I'm sure that will be fun.
IMG_5657.jpg
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Port Coquitlam
Nicely done!
What are you using to attach to the body? I see the locking bolts on the bottom piece to secure the lenght, nice touch, it should not move too much. Only thing is if you are going to be moving it around it might flex as you only have the one center piece to secure the length. What are you using to lock the angle into place when you rotate the body? Also I see the locking bolts for the horizontal piece of the bracket that will go to the body, other then the bolts do you have any other way of securing it? the bolts might not be enough once you have the weight on there. Maybe drilling some holes and using a trailer pin to secure the height would be more effective. I't a lot more work but if you drill holes every 2 inches on the entire span of the jack it will give you a steady, sure locking position that will not slip. At least the 70 body doesn't weigh as much as the 60.
Out of curiosity, after all the material costs and labour (let's say regular fabricating rate for a home business of $40/hr) how much do you think the total is?
 
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Dec 29, 2006
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Abby
Its a bit different than the one my neighbor built for classic car restorations. His has a frame to accomidate uni-body vehicles. I like the hydraulic jack on yours. Makes for quick and easy height adjustments.
 
Joined
Jul 28, 2007
Messages
814
Nicely done!
What are you using to attach to the body? I see the locking bolts on the bottom piece to secure the lenght, nice touch, it should not move too much. Only thing is if you are going to be moving it around it might flex as you only have the one center piece to secure the length. What are you using to lock the angle into place when you rotate the body? Also I see the locking bolts for the horizontal piece of the bracket that will go to the body, other then the bolts do you have any other way of securing it? the bolts might not be enough once you have the weight on there. Maybe drilling some holes and using a trailer pin to secure the height would be more effective. I't a lot more work but if you drill holes every 2 inches on the entire span of the jack it will give you a steady, sure locking position that will not slip. At least the 70 body doesn't weigh as much as the 60.
Out of curiosity, after all the material costs and labour (let's say regular fabricating rate for a home business of $40/hr) how much do you think the total is?

I am going to wait until I have a better idea of how bad the rear cross member is until I fab up the mounting plates. I may use the lower hinge mounts for the rear door as an attachment point so I have full access to the under belly. The teeth from the worm gear seem to hold the angle in place however I've left some length on the rotating axle on the other side. I'm going to weld a ring with holes all the way around it on that and put a sliding locking pin along top of the carrier tube. I just have to figure out how to cut a circles with out a CNC, plasma cutter or band saw. I don't think a hole saw will last long on thick plate and a jig saw will take a week. I'm planning on putting pins through the horizontal sliding adjusters as well. I agree, I don't think the jamb nuts will hold the weight. Material wise I'm thinking about $700. I got a deal on the rams but the steel and casters were spendy. Hour wise I think about 10-15 hours as I had most of the steel pre cut so I didn't have to go through a bunch of discs on my cut off saw. Ones specked out like this go on sale for around $1100 - $1200 once in a while. I have more time than money and the experience of planning and building this has been worth the time. You learn a ton with every project and that knowledge is gold. I learned from my last restoration that I'm never steam cleaning, prepping and painting the undercarriage of a vehicle from underneath while on my back ever again. That 340 Dart GTS was cool despite the $40/Hr in 97 octane gas it cost to run it.:rolleyes: The 70 is way more fun!


YouTube - 1969 Dodge GTS 340 Four Barrel
 
Joined
Jun 1, 2006
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Port Coquitlam
Sound like a good design. Before I got my plasma cutter everything was done with either Oxy, grinder or sawzall. It took forever, I feel your pain.
 
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vansterdam, BC
nice work dave! nothing beats the satisfaction of $$ saved by doing it yourself. cant wait to see pics of it in action.

...since the 70s going under the knife...does that mean you'll be wheeling -- err asking the mrs if you can wheel her 80? :D
 
Joined
Jul 28, 2007
Messages
814
LOL,

Maybe some milder trails. The minister of finance isn't keen on having pin striping added to her/our 80. Happy wife = Happy life. If the weather keeps up I'll have the 70 done in a few months as camping doesn't appeal to me when its pouring rain out.
 

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