Replacement for moisture barrier and a better way to fix inner trim panels on doors

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Fitted one of the two replacement rear manual window no-flare doors to my 80 yesterday and as I'm replacing the old factory trims with nice aluminium checkerplate ones I started wondering about whether there's any need to have a moisture barrier layer behind the new trim panels. Is the plastic only there to stop the factory trims getting wet?

I also got thinking about how to mount them so they're removable if needed using rivnuts and some sort of bolt setup. I don't have a rivnut setting gun or any rivnuts yet. I'm thinking stainless m5 or m6 thread rivnuts and some sort of flat (pan head) stainless bolts instead of plastic clips using the same holes on the door metal that the clips would otherwise fit into.
 
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As I understand it, the plastic is there to prevent both moisture and dust intrusion. It should be easy enough to replace. Get some plastic sheeting and use your door card as a template to cut it, then source whatever that adhesive goo is around the edge. I'd keep it in place personally.

I've also considered aftermarket door cards, in my case the ABS plastic ones here:

Haven't pulled the trigger yet, and I also have questions about how it'd look and sit, especially since it'll be thinner than the original. In your case with checkerplate, rivnuts sound like a good way to go. I used them when mounting my snorkel. Might be worth dropping by a proper fastener supplier and see if they have a good suggestion for the bolts. I go to a local place called Nepean Boltmaster when I need something unusual.
 

mudgudgeon

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Yeah, the plastic keeps dust and moisture out.

I think OEM plastic sheets are still available. The OEM sheets are a two layer design to allow wiring, and lock actuator rods etc to pass between layers and still keep a dust barrier in place.


Panhead screw is actually a quite high dome.

Search for flat socket head / socket cap screws, or flanged button socket screws, or wafer head socket screw. All have a low profile head, with different shapes.

ebay is a good source for stuff like this for little projects.

rivnuts can be installed easily in seconds with an improvised tool IF they are going into the right size hole in FLAT panel

Personally not a fan of checker plate. Guillotine cut edges are always crinkly, and you can bet that 2/3 of screws are gonna land half on a raised rib

download (5).jpeg

pan head

images (11).jpeg

Flanged button screw

images (12).jpeg

 

mudgudgeon

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I use a similar method to this



Impact driver is the key.

I usually use my stainless steel shop ruler, put a bolt and a washer through the hole in the end of the rule, (in place of the coupling nut and wrench in the video) then the rivnut
Spray a bit of lube on the washers, or a dab of grease for better results

Works every time, unless the hole isn't the right, tight size, or the panel isn't flat enough
 
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Neat! I've got some M5 and M6 ones to try. The holes are about 8.5 mm in the door metal where the plastic clips would lock in.

The hole size is the concern as the M6 ones are about 0.5 too big and the m5 ones seem like they might slop around a bit too much to bit in when compressed. I'll do a test and see.
 

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