road trip torque cheat sheet?

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Apr 9, 2017
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tejas
"torque before trip" cheat sheet?

someone elsewhere was helping me out while i chase down a front end mini waggle. i'm loaning out to a local mechanic who used to have a cruiser next week so i'm going over my notes.
anyway. is there a road trip torque cheat sheet somewhere?
someone posted the following for a torque before trip list and i figure to draw one up so i can keep it in the truck. anyone mind helping me out by adding items but also making sure i can identify them in the FSM? looks like i am missing brake caliper diagram so i'll post that.
basically i just want to do a quick print out with whatever i need to check - highlight them and to staple it and put it in the glove box. THANKS
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drive flange bolts. 26 ft lb
knuckle stud bolts. 71 ft lb
front caliper bolts. 90 ft lb.
lug nuts. 76 ft lb (may vary)
rear caliper bolts. 65 ft lb
front panhard bolts. 127 ft lb

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Joined
Jan 5, 2017
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4,030
Location
Charlotte, NC & Alexandria, VA
You can't "check" torque of installed fasteners.

Dynamic torque (which is what you measure as you are installing the fastener) is less than static torque (which is what the torque wrench indicates when you put it on a fastener that has already been tightened). This is why many industries use the two exposed thread rule when installing nuts. It allows an inspector to visually determine whether the nut has moved from its installed position.

If you put a torque wrench on an installed fastener, the value it indicates, when the fastener starts to move, will always be much greater than the value that was indicated when the fastener was installed at the proper torque value.

On the 80s, for many critical fasteners, the fit is so tight, given the clearance in the hole, or the load on the retained part, or both, that the part(s) would appear to be adequately retained, when, in fact, the fastener torque was inadequate under service load.

There should be no "loosening" observed if the fasteners were installed properly; that's the purpose of torque specifications.
 

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