Remedy for bent lug?

Discussion in '80-Series Tech' started by Bluto, Jun 14, 2005.

  1. Bluto

    Bluto

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    I'm in the process of replacing my aftermarket rims with Sequoia 17s. While taking off the lug nuts in the P rear, noticed one lug was hard to loosen. In my eagerness, used my weight on the OEM wrench to loosen it. I'm not sure if it was bent already or maybe it was me. I will be taking it to a wheel shop. What am I looking at in terms of remedy and price? I weigh 200lbs. :frown:
     
  2. Shipwreck

    Shipwreck SILVER Star

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    I think Jenny Craig has a special running now; free initiation and just the cost of food for the first three months.

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    Seriously, replacing a bent stud is easy. Remove the hub/disk. Hammer out the old stud. Tap in a new stud and tighten with an old lugnut. Replace the hub/disk and go. Cost is about 2 - 3 dollars and 1/2 hr of your time.
     
  3. Bluto

    Bluto

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    Thanks Shipwreck. There is the matter of getting the lug nut out. Very difficult to remove with the wrench I have (hence bending it in the first place). I have limited tools as I will be buying them per LC need basis (learning on the go also). Will give it a try again. I have one 17" (7.5x17) wheel in the front - they don't fill the fender compared to the 8x16. Hoping 265/70/17 replacements will do the trick. BTW, kind of surprise nobody got on the bent stud (lug) - I guess everybody's mind is out of the gutter.
     
  4. Rich

    Rich

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    One tool that I think should be in every land cruiser is an 18 - 20 inch long 1/2" drive breaker bar with a long impact socket for removing and installing lug nuts. Works so much better than the tool provided by Toyota; makes wheel changing very easy. The only use remaining for the Toyota lug wrench is prying out the center caps.

    With the above it would have been a lot less likely for you to have bent the wheel stud.
     
  5. elum

    elum

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    keep wrenching the lug till it breaks.. then after you remove the wheel.. take off the rotor then take off the lug backside and replace.. so yeah.. you're gonna need a new lug and a new lug nut... btw, hinds suck
     
  6. IdahoDoug

    IdahoDoug

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    Elum/txkndu,

    Actually, the 95 is a full floater and it's not a matter of simply removing the rear rotor. Once the rotor is off, you have to pull the axle shaft by unbolting the 8(?) cone washer bolts. Then disassemble the wheel bearings and only then can you remove the hub from the spindle.

    You will then need 3 new seals and to repack the bearings.

    You *might* shortcut this if you're not faint of heart by pounding the lug out on the truck if there's space (can't remember if there is), but this is extremely hard on the bearings and you risk flat spotting them. Especially if they're in the typical shape for 154k which is that the inner seal has failed and gear oil has washed out the grease which would be better able to take a risky pounding. I'd replace them all and it's an excellent time for bearing repack and new seals all at the same time.

    DougM
     
  7. mooker82

    mooker82

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    I replaced the wheel studs on the rear of my 97 without doing what doug states. I just removed the wheel took off the caliper(2 bolts), removed the rotor, and knocked out the broken wheel studs. Then just inserted new wheel studs and tightened a lug nut down to pull it through. We will see if I messed up anything next week whenever I repack the rear bearings.
     
  8. elum

    elum

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    IdahoDoug... is this a difference between '95s and '97s? Hmnn... I apologize if I passed any bad gouge...

    As for the Hind.. maybe I mispoke.. they don't completely suck... they're good for what they were built for... troop lift and attack.. but not anything special in either category in my mind... the armor they have is nice for the attack.. but they're so heavy and unmaneuverable they make for an easy target... even if they were retrofited with IRCM via heat shields, turned exhausts, and flares... I don't know how well they'd do against a 3rd gen manpad let alone a 4th gen.. but then again what helicopter would fare better... maybe i'm just jealous b/c my helicopter doesn't carry guns/cannons quite so large...
     
  9. IdahoDoug

    IdahoDoug

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    Mooker,

    Sweet, then there is room to pound them off on the truck, eh? I couldn't remember if they'd hit the axle housing before coming all the way out the back. I'd do this on the trail, but if at home I would definitely pull the hub. Especially if it seems like a good time to repack the rear wheel bearings anyhow. It's a real cake job to do though there's a 3 pin special tool to tighten the bearing lock ring. BTW, I've never told you but your avatar really cracks me up!

    Elum,

    93 on up to 97 are exactly the same back there unless you have a rare early 93 with drums/semi floater. So, no worries - sounds like you actually have room to pound them out.

    My suggestion is to replace them all as the first one to fail is simply the canary in the coal mine telling you they've all been stressed and are weak. I did this a couple years ago X 24.
     
  10. Bob_Garrett

    Bob_Garrett

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    Better to replace all 6 studs while you have it apart. Chances are that the problem with the one was due to overtighening and the others may be weakened as well.

    Bob
     
  11. ace10

    ace10 Another one bites the dust! SILVER Star

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    AMEN. the labor charge is eaten up by getting to the first one. if you can get the nuts off the remaining studs, you can reuse them, but spend the xtra bucks to replace all six. if you don't and the next one goes, you will kick yourself.
     
  12. Nick the Carpenter

    Nick the Carpenter

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    sound like to do all.
     
  13. mooker82

    mooker82

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    When I did mine I did all of them on the right rear. I remember this was the last tire that they put on when they rotated the tires and I guess they were in a hurry. I broke off 4 wheel studs trying to get the lug nuts loose, as the threads were crossed. I then had to go to 2 different toyota dealerships to find 4 new lug nuts. One dealership had 2 in stock and the other had 3 so I bought all I could find so I would have atleast one spare. Pounding out the studs is good in an emergency or if you are lazy, takes all of 30 min. Thanks to the advise of Doug and others I will be repacking the wheel bearings soon as they made it seem easier than I thought.
     
  14. elum

    elum

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    TXKNDU, I wish I was a history buff.. I'm constantly studying.. and actually learning Enemy Threat Systems falls under my Military Occupational Specialty. And no I do not have my own helicopter.. well not really--it doesn't belong to me.. but does having my name on the side count?

    I remember watching on the Discovery channel about the Hind being retrofitted with heat suppressors on the exhausts after the introduction of the early Stingers into the Afghanistan theater.. I believe it helped somewhat but would also require some nifty maneuvering from the Hind in order to change the tail-aspect persepective to the missle to a side or front-aspect (less heat/IR signature due to the engines being in the aft part of the aircraft). This maneuvering was a design handicap to the Hind b/c of the Hinds weight and it's dependancy on the stub wings to produce lift which it did will in straight flight but not so well in banked turns... This would allow a second Stinger missle launcher who would be set-up for basically a L-attack on the aircraft to launch a second one if the first missed at an aircraft in a very low energy state due to bleeding off so much energy/airspeed in the turn.

    Anyway.. would the Hind fare better than Blackhawks? Blackhawks aren't small but are smaller than Hinds and can fit places that Hinds can't.. Blackhawks are more manueverable but carry much less of a weapons payload.. For assault support the Blackhawk would and will do a better job..

    Finally.. as low tech as the insurgents seem.. they do have SA-7/14/16/18 missles and those are anything but low tech.. they can take almost any aircraft out of the sky.. you can research them on www.fas.org. The US military does have ASE gear though, that will deter the SA missles threats and allow us to continue flight operations as we have. However, ASE (aircraft survivability equipment) can only do so much... if your heat/IR signature is so great (i.e. CH-53 or HIND) then it will be overpowered by the own aircraft's heat/IR signature..

    My LX450 will be stock for a while it looks like.. at least till I get home from deployment :D
     
  15. elum

    elum

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    My pleasure to serve. That's the beauty of an all-volunteer force..

    It's been a while (knock on wood) since a US Helicopter has been shot down by a ManPAD (man portable air defense system). You can account a lot of it from learning the enemy's tactics and developing effective countertactics.. as well the procurement of new technologies with our ASE gear. Basically we're flying smarter..

    Below is the link to the Rest of the World Missle Systems
    Link to info on Missle Systems

    As for the Hind.. between you and I... it is pretty sweet looking.. and no I'd never want to meet it face to face in my UH-1N.. in the Desert with no Terrain I'd have a very difficult time.. but give me terrain and now I have the advantage. I believe for Defensive Air Combat Maneuvering (DACM) against the Hind I'd have to climb quite a bit in the merge.. avoid the cannon of the Hind.. then do a dive and come around in a High Yo-Yo.. grrr.. I digress.. Semper Fi and keep the rubber side down...
     
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